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Doo-Sik Kong, Yong Hwy Kim and Chang-Ki Hong

OBJECTIVE

Spheno-orbital meningiomas (SOMs) are complicated tumors that involve multiple structures at initial presentation, such as the orbit, temporalis muscle, sphenoidal bone, cavernous sinus, and temporal or infratemporal fossa. The infiltrative growth and complexity of this type of meningioma make total resection impossible. In this study, the authors evaluated the surgical outcome of the endoscopic transorbital approach (eTOA) for SOM. In addition, they identified optimal indications for the use of eTOA and analyzed the feasibility of this approach as a minimally invasive surgery for SOMs of varying types and locations at presentation.

METHODS

Between September 2016 and December 2019, the authors performed eTOA in 41 patients with SOM with or without orbital involvement at 3 independent tertiary institutions. The authors evaluated the surgical outcomes of eTOA for SOM and investigated several factors that affect the outcome, such as tumor volume, tumor location, and the presence of lateral orbitotomy. Gross-total resection (GTR) was defined as complete resection of the tumor or intended subtotal resection except the cavernous sinus. This study was undertaken as a multicenter project (006) of the Korean Society of Endoscopic Neurosurgery (KOSEN-006).

RESULTS

There were 41 patients (5 men and 36 women) with a median age of 52.0 years (range 24–73 years). Twenty-one patients had tumors that involved the orbital structure, while 14 patients had tumors that presented at the sphenoidal bone along with other structures, such as the cavernous sinus, temporal fossa, and infratemporal fossa. Fifteen patients had the globulous type of tumor and 26 patients had the en plaque type. Overall, GTR was achieved in 21 of 41 patients (51.2%), and complications included CSF leaks in 2 patients and wound complications in 2 patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the en plaque type of tumor, absence of lateral orbital rim osteotomy, involvement of the temporal floor or infratemporal fossa, and involvement of the orbit and medial one-third of the greater sphenoidal wing were closely associated with lower GTR rates (p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that the en plaque type of tumor and the absence of lateral orbital rim osteotomy were significant predictors for lower GTR rate.

CONCLUSIONS

The en plaque type of SOM remains a challenge despite advances in technique such as minimally invasive surgery. Overall, clinical outcome of eTOA for SOM was comparable to the transcranial surgery. To achieve GTR, eTOA is recommended, with additional lateral orbital rim osteotomy for globulous-type tumors, without involving the floor of the temporal and infratemporal fossa.

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Doo-Sik Kong, Kwan Park, Byoung-gook Shin, Jeong Ah Lee and Dong-Ok Eum

Object

The authors conducted a large retrospective study in which they evaluated the efficacy of intraoperative electromyography (EMG) monitoring of facial musculature during microvascular decompression (MVD) and assessed the predictive value of the lateral spread response (LSR) as a prognostic indicator for the treatment outcome of hemifacial spasm (HFS).

Methods

The authors undertook intraoperative monitoring during MVD in 300 consecutive patients with HFS. The patients were divided into two groups based on whether the LSR disappeared or persisted following decompression. The mean follow-up period was 35.8 months (range 12–55 months). In 263 (87.7%) of the 300 patients, the LSR was observed during intraoperative facial EMG monitoring. In 230 (87.4%) of these 263 patients, the LSR disappeared following decompression (Group I), and in the remaining 33 patients (12.5%) the LSR persisted despite decompression (Group II). At the postoperative 1-year follow-up visit, there was a significant difference in clinical outcomes between both groups (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Facial EMG monitoring of the LSR is an effective tool to use when performing complete decompression, and it may be helpful in predicting outcomes.

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Hun Ho Park, Sang Duk Hong, Yong Hwy Kim, Chang-Ki Hong, Kyung In Woo, In-Sik Yun and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

Trigeminal schwannomas are rare neoplasms with an incidence of less than 1% that require a comprehensive surgical strategy. These tumors can occur anywhere along the path of the trigeminal nerve, capable of extending intradurally into the middle and posterior fossae, and extracranially into the orbital, pterygopalatine, and infratemporal fossa. Recent advancements in endoscopic surgery have suggested a more minimally invasive and direct route for tumors in and around Meckel’s cave, including the endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) and endoscopic transorbital superior eyelid approach (ETOA). The authors assess the feasibility and outcomes of EEA and ETOA for trigeminal schwannomas.

METHODS

A retrospective multicenter analysis was performed on 25 patients who underwent endoscopic surgical treatment for trigeminal schwannomas between September 2011 and February 2019. Thirteen patients (52%) underwent EEA and 12 (48%) had ETOA, one of whom underwent a combined approach with retrosigmoid craniotomy. The extent of resection, clinical outcome, and surgical morbidity were analyzed to evaluate the feasibility and selection of surgical approach between EEA and ETOA based on predominant location of trigeminal schwannomas.

RESULTS

According to predominant tumor location, 9 patients (36%) had middle fossa tumors (Samii type A), 8 patients (32%) had dumbbell-shaped tumors located in the middle and posterior cranial fossae (Samii type C), and another 8 patients (32%) had extracranial tumors (Samii type D). Gross-total resection (GTR, n = 12) and near-total resection (NTR, n = 7) were achieved in 19 patients (76%). The GTR/NTR rates were 81.8% for ETOA and 69.2% for EEA. The GTR/NTR rates of ETOA and EEA according to the classifications were 100% and 50% for tumors confined to the middle cranial fossa, 75% and 33% for dumbbell-shaped tumors located in the middle and posterior cranial fossae, and 50% and 100% for extracranial tumors. There were no postoperative CSF leaks. The most common preoperative symptom was trigeminal sensory dysfunction, which improved in 15 of 21 patients (71.4%). Three patients experienced new postoperative complications such as vasospasm (n = 1), wound infection (n = 1), and medial gaze palsy (n = 1).

CONCLUSIONS

ETOA provides adequate access and resectability for trigeminal schwannomas limited in the middle fossa or dumbbell-shaped tumors located in the middle and posterior fossae, as does EEA for extracranial tumors. Tumors predominantly involving the posterior fossa still remain a challenge in endoscopic surgery.

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Byung Sup Kim, Yuil Kim, Doo-Sik Kong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Yeon-Lim Suh and Ho Jun Seol

OBJECTIVE

The authors conducted this retrospective study to investigate the clinical outcomes of intracranial solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) and hemangiopericytoma (HPC), defined according to the 2016 WHO classification of central nervous system (CNS) tumors.

METHODS

Histopathologically proven intracranial SFT and HPC cases treated in the period from June 1996 to September 2014 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Two neuropathologists reviewed pathological slides and regraded the specimens according to the 2016 WHO classification. Factors associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were statistically evaluated with uni- and multivariate analyses.

RESULTS

The records of 47 patients—10 with SFT, 33 with HPC, and 4 with anaplastic HPC—were reviewed. A malignant transition from conventional SFT to WHO grade III SFT/HPC was observed in 2 cases, and 13 HPC cases were assigned grade III SFT/HPC. Mean and median follow-ups were 114.6 and 94.7 months, respectively (range 7.1–366.7 months). Gross-total resection (GTR) was significantly associated with longer PFS and OS (p = 0.012 for both), and adjuvant radiation therapy versus no such therapy led to significantly longer PFS (p = 0.018). Extracranial metastases to the liver, bone, lung, spine, and kidney occurred in 10 patients (21.3%). Grade III SFT/HPC was strongly correlated with the development of extracranial metastases (p = 0.031).

CONCLUSIONS

The 2016 WHO classification of CNS tumors reflected the different types of pathological malignant progression and clinical outcomes better than prior classifications. Gross-total resection should be the primary treatment goal in patients with SFT/HPC, regardless of the pathological grade, and radiation can be administered as adjuvant therapy for patients with SFT/HPC that shows an aggressive phenotype or that is not treated with GTR.

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Kyung Hwan Kim, So Jeong Kang, Jung-Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to verify the effect of proactive Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in the treatment of asymptomatic meningioma compared with the natural course without any therapeutic intervention.

METHODS

From January 2006 to May 2017, 354 patients newly diagnosed with asymptomatic meningioma were reviewed and categorized into GKS (n = 153) and observation (n = 201) groups. Clinical and radiological progression rates were examined, and changes in volume were analyzed.

RESULTS

Clinical progression (i.e., clinician-judged progression), combining symptomatic progression (n = 43) and clinician-judged increase in size using images routinely acquired (n = 34), occurred in 4 patients (2.6%) and 73 patients (36.3%) in the GKS and observation groups, respectively (p < 0.001). The clinical progression-free survival (PFS) rates in the GKS and observation groups were 98.7% and 64.6%, respectively, at 5 years (p < 0.001), and 92.9% and 42.7%, respectively, at 10 years (p < 0.001). The radiological tumor control rate was 94.1% in the GKS group, and radiological progression was noted in 141 patients (70.1%) in the observation group. The radiological PFS rates in the GKS and observation groups were 94.4% and 38.5%, respectively, at 5 years (p < 0.001), and 88.5% and 7.9%, respectively, at 10 years (p < 0.001). Young age, absence of calcification, peritumoral edema, and high T2 signal intensity were correlated with clinical progression in the observation group. Volumetric analysis showed that untreated tumors gradually increased in size. However, GKS-treated tumors shrank gradually, although transient volume expansion was observed in the first 6 months. Adverse events developed in 26 of the 195 GKS-treated patients (13.3%), including 1 (0.5%) major event requiring microsurgery due to severe edema after GKS. Peritumoral edema was related to the development of adverse events (p = 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS

Asymptomatic meningioma is a benign disease; however, nearly two-thirds of patients experience tumor growth and one-third of untreated patients eventually require neurosurgical interventions during watchful waiting. GKS can control tumors clinically and radiologically with high probability. Although the risk of transient adverse events exists, proactive GKS may be a reasonable treatment option when there are no comorbidities limiting life expectancy.

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Chiman Jeon, Kyung Rae Cho, Jung Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

This study was performed to evaluate the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) as a primary treatment for central neurocytomas (CNs).

METHODS

The authors retrospectively assessed the treatment outcomes of patients who had undergone primary treatment with GKRS for CNs in the period between December 2001 and December 2018. The diagnosis of CN was based on findings on neuroimaging studies. The electronic medical records were retrospectively reviewed for additional relevant preoperative data, and clinical follow-up data had been obtained during office evaluations of the treated patients. All radiographic data were reviewed by a dedicated neuroradiologist.

RESULTS

Fourteen patients were treated with GKRS as a primary treatment for CNs in the study period. Seven patients (50.0%) were asymptomatic at initial presentation, and 7 (50.0%) presented with headache. Ten patients (71.4%) were treated with GKRS after the diagnosis of CN based on characteristic MRI findings. Four patients (28.6%) initially underwent either stereotactic or endoscopic biopsy before GKRS. The median tumor volume was 3.9 cm3 (range 0.46–18.1 cm3). The median prescription dose delivered to the tumor margin was 15 Gy (range 5.5–18 Gy). The median maximum dose was 30 Gy (range 11–36 Gy). Two patients were treated with fractionated GKRS, one with a prescription dose of 21 Gy in 3 fractions and another with a dose of 22 Gy in 4 fractions. Control of tumor growth was achieved in all 14 patients. The median volume reduction was 26.4% (range 0%–78.3%). Transient adverse radiation effects were observed in 2 patients but resolved with improvement in symptoms. No recurrences were revealed during the follow-up period, which was a median of 25 months (range 12–89 months).

CONCLUSIONS

Primary GKRS for CNs resulted in excellent tumor control rates without recurrences. These results suggest that GKRS may be a viable treatment option for patients with small- to medium-sized or incidental CNs.

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Doo-Sik Kong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Kwan Park and Jong Hyun Kim

Object

The authors conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) followed by radiotherapy for the treatment of unresectable glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs) on patient survival and quality of life.

Methods

A total of 19 patients with unresectable GBMs located in eloquent areas of the brain were eligible for this study. Beginning in January 2002, 10 patients underwent GKS followed by fractionated radiotherapy. Nine patients who had undergone radiotherapy alone after biopsy-proven diagnosis served as the control group. The mean patient ages were 53 years and 56 years, respectively. Preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores were 80 (range 60–100) and 90 (range 50–100), respectively. The median margin dose for GKS was 12 Gy (9–16 Gy), and the total dose for radiotherapy was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. The mean follow-up duration was 7.2 months, the median patient survival time was 52 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI] 22–110.6 weeks) in the GKS group, and the median overall survival time was 28 weeks (95% CI 22.5–33.5 weeks) in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.0758). The estimated progression-free survival rate at 3 months was 75% in the GKS group and 45% in the control group (p = 0.082). The posttreatment KPS scores were either unchanged or improved in the GKS group, whereas it deteriorated by 20 or more points in six of nine patients of the control group (p = 0.004).

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery prior to radiotherapy may be helpful in preserving patients' daily activities in the adjuvant management of unresectable GBM.

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Byung-Euk Joo, Sang-Ku Park, Kyung-Rae Cho, Doo-Sik Kong, Dae-Won Seo and Kwan Park

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to define a new protocol for intraoperative monitoring (IOM) of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) during microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery to treat hemifacial spasm (HFS) and to evaluate the usefulness of this new protocol to prevent hearing impairment.

METHODS

To define the optimal stimulation rate, estimate the number of trials to be averaged, and identify useful warning criteria in IOM of BAEPs, the authors performed a preliminary study of 13 patients with HFS in 2010. They increased the stimulation rate from 10.1 Hz/sec to 100.1 Hz/sec by 10-Hz increments, and they elevated the average time from 100 times to 1000 times by 100-unit increments at a fixed stimulus rate of 43.9 Hz. After defining the optimal stimulation rate and the number of trials that needed to be averaged for IOM of BAEPs, they also identified the useful warning criteria for this protocol for MVD surgery. From January to December 2013, 254 patients with HFS underwent MVD surgery following the new IOM of BAEPs protocol. Pure-tone audiometry and speech discrimination scoring were performed before surgery and 1 week after surgery. To evaluate the usefulness of the new protocol, the authors compared the incidence of postoperative hearing impairment with the results from the group that underwent MVD surgery prior to the new protocol.

RESULTS

Through a preliminary study, the authors confirmed that it was possible to obtain a reliable wave when using a stimulation rate of 43.9 Hz/sec and averaging 400 trials. Only a Wave V amplitude loss > 50% was useful as a warning criterion when using the new protocol. A reliable BAEP could be obtained in approximately 9.1 seconds. When the new protocol was used, 2 patients (0.8%) showed no recovery of Wave V amplitude loss > 50%, and only 1 of those 2 patients (0.39%) ultimately had postoperative hearing impairment. When compared with the outcomes in the pre-protocol group, hearing impairment incidence decreased significantly among patients who underwent surgery with the new protocol (0.39% vs 4.02%, p = 0.002). There were no significant differences between the 2 surgery groups regarding other complications, including facial palsy, sixth cranial nerve palsy, and vocal cord palsy.

CONCLUSIONS

There was a significant decrease in postoperative hearing impairment after MVD for HFS when the new protocol for IOM of BAEPs was used. Real-time IOM of BAEPs, which can obtain a reliable BAEP in less than 10 seconds, is a successful new procedure for preventing hearing impairment during MVD surgery for HFS.

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Yong Hwy Kim, Chiman Jeon, Young-Bem Se, Sang Duk Hong, Ho Jun Seol, Jung-II Lee, Chul-Kee Park, Dong Gyu Kim, Hee-Won Jung, Doo Hee Han, Do-Hyun Nam and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic endonasal approach for treating primary skull base malignancies involving the clivus is a formidable task. The authors hypothesized that tumor involvement of nearby critical anatomical structures creates hurdles to endoscopic gross-total resection (GTR). The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach to treat primary malignancies involving the clivus and to analyze prognostic factors for GTR.

METHODS

Between January 2009 and November 2015, 42 patients underwent the endoscopic endonasal approach for resection of primary skull base malignancies involving the clivus at 2 independent institutions. Clinical data; tumor locations within the clivus; and anatomical involvement of the cavernous or paraclival internal carotid artery, cisternal trigeminal nerve, hypoglossal canal, and dura mater were investigated to assess the extent of resection. Possible prognostic factors affecting GTR were also analyzed.

RESULTS

Of the 42 patients, 37 were diagnosed with chordomas and 5 were diagnosed with chondrosarcomas. The mean (± SD) preoperative tumor volume was 25.2 ± 30.5 cm3 (range 0.8–166.7 cm3). GTR was achieved in 28 patients (66.7%) and subtotal resection in 14 patients (33.3%). All tumors were classified as upper (n = 17), middle (n = 17), or lower (n = 8) clival tumors based on clival involvement, and as central (24 [57.1%]) or paramedian (18 [42.9%]) based on laterality of the tumor. Univariate analysis identified the tumor laterality (OR 6.25, 95% CI 1.51–25.86; p = 0.011) as significantly predictive of GTR. In addition, the laterality of the tumor was found to be a statistically significant predictor in multivariate analysis (OR 41.16, 95% CI 1.12–1512.65; p = 0.043).

CONCLUSIONS

An endoscopic endonasal approach can provide favorable clinical and surgical outcomes. However, the tumor laterality should be considered as a potential obstacle to total removal.

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Kyung-Il Jo, Yong Seok Im, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam, Yoon-Duck Kim and Jung-Il Lee

Object

The goal of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of multisession Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in the treatment of benign orbital tumors.

Methods

Twenty-three patients who retained their vision despite having tumors touching their optic nerve were treated with multisession (4-fraction) GKS. The median tumor volume was 2800 mm3 (range 211–10,800 mm3), and the median cumulative margin dose was 20 Gy (range 18–22 Gy).

Results

The median clinical follow-up duration in these patients was 38 months (range 9–74 months). No patient experienced tumor progression in this study. In particular, a higher degree of tumor shrinkage was found in the 7 patients with cavernous hemangiomas than in patients with other types of lesions (p < 0.05). Of the 23 patients whose preoperative vision was preserved, 11 showed improvement in visual acuity and/or visual field and 12 showed stable visual acuity. No GKS-related adverse events were noted during or after treatment.

Conclusions

Multisession radiosurgery using the Gamma Knife may be a good strategy for tumors in direct contact with the optic nerve. A cumulative margin dose of up to 22 Gy delivered in 4 sessions is safe for preservation of visual function with a high probability of tumor control.