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  • Author or Editor: Davis P. Argersinger x
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John D. Heiss, Aria Jamshidi, Smit Shah, Staci Martin, Pamela L. Wolters, Davis P. Argersinger, Katherine E. Warren and Russell R. Lonser

OBJECTIVE

In this clinical trial report, the authors analyze safety and infusion distribution of IL13-Pseudomonas exotoxin, an antitumor chimeric molecule, administered via intratumoral convection enhanced delivery (CED) in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG).

METHODS

This was a Phase I single-institution, open-label, dose-escalation, safety and tolerability study of IL13-PE38QQR infused via single-catheter CED into 5 pediatric DIPG patients. IL13-PE38QQR was administered to regions of tumor selected by radiographic findings. Two escalating dose levels were evaluated: 0.125 µg/mL in cohort 1 and 0.25 µg/mL in cohort 2. Real-time MRI was performed during intratumoral infusions, and MRI and MR spectroscopy were performed before and after the infusions. Clinical evaluations, including parent-reported quality of life (QOL), were assessed at baseline and 4 weeks post-infusion.

RESULTS

Direct infusion of brainstem tumor with IL13-PE using the CED technique in patients with DIPG produced temporary arrest of disease progression in 2 of 5 patients, both of whom subsequently received a second infusion. All 5 patients showed signs of disease progression by 12 weeks after initial infusion. Two patients experienced transient cranial nerve deficits and lethargy after infusion, and these deficits resolved with corticosteroid treatment in both cases. No patient had radiographic evidence of acute or long-term treatment toxicity. Parent-reported QOL was consistent with medical outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

Even though IL13-PE delivered by CED did not reach the entire MRI-defined tumor volume in any patient, short-term radiographic antitumor effects were observed in 2 of the 5 patients treated. The patients’ performance status did not improve. Drug delivery using multiple catheters may produce improved outcomes.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00088061 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Davis P. Argersinger, Stuart Walbridge, Nicholas M. Wetjen, Alexander O. Vortmeyer, Tianxia Wu, John A. Butman and John D. Heiss

OBJECTIVE

Botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A) was reported to raise the seizure threshold when injected into the seizure focus of a kindled rodent model. Delivering BoNT/A to the nonhuman primate (NHP) central nervous system via convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has not been performed. The objective of this study was to determine the toxicity and distribution characteristics of CED of BoNT/A into the NHP hippocampus and cisterna magna.

METHODS

Escalating BoNT/A doses were delivered by CED into the NHP hippocampus (n = 4) and cisterna magna (n = 5) for behavioral and histological assessment and to determine the highest nonlethal dose (LD0) and median lethal dose (LD50). Hippocampal BoNT/A was coinfused with Gd-albumin, a surrogate MRI tracer. Gd-albumin and radioiodinated BoNT/A (125I-BoNT/A) were coinfused into the hippocampus of 3 additional NHPs to determine BoNT/A distribution by in vivo MRI and postmortem quantitative autoradiography. Scintillation counting of CSF assessed the flow of 125I-BoNT/A from the hippocampus to CSF postinfusion.

RESULTS

LD0 and LD50 were 4.2 and 18 ng/kg, and 5 and > 5 ng/kg for the NHP hippocampus and cisterna magna, respectively. Gd-albumin and 125I-BoNT/A completely perfused the hippocampus (155–234 mm3) in 4 of 7 NHPs. Fifteen percent of BoNT/A entered CSF after hippocampal infusion. The MRI distribution volume of coinfused Gd-albumin (VdMRI) was similar to the quantitative autoradiography distribution of 125I-BoNT/A (VdQAR) (mean VdMRI = 139.5 mm3 [n = 7]; VdQAR = 134.8 mm3 [n = 3]; r = 1.00, p < 0.0001). No infusion-related toxicity was identified histologically except that directly attributable to needle placement.

CONCLUSIONS

Gd-albumin accurately tracked BoNT/A distribution on MRI. BoNT/A did not produce CNS toxicity. BoNT/A LD0 exceeded 10-fold the dose administered safely to humans for cosmesis and dystonia.