Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 31 items for

  • Author or Editor: Dong-Ho Lee x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

June-Ho Lee and Dong Gyu Kim

✓ The authors report a case of symptomatic brain abscess in a 51-year-old man who presented with personality changes and generalized seizures. He had survived a grenade explosion injury during the Korean War 47 years previously. Computerized tomography scanning revealed multiple conglomerate rim-enhancing lesions and metallic foreign bodies in the right frontal lobe. The mass was totally removed and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from microbial cultures.

Retained foreign bodies in the brain, whether bone or metal, should be removed at the time of injury if at all possible. If this cannot be accomplished, patients with such retained foreign bodies should be carefully monitored for life.

Restricted access

Ho Jun Yi, Jae Hoon Sung, Dong Hoon Lee, Seung Ho Yang and Jae Taek Hong

OBJECTIVE

Volume perfusion CT (VPCT) with added CT angiography (CTA)–like reconstruction from VPCT source data (VPCTA) can reveal multiple intracranial parameters. The authors examined the usefulness of VPCTA in terms of reducing the in-hospital time delay for mechanical thrombectomy.

METHODS

A total of 180 patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy at the authors’ institution between January 2014 and March 2017 were divided into 2 groups: a CTA-based thrombectomy decision group (group 1: CTA) and a VPCTA-based decision group (group 2: VPCTA). Multiple time interval categories (from symptom onset to groin puncture, from hospital arrival to groin puncture, procedure time, from symptom onset to reperfusion, and from hospital arrival to reperfusion) were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and the modified Rankin Scale, and radiological results were evaluated by the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction score.

RESULTS

In all of the time interval categories except for procedure time, the VPCTA group showed a significantly shorter in-hospital time delay during the prethrombectomy period than did the CTA group. The 3-month modified Rankin Scale score was significantly lower in the VPCTA group (2.8) compared with the CTA group (3.5) (p = 0.003). However, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in the other clinical and radiological outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with CTA, VPCTA significantly reduced the in-hospital time delay during the prethrombectomy period.

Restricted access

Ho Jun Yi, Jae Hoon Sung, Dong Hoon Lee, Seung Ho Yang and Jae Taek Hong

OBJECTIVE

Volume perfusion CT (VPCT) with added CT angiography (CTA)–like reconstruction from VPCT source data (VPCTA) can reveal multiple intracranial parameters. The authors examined the usefulness of VPCTA in terms of reducing the in-hospital time delay for mechanical thrombectomy.

METHODS

A total of 180 patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy at the authors’ institution between January 2014 and March 2017 were divided into 2 groups: a CTA-based thrombectomy decision group (group 1: CTA) and a VPCTA-based decision group (group 2: VPCTA). Multiple time interval categories (from symptom onset to groin puncture, from hospital arrival to groin puncture, procedure time, from symptom onset to reperfusion, and from hospital arrival to reperfusion) were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and the modified Rankin Scale, and radiological results were evaluated by the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction score.

RESULTS

In all of the time interval categories except for procedure time, the VPCTA group showed a significantly shorter in-hospital time delay during the prethrombectomy period than did the CTA group. The 3-month modified Rankin Scale score was significantly lower in the VPCTA group (2.8) compared with the CTA group (3.5) (p = 0.003). However, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in the other clinical and radiological outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with CTA, VPCTA significantly reduced the in-hospital time delay during the prethrombectomy period.

Full access

Chang Ju Hwang, Choon Sung Lee, Dong-Ho Lee and Jae Hwan Cho

OBJECTIVE

Progression of trunk imbalance is an important finding during follow-up of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Nevertheless, no factors that predict progression of trunk imbalance have been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify parameters that predict progression of trunk imbalance in cases of AIS with a structural thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curve.

METHODS

This study included 105 patients with AIS and a structural TL/L curve who were followed up at an outpatient clinic. Patients with trunk imbalance (trunk shift ≥ 20 mm) at the initial visit were excluded. All patients were followed up for more than 2 years. Patients were divided into the following groups according to progression of trunk imbalance: 1) Group P, trunk shift ≥ 20 mm at the final visit and degree of progression ≥ 10 mm; and 2) Group NP, trunk shift < 20 mm at the final visit or degree of progression < 10 mm. Radiological parameters included Cobb angle, upper end vertebrae and lower end vertebrae (LEV), LEV tilt, disc wedge angle between LEV and LEV+1, trunk shift, apical vertebral translation, and apical vertebral rotation (AVR). Each parameter was compared between groups. Radiological parameters were assessed at every visit using whole-spine standing anteroposterior radiographs.

RESULTS

Among the 105 patients examined, 13 showed trunk imbalance with progression ≥ 10 mm at the final visit (Group P). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified a lower Risser grade (p = 0.002) and a greater initial AVR (p = 0.020) as predictors of progressive trunk imbalance. A change in LEV tilt during follow-up was associated with trunk imbalance (p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Risser grade and AVR measured at the initial visit may predict progression of trunk imbalance. Surgeons should consider the risk of progressive trunk imbalance if patients show skeletal immaturity and a greater AVR at the initial visit.

Restricted access

Dong Yeob Lee, Tag-Geun Jung and Sang-Ho Lee

Object

The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical outcomes in cases involving elderly patients who underwent single-level instrumented mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective review of 27 consecutive cases involving elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age) who underwent single-level instrumented mini-open TLIF and were followed up for at least 3 years. Degenerative spondylolisthesis was diagnosed in 16 patients, stenosis with instability in 8, and lytic spondylolisthesis in 3. All cases were Grade I or II based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists' classification system. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale, the Oswestry Disability Index, and patients' subjective satisfaction. Sagittal balance, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using plain radiography and 3D CT.

Results

The mean age of patients at the time of surgery was 69.3 years (range 65–80 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients (7.4%) in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 38.6 months (range 36–42 months), clinical success was achieved in 88.9% of cases. The mean segmental lordosis and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 11.9 and 33.5° to 13.9 and 37.2°, p = 0.024 and p = 0.001, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 77.8% of the patients. Adjacent segment deterioration was found in 44.4% of the patients. No patients underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. The development of ASD was significantly related to postoperative sacral tilt (p = 0.006).

Conclusions

Single-level instrumented mini-open TLIF yielded good clinical and radiological outcomes with a low complication rate in elderly patients.

Restricted access

June Ho Lee, Chae-Yong Kim, Dong Gyu Kim and Hee-Won Jung

Restricted access

Jae Hwan Cho, Chang Ju Hwang, Young Hyun Choi, Dong-Ho Lee and Choon Sung Lee

OBJECTIVE

Cervical sagittal alignment (CSA) is related to function and quality of life, but it has not been frequently studied in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This study aimed to reveal the change in CSA following corrective surgery, compare the cervical sagittal parameters according to curve types, and assess related factors for postoperative aggravation of CSA.

METHODS

The authors studied 318 consecutive patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who underwent corrective surgery at a single center. Occiput–C2 and C2–7 lordosis, C2–7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), T-1 slope, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar sagittal profiles were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire (SRS-22) scores were used as clinical outcomes. Each radiological parameter was compared preoperatively and postoperatively according to curve types (double major, single thoracic, and double thoracic curves). Patients were grouped based on preoperative CSA: the lordotic group (group L) and the kyphotic group (group K). Each radiological parameter was compared between the groups. Related factors for postoperative aggravation of CSA were assessed using multivariate logistic analysis.

RESULTS

Of the total number of patients studied, 67.0% (213 of 318) and 54.4% (173 of 318) showed cervical kyphotic alignment preoperatively and postoperatively, respectively. C2–7 lordosis increased (from −5.8° to −1.1°; p < 0.001) and C2–7 SVA decreased (from 24.2 to 20.0 mm; p < 0.001) postoperatively regardless of curve types. Although group K showed improvement in C2–7 lordosis (from −12.7° to −4.8°; p < 0.001), group L showed no difference (from 9.0° to 6.9°; p = 0.115) postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were not related to the degree of cervical kyphosis in this cohort. C2–7 lordosis (p < 0.001) and pelvic tilt (p = 0.019) were related to postoperative aggravation of CSA.

CONCLUSIONS

Regardless of the trend of improvement in CSA, many patients (54.4%) still showed cervical kyphotic alignment postoperatively. C2–7 lordosis and C2–7 SVA improved postoperatively in all curve types. However, postoperative changes in C2–7 lordosis showed different results based on preoperative CSA, which could be related to T-1 slope and thoracic kyphosis. However, clinical outcomes showed no difference based on CSA in this study cohort. Greater C2–7 lordosis and proximal thoracic curve preoperatively were risk factors for postoperative aggravation of CSA (p < 0.001 and p = 0.019, respectively).

Free access

Dong-Ho Lee, Youn-Suk Joo, Chang Ju Hwang, Choon Sung Lee and Jae Hwan Cho

OBJECTIVE

Although posterior decompressive surgery is widely used to treat patients with cervical myelopathy and multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), a poor outcome is anticipated if the sagittal alignment is kyphotic (or K-line negative). Accordingly, it is mandatory to perform anterior decompression and fusion in patients with cervical kyphosis. However, it can be difficult to perform anterior surgery because of the high risk of complications. This present report proposes a novel “greenstick fracture technique” to change the K-line from negative to positive in patients with cervical myelopathy, OPLL, and kyphotic deformity.

METHODS

Four patients with cervical myelopathy, continuous-type OPLL, and kyphotic sagittal alignment (who were K-line negative) were indicated for surgery. Posterior laminectomy and lateral mass screw insertions using a posterior approach were performed, followed by anterior surgery. Multilevel discectomy and thinning of the OPLL mass by bur drilling was performed, then an intentional greenstick fracture at each disc level was made to convert the cervical K-line from negative to positive. Finally, posterior instrumentation using a rod was carried out to maintain cervical lordosis.

RESULTS

MRI showed complete decompression of the cord by posterior migration in all cases, which had been caused by cervical lordosis. Restoration of neurological defects was confirmed at the 1-year follow-up assessment. No specific complications were identified that were associated with this technique.

CONCLUSIONS

A greenstick fracture technique may be effective and safe when applied to patients with cervical myelopathy, continuous-type OPLL, and kyphotic deformity (K-line negative). However, further studies with more cases will be required to reveal its generalizability and safety.

Full access

Choon Sung Lee, Chang Ju Hwang, Eic Ju Lim, Dong-Ho Lee and Jae Hwan Cho

OBJECTIVE

Postoperative shoulder imbalance (PSI) is a critical consideration after corrective surgery for a double thoracic curve (Lenke Type 2); however, the radiographic factors related to PSI remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the radiographic factors related to PSI after corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in patients with a double thoracic curve.

METHODS

This study included 80 patients with Lenke Type 2 AIS who underwent corrective surgery. Patients were grouped according to the presence [PSI(+)] or absence [PSI(−)] of shoulder imbalance at the final follow-up examination (differences of 20, 15, and 10 mm were used). Various radiographic parameters, including the Cobb angle of the proximal and middle thoracic curves (PTC and MTC), radiographic shoulder height (RSH), clavicle angle, T-1 tilt, trunk shift, and proximal and distal wedge angles (PWA and DWA), were assessed before and after surgery and compared between groups.

RESULTS

Overall, postoperative RSH decreased with time in the PSI(−) group but not in the PSI(+) group. Statistical analyses revealed that the preoperative Risser grade (p = 0.048), postoperative PWA (p = 0.028), and postoperative PTC/MTC ratio (p = 0.011) correlated with PSI. Presence of the adding-on phenomenon was also correlated with PSI, although this result was not statistically significant (p = 0.089).

CONCLUSIONS

Postoperative shoulder imbalance is common after corrective surgery for Lenke Type 2 AIS and correlates with a higher Risser grade, a larger postoperative PWA, and a higher postoperative PTC/MTC ratio. Presence of the distal adding-on phenomenon is associated with an increased PSI trend, although this result was not statistically significant. However, preoperative factors other than the Risser grade that affect the development of PSI were not identified by the study. Additional studies are required to reveal the risk factors for the development of PSI.

Restricted access

Dong-Yun Kim, Sang-Ho Lee, Jee Soo Jang, Sang Ki Chung and Ho-Yeon Lee

Object. The objectives of this study were to: 1) describe the incidence and clinical features of intravertebral vacuum phenomenon (IVVP) in a relatively large number of cases; 2) quantitatively evaluate intravertebral instability and determine the factors affecting instability; and 3) evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty in the treatment of this phenomenon.

Methods. A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 67 patients with IVVP among 652 consecutive cases of osteoporotic compression fracture. Comparisons between the IVVP group and a control group, a stable group, and an unstable group were conducted. Percutaneous vertebroplasty was performed in all patients.

There were 67 patients (10.3%) in whom there were 70 vacuum phenomena of the intravertebral space. Intravertebral vacuum phenomena occurred predominantly in the thoracolumbar junction (81%) and in patients with a longer duration of symptoms (10.6 ± 9.8 months) compared with the control group. Of 59 vertebrae for which flexion—extension radiographs were available, 26 vertebrae were categorized as stable and 33 as unstable. Twenty-one vertebrae (64%) had undergone compression fracture in the unstable group compared with nine (35%) compression fractures in the stable group. There were 28 (85%) fractures of the wedged vertebrae in the unstable group compared with 16 (61%) fractures in wedged vertebrae in the stable group. Percutaneous vertebroplasty was performed with successful clinical outcome.

Conclusions. Intravertebral vacuum phenomenon is more common than has been previously appreciated. The results of this study indicate that biomechanics, not ischemic or avascular theory, may play an important role in pathogenesis of this phenomenon. Percutaneous vertebroplasty was found to be a minimally invasive and effective procedure for the treatment of IVVP.