Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Desmond A. Brown x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Benjamin T. Himes, Adip G. Bhargav, Desmond A. Brown, Timothy J. Kaufmann, Irina Bancos and Jamie J. Van Gompel

OBJECTIVE

Cushing’s disease arises from functioning adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)–secreting pituitary adenomas. These tumors can be very small and evade detection by MRI. Empty sella syndrome is a phenomenon by which an arachnoid outpouching of CSF into the sella leads to compression of the pituitary, likely due to intracranial hypertension (a common issue in Cushing’s disease), further leading to difficulty in visualizing the pituitary gland that may contribute to difficulty in finding a tumor on MRI, so-called MRI-negative Cushing’s disease. The authors sought to examine the association between empty sella syndrome and MRI-negative Cushing’s disease.

METHODS

A single-institution database of Cushing’s disease cases from 2000 to 2017 was reviewed, and 197 cases were included in the analysis. One hundred eighty patients had a tissue diagnosis of Cushing’s disease and 17 had remission with surgery, but no definitive tissue diagnosis was obtained. Macroadenomas (tumors > 1 cm) were excluded. The degree of empty sella syndrome was graded on the degree of CSF visualized in the sella on midline sagittal T1-weighted MRI.

RESULTS

Of the 197 cases identified, 40 (20%) presented with MRI-negative disease, and empty sella syndrome was present in 49 cases (25%). MRI-negative disease was found in 18 (37%) of 49 empty sella cases versus 22 (15%) of 148 cases without empty sella syndrome present. Empty sella syndrome was significantly associated with MRI-negative disease (OR 3.32, 95% CI 1.61–6.74, p = 0.0018). Decreased thickness of the pituitary gland was also associated with MRI-negative disease (mean thickness 5.6 vs 6.8 mm, p = 0.0002).

CONCLUSIONS

Empty sella syndrome is associated with an increased rate of MRI-negative Cushing’s disease. Pituitary compression causing a relative reduction in the volume of the pituitary for imaging is a plausible cause for not detecting the tumor mass with MRI.

Full access

Desmond A. Brown, Nicholas L. Deep, Colin L. Driscoll, Michael J. Link, Mark E. Jentoft and David J. Daniels

Epstein-Barr virus–associated smooth-muscle tumors are rare tumors seen in immunocompromised patients. Most cases occur in the context of AIDS and organ transplantation, and very rarely in the setting of congenital immunodeficiency, with only 5 case reports of the latter published so far in the literature. The authors report the case of a previously healthy 8-year-old girl with headaches and precocious puberty who was found to have a large skull base lesion. There was a synchronous left adrenal lesion. She underwent resection of the skull base lesion and a left adrenalectomy. Thorough evaluation for immunodeficiency was negative for a known congenital immunodeficiency syndrome. She had a short course of intravenous immunoglobulin and has had no recurrence of disease or new lesions in the 17 months since presentation. Continued surveillance for the development of opportunistic infections and new or recurrent lesions is warranted in this case. Repeat surgery for surgically accessible tumors or chemoradiation would be recommended for any additional lesions.

Free access

Jamie J. Van Gompel, Bryan T. Klassen, Gregory A. Worrell, Kendall H. Lee, Cheolsu Shin, Cong Zhi Zhao, Desmond A. Brown, Steven J. Goerss, Bruce A. Kall and Matt Stead

OBJECT

Anterior nuclear (AN) stimulation has been reported to reduce the frequency of seizures, in some cases dramatically; however, it has not been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The anterior nucleus is difficult to target because of its sequestered location, partially surrounded by the ventricle. It has traditionally been targeted by using transventricular or lateral transcortical routes. Here, the authors report a novel approach to targeting the anterior nucleus and neurophysiologically confirming effective stimulation of the target, namely evoked potentials in the hippocampus.

METHODS

Bilateral AN 3389 electrodes were placed in a novel trajectory followed by bilateral hippocampal 3391 electrodes from a posterior trajectory. Each patient was implanted bilaterally with a Medtronic Activa PC+S device under an investigational device exemption approval. Placement was confirmed with CT. AN stimulation-induced hippocampal evoked potentials were measured to functionally confirm placement in the anterior nucleus.

RESULTS

Two patients had implantations by way of a novel AN trajectory with concomitant hippocampal electrodes. There were no lead misplacements. Postoperative stimulation of the anterior nucleus with a PC+S device elicited evoked potentials in the hippocampus. Thus far, both patients have reported a > 50% improvement in seizure frequency.

CONCLUSIONS

Placing AN electrodes posteriorly may provide a safer trajectory than that used for traditionally placed AN electrodes. In addition, with a novel battery that is capable of electroencephalographic recording, evoked potentials can be used to functionally assess the Papez circuit. This treatment paradigm may offer increased AN stimulation efficacy for medically intractable epilepsy by assessing functional placement more effectively and thus far has proven safe.

Free access

Anshit Goyal, Yagiz U. Yolcu, Aakshit Goyal, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Desmond A. Brown, Christopher S. Graffeo, Sandy Goncalves, Terence C. Burns and Ian F. Parney

OBJECTIVE

With the revised WHO 2016 classification of brain tumors, there has been increasing interest in imaging biomarkers to predict molecular status and improve the yield of genetic testing for diffuse low-grade gliomas (LGGs). The T2-FLAIR–mismatch sign has been suggested to be a highly specific radiographic marker of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation and 1p/19q codeletion status in diffuse LGGs. The presence of T2-FLAIR mismatch indicates a T2-hyperintense lesion that is hypointense on FLAIR with the exception of a hyperintense rim.

METHODS

In accordance with PRISMA guidelines, we performed a systematic review of the Ovid Medline, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane databases for reports of studies evaluating the diagnostic performance of T2-FLAIR mismatch in predicting the IDH and 1p/19q codeletion status in diffuse LGGs. Results were combined into a 2 × 2 format, and the following diagnostic performance parameters were calculated: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and positive (LR+) and negative (LR−) likelihood ratios. In addition, we utilized Bayes theorem to calculate posttest probabilities as a function of known pretest probabilities from previous genome-wide association studies and the calculated LRs. Calculations were performed for 1) IDH mutation with 1p/19q codeletion (IDHmut-Codel), 2) IDH mutation without 1p/19q codeletion (IDHmut-Noncodel), 3) IDH mutation overall, and 4) 1p/19q codeletion overall. The QUADAS-2 (revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies) tool was utilized for critical appraisal of included studies.

RESULTS

A total of 4 studies were included, with inclusion of 2 separate cohorts from a study reporting testing and validation (n = 746). From pooled analysis of all cohorts, the following values were obtained for each molecular profile—IDHmut-Codel: sensitivity 30%, specificity 73%, LR+ 1.1, LR− 1.0; IDHmut-Noncodel: sensitivity 33.7%, specificity 98.5%, LR+ 22.5, LR− 0.7; IDH: sensitivity 32%, specificity 100%, LR+ 32.1, LR− 0.7; 1p/19q codeletion: sensitivity 0%, specificity 54%, LR+ 0.01, LR− 1.9. Bayes theorem was used to calculate the following posttest probabilities after a positive and negative result, respectively—IDHmut-Codel: 32.2% and 29.4%; IDHmut-Noncodel: 95% and 40%; IDH: 99.2% and 73.5%; 1p/19q codeletion: 0.4% and 35.1%.

CONCLUSIONS

The T2-FLAIR–mismatch sign was an insensitive but highly specific marker of IDH mutation and IDHmut-Noncodel profile, although significant exceptions may exist to this finding. Tumors with a positive sign may still be IDHwt or 1p/19q codeleted. These findings support the utility of T2-FLAIR mismatch as an imaging-based biomarker for positive selection of patients with IDH-mutant gliomas.

Restricted access

Victor M. Lu, Kyle P. O’Connor, Benjamin T. Himes, Desmond A. Brown, Cody L. Nesvick, Ruby G. Siada, Toba N. Niazi, Jonathan Schwartz and David J. Daniels

OBJECTIVE

Glioblastoma (GBM) during infancy is rare, and the clinical outcomes of congenital GBM are not well understood. Correspondingly, the aim of this study was to present a long-term survivor case from the authors’ institution, and establish an integrated cohort of cases across the published literature to better understand the clinical course of this disease in this setting.

METHODS

The authors report the outcomes of an institutional case of congenital GBM diagnosed within the first 3 months of life, and performed a comprehensive literature search for published cases from 2000 onward for an integrated survival analysis. All cases were integrated into 1 cohort, and Kaplan-Meier estimations, Fisher’s exact test, and logistic regression were used to interrogate the data.

RESULTS

The integrated cohort of 40 congenital GBM cases consisted of 23 (58%) females and 17 (42%) males born at a median gestational age of 38 weeks (range 22–40 weeks). Estimates of overall survival (OS) at 1 month was 67%, at 1 year it was 59%, and at 10 years it was 45%, with statistically superior outcomes for subgroups in which patients survived to be treated by resection and chemotherapy. In the overall cohort, multivariable analysis confirmed resection (p < 0.01) and chemotherapy (p < 0.01) as independent predictors of superior OS. Gestational age > 38 weeks (p < 0.01), Apgar scores ≥ 7 at 5 minutes (p < 0.01), absence of prenatal hydrocephalus (p < 0.01), and vaginal delivery (p < 0.01) were associated with greater odds of surgical diagnosis versus autopsy diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS

Congenital GBM can deviate from the expected poor prognosis of adult GBM in terms of OS. Both resection and chemotherapy confer statistically superior prognostic advantages in those patients who survive within the immediate postnatal period, and should be first-line considerations in the initial management of this rare disease.

Restricted access

Lorenzo Rinaldo, Desmond A. Brown, Adip G. Bhargav, Aaron E. Rusheen, Ryan M. Naylor, Hannah E. Gilder, Dileep D. Monie, Stephanie J. Youssef and Ian F. Parney

OBJECTIVE

The authors sought to investigate the incidence and predictors of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) after craniotomy for tumor resection, which are not well established, and the efficacy of and risks associated with VTE chemoprophylaxis, which remains controversial.

METHODS

The authors investigated the incidence of VTEs in a consecutive series of patients presenting to the authors’ institution for resection of an intracranial lesion between 2012 and 2017. Information on patient and tumor characteristics was collected and independent predictors of VTEs were determined using stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. Review of the literature was performed by searching MEDLINE using the keywords “venous thromboembolism,” “deep venous thrombosis,” “pulmonary embolism,” “craniotomy,” and “brain neoplasms.”

RESULTS

There were 1622 patients included for analysis. A small majority of patients were female (52.6%) and the mean age of the cohort was 52.9 years (SD 15.8 years). A majority of intracranial lesions were intraaxial (59.3%). The incidence of VTEs was 3.0% and the rates of deep venous thromboses and pulmonary emboli were 2.3% and 0.9%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, increasing patient age (unit OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00–1.05; p = 0.018), history of VTE (OR 7.26, 95% CI 3.24–16.27; p < 0.001), presence of motor deficit (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.43–4.88; p = 0.002), postoperative intracranial hemorrhage (OR 4.35, 95% CI 1.51–12.55; p < 0.001), and prolonged intubation or reintubation (OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.28–8.32; p < 0.001) were independently associated with increased odds of a VTE. There were 192 patients who received VTE chemoprophylaxis (11.8%); the mean postoperative day of chemoprophylaxis initiation was 4.6 (SD 3.8). The incidence of VTEs was higher in patients receiving chemoprophylaxis than in patients not receiving chemoprophylaxis (8.3% vs 2.2%; p < 0.001). There were 30 instances of clinically significant postoperative hemorrhage (1.9%), with only 1 hemorrhage occurring after initiation of VTE chemoprophylaxis (0.1%).

CONCLUSIONS

The study results show the incidence and predictors of VTEs after craniotomy for tumor resection in this patient population. The incidence of VTE within this cohort appears low and comparable to that observed in other institutional series, despite the lack of routine prophylactic anticoagulation in the postoperative setting.

Restricted access

Salomon Cohen-Cohen, Desmond A. Brown, Benjamin T. Himes, Lydia P. Wheeler, Michael W. Ruff, Brittny T. Major, Naykky M. Singh Ospina, John L. D. Atkinson, Fredric B. Meyer, Irina Bancos, William F. Young Jr. and Jamie J. Van Gompel

OBJECTIVE

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare, autosomal-dominant tumor disorder characterized by the development of pituitary tumors and other endocrine neoplasms. Diagnosis is made clinically based on the development of 2 or more canonical lesions (parathyroid gland, anterior pituitary, and enteropancreatic tumors) or in family members of a patient with a clinical diagnosis of MEN1 and the occurrence of one of the MEN1-associated tumors. The goal of this study was to characterize pituitary tumors arising in the setting of MEN1 at a single institution. The probability of tumor progression and the likelihood of surgical intervention in patients with asymptomatic nonfunctional pituitary adenomas were also analyzed.

METHODS

A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained institutional database was performed for patients with MEN1 diagnosed from 1970 to 2017. Data included patient demographics, tumor characteristics, treatment strategies, and outcomes.

RESULTS

A review of the database identified 268 patients diagnosed with MEN1, of whom 158 (59%) were female. Among the 268 patients, 139 (51.8%) had pituitary adenomas. There was a higher prevalence in women than in men (65% vs 35%, p < 0.005). Functional adenomas (57%) were more common. Prolactin-secreting adenomas were the most common functional tumors. Macroadenomas were seen in 27% of patients and were more likely to be symptomatic and locally aggressive (p < 0.001). Forty-nine patients (35%) underwent transsphenoidal resection at some point during their disease course. In 52 patients who were initially observed with MEN1 asymptomatic nonfunctional adenomas, only 5 (10%) progressed to need surgery. In MEN1 patients, an initial parathyroid lesion is most likely followed in order by pituitary, pancreatic, adrenal, and, finally, rare carcinoid tumors.

CONCLUSIONS

Asymptomatic nonfunctional pituitary adenomas in patients with MEN1 may be followed safely with MRI. In this series, parathyroid tumors developed at the lowest median age of all cardinal tumors, and development of additional cardinal MEN1 lesions followed a predictable pattern. This pattern of disease progression could have significant implications for disease surveillance in clinical practice and may help to target clinical resources to the lesions most likely to develop next. This may aid with early detection and treatment and warrants further study.