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Chang Kyu Park, Choon Keun Park, Dong Chan Lee, and Dong Geun Lee

OBJECT

In elderly patients with severe osteoporosis, instrumented lumbar interbody fusion may result in fixation failure or nonunion because of decreased pedicle screw pullout strength or increased interbody graft subsidence risk. Thus, given its many advantages, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with cement augmentation can be an effective method to use in elderly patients. The authors report on an easy, safe, and economical technique for bone cement augmentation using a bone biopsy needle inserted into the disc space in 2 osteoporotic patients who were treated with posterior interbody fusion and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation.

METHODS

Two elderly patients who complained of back pain and intermittent neurological claudication underwent posterior interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. After routinely assembling rods on the screws, a bone biopsy needle was inserted into the disc space via the operative field; the needle was then placed around the tips of the screws using fluoroscopic radiography for guidance. Bone cement was injected through the bone biopsy needle, also under fluoroscopic radiography guidance.

RESULTS

Both patients’ symptoms improved after the operation, and there was no evidence of cage subsidence or screw loosening at the 4-month follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

The indirect technique of bone cement augmentation via the disc space for percutaneous screw fixation could be an easy, safe, and economical method.

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Dong Yeob Lee, Tag-Geun Jung, and Sang-Ho Lee

Object

The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical outcomes in cases involving elderly patients who underwent single-level instrumented mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective review of 27 consecutive cases involving elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age) who underwent single-level instrumented mini-open TLIF and were followed up for at least 3 years. Degenerative spondylolisthesis was diagnosed in 16 patients, stenosis with instability in 8, and lytic spondylolisthesis in 3. All cases were Grade I or II based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists' classification system. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale, the Oswestry Disability Index, and patients' subjective satisfaction. Sagittal balance, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using plain radiography and 3D CT.

Results

The mean age of patients at the time of surgery was 69.3 years (range 65–80 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients (7.4%) in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 38.6 months (range 36–42 months), clinical success was achieved in 88.9% of cases. The mean segmental lordosis and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 11.9 and 33.5° to 13.9 and 37.2°, p = 0.024 and p = 0.001, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 77.8% of the patients. Adjacent segment deterioration was found in 44.4% of the patients. No patients underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. The development of ASD was significantly related to postoperative sacral tilt (p = 0.006).

Conclusions

Single-level instrumented mini-open TLIF yielded good clinical and radiological outcomes with a low complication rate in elderly patients.

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Dong Hyun Lee, Dong-Geun Lee, Jin Sub Hwang, Jae-Won Jang, Dae Hyeon Maeng, and Choon Keun Park

OBJECTIVE

Whereas the benefits of indirect decompression after lateral lumbar interbody fusion are well known, the effects of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) have not yet been verified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological effects of indirect decompression after ALIF for central spinal canal stenosis. In this report, along with the many advantages of the anterior approach, the authors share cases with good outcomes that they have encountered.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 64 consecutive patients who underwent ALIF for central spinal canal stenosis with instability and mixed foraminal stenosis between January 2015 and December 2018 at their hospital. Clinical assessments were performed using the visual analog scale score, the Oswestry Disability Index, and the modified Macnab criteria. The radiographic parameters were determined from pre- and postoperative cross-sectional MRI scans of the spinal canal and were compared to evaluate neural decompression after ALIF. The average follow-up period was 23.3 ± 1.3 months.

RESULTS

All clinical parameters, including the visual analog scale score, Oswestry Disability Index, and modified Macnab criteria, improved significantly. The mean operative duration was 254.8 ± 60.8 minutes, and the intraoperative bleeding volume was 179.8 ± 119.3 ml. In the radiological evaluation, radiological parameters of the cross-sections of the spinal canal showed substantial development. The spinal canal size improved by an average of 43.3% (p < 0.001) after surgery. No major complications occurred; however, aspiration guided by ultrasonography was performed in 2 patients because of a pseudocyst and fluid collection.

CONCLUSIONS

ALIF can serve as a suitable alternative to extensive posterior approaches. The authors suggest that ALIF can be used for decompression in central spinal canal stenosis as well as restoration of the foraminal dimensions, thus allowing decompression of the nerve roots.

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Dong-Kyu Jang, Kwan-Sung Lee, Hyoung Kyun Rha, Pil-Woo Huh, Ji-Ho Yang, Ik Seong Park, Jae-Geun Ahn, Jae Hoon Sung, and Young-Min Han

OBJECTIVE

In this study the authors evaluated whether extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery can prevent stroke occurrence and decrease mortality in adult patients with symptomatic moyamoya disease (MMD).

METHODS

The medical records of 249 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic MMD that was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography between 2002 and 2011 at 8 institutions were retrospectively reviewed. The study outcomes of stroke recurrence as a primary event and death during the 6-year follow-up and perioperative complications within 30 days as secondary events were compared between the bypass and medical treatment groups.

RESULTS

The bypass group comprised 158 (63.5%) patients, and the medical treatment group comprised 91 (36.5%) patients. For 249 adult patients with MMD, bypass surgery showed an HR of 0.48 (95% CI 0.27–0.86, p = 0.014) for stroke recurrence calculated by Cox regression analysis. However, for the 153 patients with ischemic MMD, the HR of bypass surgery for stroke recurrence was 1.07 (95% CI 0.43–2.66, p = 0.887). For the 96 patients with hemorrhagic MMD, the multivariable adjusted HR of bypass surgery for stroke recurrence was 0.18 (95% CI 0.06–0.49, p = 0.001). For the treatment modality, indirect bypass and direct bypass (or combined bypass) did not show any significant difference for stroke recurrence, perioperative stroke, or mortality (log rank; p = 0.524, p = 0.828, and p = 0.616, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

During the treatment of symptomatic MMD in adults, bypass surgery reduces stroke recurrence for the hemorrhagic type, but it does not do so for the ischemic type. The best choice of bypass methods in adult patients with MMD is uncertain. In adult ischemic MMD, a prospective randomized study to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of bypass surgery to prevent recurrent stroke is necessary.