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M. Harrison Snyder, David T. Asuzu, Dawn E. Shaver, Mary Lee Vance, and John A. Jane Jr.

OBJECTIVE

Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is a common problem during the postoperative course after pituitary surgery. Although treatment of this condition is well characterized, prevention strategies are less studied and reported. The authors sought to characterize outcomes and predictive factors of SIADH after implementation of routine postoperative fluid restriction for patients undergoing endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenoma.

METHODS

In March 2018, routine postoperative fluid restriction to 1000 ml/day for 7 days was instituted for all patients who underwent surgery for pituitary adenoma. These patients were compared with patients who underwent surgery for pituitary adenoma between March 2016 and March 2018, prior to implementation of routine fluid restriction. Patients with preoperative history of diabetes insipidus (DI) or concern for postsurgical DI were excluded. Patients were followed by neuroendocrinologists and neurosurgeons, and sodium levels were checked between 7 and 10 days postoperatively. SIADH was defined by a serum sodium level less than 136 mmol/L, with or without symptoms within 10 days after surgery. Thirty-day readmission was recorded and reviewed to determine underlying reasons.

RESULTS

In total, 82 patients in the fluid-unrestricted cohort and 135 patients in the fluid-restricted cohort were analyzed. The patients in the fluid-restricted cohort had a significantly lower rate of postoperative SIADH than patients in the fluid-unrestricted cohort (5% vs 15%, adjusted OR [95% CI] 0.1 [0.0–0.6], p = 0.01). Higher BMI was associated with lower rate of postoperative SIADH (adjusted OR [95%] 0.9 [0.9–1.0], p = 0.03), whereas female sex was associated with higher rate of SIADH (adjusted OR [95% CI] 3.1 [1.1–9.8], p = 0.03). There was no difference in the 30-day readmission rates between patients in the fluid-unrestricted and fluid-restricted cohorts (4% vs 7%, adjusted OR [95% CI] 0.5 [0–5.1], p = 0.56). Thirty-day readmission was more likely for patients with history of hypertension (adjusted OR [95% CI] 5.7 [1.3–26.3], p = 0.02) and less likely for White patients (adjusted OR [95% CI] 0.3 [0.1–0.9], p = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS

Routine fluid restriction reduced the rate of SIADH in patients who underwent surgery for pituitary adenoma but was not associated with reduction in 30-day readmission rate.

Open access

David T. Asuzu, Rebecca M. Burke, Jeffrey Hakim, Dylan Coss, Min S. Park, Spencer C. Payne, and John A. Jane Jr.

BACKGROUND

Giant pituitary macroadenomas with a diameter >4 cm are rare tumors, accounting for only about 5% of pituitary adenomas. They are more difficult to maximally resect safely owing to limited access as well as encasement of adjacent structures. Acidophil stem cell adenomas are rare immature neoplasms proposed to derive from common progenitor cells of somatotroph and lactotroph cells. These adenomas comprise about 4.3% of surgically removed pituitary adenomas. No previous reports have described acidophil stem cell adenomas that grow to the size of giant macroadenomas. This rare entity poses special challenges given the need for maximal safe resection in an immature neoplasm.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors report a 21-year-old female who presented with 3 years of progressive visual decline and a giant macroadenoma. She underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for decompression. Given the tumor size and involvement of adjacent critical structures, gross-total resection was not achieved. The authors review the literature on giant pituitary adenomas and provide a discussion on clinical management for this rare entity.

LESSONS

The authors present a very rare case of a giant pituitary adenoma of acidophil stem cell origin and discuss the technical and management challenges in this rare entity.

Open access

Armin Mortazavi, Diana Nwokoye, David T. Asuzu, Gretchen Scott, Panagiotis Mastorakos, and Prashant Chittiboina

BACKGROUND

Brainstem and spinal cord hemangioblastomas are a common manifestation of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease. Cysts and associated syringes are the most common cause of significant morbidity in these patients. Surgical treatment of symptomatic hemangioblastomas are often complicated by the presence of multiple potential lesions, leading to cyst and syrinx formation.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a case of a patient with multiple VHL-related hemangioblastomas who presented with syringobulbia and holocord syrinx. Resection of two cyst wall hemangioblastomas and one cervical hemangioblastoma only transiently improved syringobulbia. Eventual resolution of syringobulbia and collapse of the holocord syrinx only occurred following removal of a large lower thoracic hemangioblastoma.

LESSONS

Surgical management of hemangioblastomas and associated cysts in patients with VHL should only target lesions most likely contributing to neurological deficits as excess surgical intervention risks treatment-related morbidity. The authors illustrate how anatomical and pathophysiological considerations as well as patient symptoms are key to identifying target lesions for resection and developing deliberate treatment plans.

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David T. Asuzu, Jonathan J. Yun, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Andrew K. Chan, Cheerag D. Upadhyaya, Domagoj Coric, Eric A. Potts, Erica F. Bisson, Jay D. Turner, Jack J. Knightly, Kai-Ming Fu, Kevin T. Foley, Luis Tumialan, Mark Shaffrey, Mohamad Bydon, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Paul Park, Scott Meyer, Anthony L. Asher, Oren N. Gottfried, Khoi D. Than, Michael Y. Wang, and Avery L. Buchholz

OBJECTIVE

Degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) results in significant morbidity. The duration of symptoms prior to surgical intervention may be associated with postoperative surgical outcomes and functional recovery. The authors’ objective was to investigate whether delayed surgical treatment for DCM is associated with worsened postoperative outcomes.

METHODS

Data from 1036 patients across 14 surgical centers in the Quality Outcomes Database were analyzed. Baseline demographic characteristics and findings of preoperative and postoperative symptom evaluations, including duration of symptoms, were assessed. Postoperative functional outcomes were measured using the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale. Symptom duration was classified as either less than 12 months or 12 months or greater. Univariable and multivariable regression were used to evaluate for the associations between symptom duration and postoperative outcomes.

RESULTS

In this study, 513 patients (49.5%) presented with symptom duration < 12 months, and 523 (50.5%) had symptoms for 12 months or longer. Patients with longer symptom duration had higher BMI and higher prevalence of anxiety and diabetes (all p < 0.05). Symptom duration ≥ 12 months was associated with higher average baseline NDI score (41 vs 36, p < 0.01). However, improvements in NDI scores from baseline were not significantly different between groups at 3 months (p = 0.77) or 12 months (p = 0.51). Likewise, the authors found no significant differences between groups in changes in mJOA scores from baseline to 3 months or 12 months (both p > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Surgical intervention resulted in improved mJOA and NDI scores at 3 months, and this improvement was sustained in both patients with short and longer initial symptom duration. Patients with DCM can still undergo successful surgical management despite delayed presentation.

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David T. Asuzu, Adomas Bunevicius, Rithika Kormath Anand, Mohanad Suleiman, Ahmed M. Nabeel, Wael A. Reda, Sameh R. Tawadros, Khaled Abdel Karim, Amr M. N. El-Shehaby, Reem M. Emad Eldin, Tomas Chytka, Roman Liščák, Kimball Sheehan, Darrah Sheehan, Marco Perez Caceres, David Mathieu, Cheng-chia Lee, Huai-che Yang, Piero Picozzi, Andrea Franzini, Luca Attuati, Herwin Speckter, Jeremy Olivo, Samir Patel, Christopher P. Cifarelli, Daniel T. Cifarelli, Joshua D. Hack, Ben A. Strickland, Gabriel Zada, Eric L. Chang, Kareem R. Fakhoury, Chad G. Rusthoven, Ronald E. Warnick, and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Resection of meningiomas in direct contact with the anterior optic apparatus carries risk of injury to the visual pathway. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) offers a minimally invasive alternative. However, its use is limited owing to the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy. Few SRS studies have specifically assessed the risks and benefits of treating meningiomas in direct contact with the optic nerve, chiasm, or optic tract. The authors hypothesized that SRS is safe for select patients with meningiomas in direct contact with the anterior optic apparatus.

METHODS

The authors performed an international multicenter retrospective analysis of 328 patients across 11 institutions. All patients had meningiomas in direct contract with the optic apparatus. Patients were followed for a median duration of 56 months after SRS. Neurological examinations, including visual function evaluations, were performed at follow-up visits. Clinical and treatment variables were collected at each site according to protocol. Tumor volumes were assessed with serial MR imaging. Variables predictive of visual deficit were identified using univariable and multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS

SRS was the initial treatment modality for 64.6% of patients, and 93% of patients received SRS as a single fraction. Visual information was available for 302 patients. Of these patients, visual decline occurred in 29 patients (9.6%), of whom 12 (41.4%) had evidence of tumor progression. Visual decline in the remaining 17 patients (5.6%) was not associated with tumor progression. Pre-SRS Karnofsky Performance Status predicted visual decline in adjusted analysis (adjusted OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.9–1.0, p < 0.01). Follow-up imaging data were available for 322 patients. Of these patients, 294 patients (91.3%) had radiographic evidence of stability or tumor regression at last follow up. Symptom duration was associated with tumor progression in adjusted analysis (adjusted OR 1.01, adjusted 95% CI 1.0–1.02, adjusted p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

In this international multicenter study, the vast majority of patients exhibited tumor control and preservation of visual function when SRS was used to treat meningioma in direct contact with the anterior optic pathways. SRS is a relatively safe treatment modality for select patients with perioptic meningiomas in direct contact with the optic apparatus.