Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Dennis London x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Roee Ber, Dennis London, Samya Senan, Yasmin Youssefi, David H. Harter, John G. Golfinos, and Donato Pacione

OBJECTIVE

Miscommunication and poor coordination among surgical teams are known causes of preventable medical harms and operating room inefficiencies and inhibit surgical training. Technology may help overcome these challenges. This study used the personal experience of one of the authors as a former Air Force F-15 pilot to design a combat aviation pre- and postoperative communication workflow in the neurosurgery department and tested its effect on safety, efficiency, and education. The authors hypothesized that the adoption of this workflow through a tailored technological platform will increase compliance and improve the chances of sustainability.

METHODS

Data were prospectively collected from neurosurgery cases before (January–May 2020) and after (June–October 2020) implementation of this workflow. Briefing and debriefing were executed using a custom mobile platform and were defined as nonmandatory for all participants. All faculty and residents who operated at NYU Langone Medical Center (Tisch campus) during the intervention period were enrolled on the platform. Primary outcomes were morbidity and mortality per the department’s criteria, and intraoperative last-minute requests as reported by operating room staff in a double-blinded fashion. Secondary outcomes were user responses on the subjective questionnaires.

RESULTS

Data were collected from 637 and 893 cases during the preintervention and intervention periods, respectively. The average briefing rates for residents and surgeons were 71% and 81%, respectively, and the average debriefing rates for residents and surgeons were 67% and 88%. There was no significant difference in preoperative risk score between the preintervention and intervention patient populations (p = 0.24). The rate of intraoperative last-minute requests significantly decreased from 16.6% (35/211) to 10.5% (35/334, p = 0.048). There was no significant change in morbidity and mortality between the preintervention and intervention periods. On subjective questionnaires there was a statistically significant improvement in safety, efficiency, and educational aspects of the cases during the intervention period.

CONCLUSIONS

Implementation of aviation-like structured team communication practices in the neurosurgery department through a technological platform improved education and communication between surgical teams and led to a reduction in last-minute surgical requests that could impact costs.

Restricted access

Dennis London, Ben Birkenfeld, Joel Thomas, Marat Avshalumov, Alon Y. Mogilner, Steven Falowski, and Antonios Mammis

OBJECTIVE

The human myotome is fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders. However, this map was largely constructed decades ago, and its breadth, variability, and reliability remain poorly described, limiting its practical use.

METHODS

The authors used a novel method to reconstruct the myotome map in patients (n = 42) undergoing placement of dorsal root ganglion electrodes for the treatment of chronic pain. They electrically stimulated nerve roots (n = 79) in the intervertebral foramina at T12–S1 and measured triggered electromyography responses.

RESULTS

L4 and L5 stimulation resulted in quadriceps muscle (62% and 33% of stimulations, respectively) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle (25% and 67%, respectively) activation, while S1 stimulation resulted in gastrocnemius muscle activation (46%). However, L5 and S1 both resulted in abductor hallucis (AH) muscle activation (17% and 31%), L5 stimulation resulted in gastrocnemius muscle stimulation (42%), and S1 stimulation in TA muscle activation (38%). The authors also mapped the breadth of the myotome in individual patients, finding coactivation of adductor and quadriceps, quadriceps and TA, and TA and gastrocnemius muscles under L3, L4, and both L5 and S1 stimulation, respectively. While the AH muscle was commonly activated by S1 stimulation, this rarely occurred together with TA or gastrocnemius muscle activation. Other less common coactivations were also observed throughout T12–S1 stimulation.

CONCLUSIONS

The muscular innervation of the lumbosacral nerve roots varies significantly from the classic myotome map and between patients. Furthermore, in individual patients, each nerve root may innervate a broader range of muscles than is commonly assumed. This finding is important to prevent misdiagnosis of radicular pathologies.

Restricted access

Dennis London, Dev N. Patel, Bernadine Donahue, Ralph E. Navarro, Jason Gurewitz, Joshua S. Silverman, Erik Sulman, Kenneth Bernstein, Amy Palermo, John G. Golfinos, Joshua K. Sabari, Elaine Shum, Vamsidhar Velcheti, Abraham Chachoua, and Douglas Kondziolka

OBJECTIVE

Patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) metastatic to the brain are living longer. The risk of new brain metastases when these patients stop systemic therapy is unknown. The authors hypothesized that the risk of new brain metastases remains constant for as long as patients are off systemic therapy.

METHODS

A prospectively collected registry of patients undergoing radiosurgery for brain metastases was analyzed. Of 606 patients with NSCLC, 63 met the inclusion criteria of discontinuing systemic therapy for at least 90 days and undergoing active surveillance. The risk factors for the development of new tumors were determined using Cox proportional hazards and recurrent events models.

RESULTS

The median duration to new brain metastases off systemic therapy was 16.0 months. The probability of developing an additional new tumor at 6, 12, and 18 months was 26%, 40%, and 53%, respectively. There were no additional new tumors 22 months after stopping therapy. Patients who discontinued therapy due to intolerance or progression of the disease and those with mutations in RAS or receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways (e.g., KRAS, EGFR) were more likely to develop new tumors (hazard ratio [HR] 2.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33–3.81, p = 2.5 × 10−3; HR 2.51, 95% CI 1.45–4.34, p = 9.8 × 10−4, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

The rate of new brain metastases from NSCLC in patients off systemic therapy decreases over time and is uncommon 2 years after cessation of cancer therapy. Patients who stop therapy due to toxicity or who have RAS or RTK pathway mutations have a higher rate of new metastases and should be followed more closely.