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Reid Hoshide, Mark Calayag, Hal Meltzer, Michael L. Levy and David Gonda

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is an established and effective treatment for obstructive hydrocephalus. In its most common application, surgeons plan their entry point and the endoscope trajectory for the procedure based on anatomical landmarks, then control the endoscope freehand. Recent studies report an incidence of neural injuries as high as 16.6% of all ETVs performed in North America. The authors have introduced the ROSA system to their ETV procedure to stereotactically optimize endoscope trajectories, to reduce risk of traction on neural structures by the endoscope, and to provide a stable mechanical holder of the endoscope. Here, they present their series in which the ROSA system was used for ETVs.

METHODS

At the authors’ institution, they performed ETVs with the ROSA system in 9 consecutive patients within an 8-month period. Patients had to have a favorable expected response to ETV (ETV Success Score ≥ 70) with no additional endoscopic procedures (e.g., choroid plexus cauterization, septum pellucidum fenestration). The modality of image registration (CT, MRI, surface mapping, or bone fiducials) was dependent on the case.

RESULTS

Nine pediatric patients with an age range of 1.5 to 16 years, 4 girls and 5 boys, with ETV Success Scores ranging from 70 to 90, underwent successful ETV surgery with the ROSA system within an 8-month period. Their intracranial pathologies included tectal tumors (n = 3), communicating hydrocephalus from hemorrhage or meningeal disease (n = 2), congenital aqueductal stenosis (n = 1), compressive porencephalic cyst (n = 1), Chiari I malformation (n = 1), and pineal region mass (n = 1). Robotic assistance was limited to the ventricular access in the first 2 procedures, but was used for the entirety of the procedure for the following 7 cases. Four of these cases were combined with another procedural objective (3 stereotactic tectal mass biopsies, 1 Chiari decompression). A learning curve was observed with each subsequent surgery as registration and surgical times became shorter and more efficient. All patients had complete resolution of their preprocedural symptoms. There were no complications.

CONCLUSIONS

The ROSA system provides a stable, precise, and minimally invasive approach to ETVs.

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Thomas J. Gianaris, Ryan Nazar, Emily Middlebrook, David D. Gonda, Andrew Jea and Daniel H. Fulkerson

OBJECTIVE

Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is a surgical alternative to placing a CSF shunt in certain patients with hydrocephalus. The ETV Success Score (ETVSS) is a reliable, simple method to estimate the success of the procedure by 6 months of postoperative follow-up. The highest score is 90, estimating a 90% chance of the ETV effectively treating hydrocephalus without requiring a shunt. Treatment with ETV fails in certain patients, despite their being the theoretically best candidates for the procedure. In this study the authors attempted to identify factors that further predicted success in patients with the highest ETVSSs.

METHODS

A retrospective review was performed of all patients treated with ETV at 3 institutions. Demographic, radiological, and clinical data were recorded. All patients by definition were older than 1 year, had obstructive hydrocephalus, and did not have a prior shunt. Failure of ETV was defined as the need for a shunt by 1 year. The ETV was considered a success if the patient did not require another surgery (either shunt placement or a repeat endoscopic procedure) by 1 year. A statistical analysis was performed to identify factors associated with success or failure.

RESULTS

Fifty-nine patients met the entry criteria for the study. Eleven patients (18.6%) required further surgery by 1 year. All of these patients received a shunt. The presenting symptom of lethargy statistically correlated with success (p = 0.0126, odds ratio [OR] = 0.072). The preoperative radiological finding of transependymal flow (p = 0.0375, OR 0.158) correlated with success. A postoperative larger maximum width of the third ventricle correlated with failure (p = 0.0265).

CONCLUSIONS

The preoperative findings of lethargy and transependymal flow statistically correlated with success. This suggests that the best candidates for ETV are those with a relatively acute elevation of intracranial pressure. Cases without these findings may represent the failures in this highly selected group.

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Meng Huang, David D. Gonda, Valentina Briceño, Sandi K. Lam, Thomas G. Luerssen and Andrew Jea

Upper airway obstruction resulting from overflexion of the craniocervical junction after occipitocervical fusion is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication and is associated with morbidity. The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records and diagnostic images of 2 pediatrie patients who underwent occipitocervical fusion by the Neuro-Spine Program at Texas Children’s Hospital and experienced dyspnea and/or dysphagia from new upper airway obstruction in the postoperative period. Patient demographics, operative data, and preoperative and postoperative occiput-C2 angles were recorded. A review of the literature for similar complications after occipitocervical fusion was performed. A total of 13 cases of prolonged upper airway obstruction after occipitocervical fusion were analyzed. Most of these cases involved adults with rheumatoid arthritis. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there have been no previous reports of prolonged upper airway obstruction in children after an occipitocervical fusion. Fixation of the neck in increased flexion (−18° to −5°) was a common finding among these adult and pediatrie cases. The authors’ cases involved children with micrognathia and comparatively large tongues, which may predispose the oropharynx to obstruction with even the slightest amount of increased flexion. Close attention to a satisfactory fixation angle (occiput-C2 angle) is necessary to avoid airway obstruction after an occipitocervical fusion. Children with micrognathia are particularly sensitive to changes in flexion at the craniocervical junction after occipitocervical fixation.

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Jeffrey A. Steinberg, David D. Gonda, Karra Muller and Joseph D. Ciacci

Intramedullary spinal cord hematomas are a rare neurosurgical pathological entity typically arising from vascular and neoplastic lesions. Endometriosis is an extremely rare cause of intramedullary spinal cord hematoma, with only 5 previously reported cases in the literature. Endometriosis is characterized by ectopic endometrial tissue, typically located in the female pelvic cavity, that causes a cyclical pain syndrome, bleeding, and infertility. In the rare case of intramedullary endometriosis of the spinal cord, symptoms include cyclical lower-extremity radiculopathies and voiding difficulties, and can acutely cause cauda equina syndrome. The authors report a case of endometriosis of the conus medullaris, the first to include radiological, intraoperative, and histopathological imaging. A brief review of the literature is also presented, with discussion including etiological theories surrounding intramedullary endometriosis.

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David D. Gonda, Jared Fridley, Sheila L. Ryan, Valentina Briceño, Sandi K. Lam, MD MBA, Thomas G. Luerssen and Andrew Jea

OBJECT

Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), mainly enoxaparin, offer several advantages over standard anticoagulation therapies such as unfractionated heparin and warfarin, including predictable pharmacokinetics, minimal monitoring, and subcutaneous administration. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of LMWHs in pediatric neurosurgical patients.

METHODS

A retrospective study was performed with patients 18 years old or younger who were admitted to the Pediatric Neurosurgery Service at Texas Children's Hospital and treated with LMWH for either therapeutic or prophylactic purposes between March 1, 2011, and December 30, 2013. Demographic and clinical features and outcomes were recorded.

RESULTS

LMWH was administered for treatment of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) in 17 children and for prophylaxis in 24 children. Clinical resolution of VTEs occurred in 100% (17 of 17) of patients receiving therapeutic doses of LMWH. No patient receiving prophylactic doses of LMWH developed a new VTE. Major or minor bleeding complications occurred in 18% (3 of 17 children) and 4% (1 of 24 children) of those receiving therapeutic and prophylactic doses, respectively. All 4 patients who experienced hemorrhagic complications had other bleeding risk factors—i.e., coagulopathies and antiplatelet medications.

CONCLUSIONS

LMWH seems to be safe and efficacious for both management and prophylaxis of VTEs in pediatric neurosurgery. However, pediatric practitioners should be aware of higher risk for bleeding complications with increasing doses of LMWH, especially in patients with preexisting bleeding disorders or concurrent use of antiplatelet agents.

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Virendra Desai, David Gonda, Sheila L. Ryan, Valentina Briceño, Sandi K. Lam, Thomas G. Luerssen, Sohail H. Syed and Andrew Jea

OBJECT

Several studies have indicated that the 30-day morbidity and mortality risks are higher among pediatric and adult patients who are admitted on the weekends. This “weekend effect” has been observed among patients admitted with and fora variety of diagnoses and procedures, including myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, stroke, peptic ulcer disease, and pediatric surgery. In this study, morbidity and mortality outcomes for emergency pediatric neurosurgical procedures carried out on the weekend or after hours are compared with emergency surgical procedures performed during regular weekday business hours.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of operative data was conducted. Between December 1, 2011, and August 20, 2014, a total of 710 urgent or emergency neurosurgical procedures were performed at Texas Children’s Hospital in children younger than than 18 years of age. These procedures were then stratified into 3 groups: weekday regular hours, weekday after hours, and weekend hours. By cross-referencing these events with a prospectively collected morbidity and mortality database, the impact of the day and time on complication incidence was examined. Outcome metrics were compared using logistic regression models.

RESULTS

The weekday regular hours and after-hours (weekday after hours and weekends) surgery groups consisted of 341 and 239 patients and 434 and 276 procedures, respectively. There were no significant differences in the types of cases performed (p = 0.629) or baseline preoperative health status as determined by American Society of Anesthesiologists classifications (p = 0.220) between the 2 cohorts. After multivariate adjustment and regression, children undergoing emergency neurosurgical procedures during weekday after hours or weekends were more likely to experience complications (p = 0.0227).

CONCLUSIONS

Weekday after-hours and weekend emergency pediatric neurosurgical procedures are associated with significantly increased 30-day morbidity and mortality risk compared with procedures performed during weekday regular hours.

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Brandon A. McCutcheon, David C. Chang, Logan Marcus, David D. Gonda, Abraham Noorbakhsh, Clark C. Chen, Mark A. Talamini and Bob S. Carter

OBJECT

This study was designed to assess the relationship between insurance status and likelihood of receiving a neurosurgical procedure following admission for either extraaxial intracranial hemorrhage or spinal vertebral fracture.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS; 1998–2009) was performed. Cases of traumatic extraaxial intracranial hematoma and spinal vertebral fracture were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes. Within this cohort, those patients receiving a craniotomy or spinal fusion and/or decompression in the context of an admission for traumatic brain or spine injury, respectively, were identified using the appropriate ICD-9 procedure codes.

RESULTS

A total of 190,412 patients with extraaxial intracranial hematoma were identified between 1998 and 2009. Within this cohort, 37,434 patients (19.7%) received a craniotomy. A total of 477,110 patients with spinal vertebral fracture were identified. Of these, 37,302 (7.8%) received a spinal decompression and/or fusion. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient demographics, severity of injuries, comorbidities, hospital volume, and hospital characteristics, uninsured patients had a reduced likelihood of receiving a craniotomy (odds ratio [OR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71–0.82) and spinal fusion (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.64–0.71) relative to insured patients. This statistically significant trend persisted when uninsured and insured patients were matched on the basis of mortality propensity score. Uninsured patients demonstrated an elevated risk-adjusted mortality rate relative to insured patients in cases of extraaxial intracranial hematoma. Among patients with spinal injury, mortality rates were similar between patients with and without insurance.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, uninsured patients were consistently less likely to receive a craniotomy or spinal fusion for traumatic intracranial extraaxial hemorrhage and spinal vertebral fracture, respectively. This difference persisted after accounting for overall injury severity and patient access to high- or low-volume treatment centers, and potentially reflects a resource allocation bias against uninsured patients within the hospital setting. This information adds to the growing literature detailing the benefits of health reform initiatives seeking to expand access for the uninsured.

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David D. Gonda, Alexander A. Khalessi, Brandon A. McCutcheon, Logan P. Marcus, Abraham Noorbakhsh, Clark C. Chen, David C. Chang and Bob S. Carter

Object

Using a database that enabled longitudinal follow-up, the authors assessed the long-term outcomes of unruptured cerebral aneurysms repaired by clipping or coiling.

Methods

An observational analysis of the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) database, which follows patients longitudinally in time and through multiple hospitalizations, was performed for all patients initially treated for an unruptured cerebral aneurysm in the period from 1998 to 2005 and with follow-up data through 2009.

Results

Nine hundred forty-four cases (36.5%) were treated with endovascular coiling, 1565 cases (60.5%) were surgically clipped, and 76 cases were treated with both coiling and clipping. There was no significant difference in any demographic variable between the two treatment groups except for age (median: 55 years for the clipped group, 58 years for the coiled group, p < 0.001). Perioperative (30-day) mortality was 1.1% in patients with coiled aneurysms compared with 2.3% in those with clipped aneurysms (p = 0.048). The median follow-up was 7 years (range 4–12 years). At the last follow-up, 153 patients (16.2%) in the coiled group had died compared with 244 (15.6%) in the clipped group (p = 0.693). The adjusted hazard ratio for death at the long-term follow-up was 1.14 (95% CI 0.9–1.4, p = 0.282) for patients with endovascularly treated aneurysms. The incidence of intracranial hemorrhage was similar in the two treatment groups (5.9% clipped vs 4.8% coiled, p = 0.276). One hundred ninety-three patients (20.4%) with coiled aneurysms underwent additional hospitalizations for aneurysm repair procedures compared with only 136 patients (8.7%) with clipped aneurysms (p < 0.001). Cumulative hospital costs per patient for admissions involving aneurysm repair procedures were greater in the clipped group (median cost $98,260 vs $81,620, p < 0.001) through the follow-up.

Conclusions

For unruptured cerebral aneurysms, an observed perioperative survival advantage for endovascular coiling relative to that for surgical clipping was lost on long-term follow-up, according to data from an administrative database of patients who were not randomly allocated to treatment type. A cost advantage of endovascular treatment was maintained even though endovascularly treated patients were more likely to undergo subsequent hospitalizations for additional aneurysm repair procedures. Rates of aneurysm rupture following treatment were similar in the two groups.

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Logan P. Marcus, Brandon A. McCutcheon, Abraham Noorbakhsh, Ralitza P. Parina, David D. Gonda, Clark Chen, David C. Chang and Bob S. Carter

Object

Hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge is a major contributor to the high cost of health care in the US and is also a major indicator of patient care quality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, causes, and predictors of 30-day readmission following craniotomy for malignant supratentorial tumor resection.

Methods

The longitudinal California Office of Statewide Health Planning & Development inpatient-discharge administrative database is a data set that consists of 100% of all inpatient hospitalizations within the state of California and allows each patient to be followed throughout multiple inpatient hospital stays, across multiple institutions, and over multiple years (from 1995 to 2010). This database was used to identify patients who underwent a craniotomy for resection of primary malignant brain tumors. Causes for unplanned 30-day readmission were identified by principle ICD-9 diagnosis code and multivariate analysis was used to determine the independent effect of various patient factors on 30-day readmissions.

Results

A total of 18,506 patients received a craniotomy for the treatment of primary malignant brain tumors within the state of California between 1995 and 2010. Four hundred ten patients (2.2%) died during the index surgical admission, 13,586 patients (73.4%) were discharged home, and 4510 patients (24.4%) were transferred to another facility. Among patients discharged home, 1790 patients (13.2%) were readmitted at least once within 30 days of discharge, with 27% of readmissions occurring at a different hospital than the initial surgical institution. The most common reasons for readmission were new onset seizure and convulsive disorder (20.9%), surgical infection of the CNS (14.5%), and new onset of a motor deficit (12.8%). Medi-Cal beneficiaries were at increased odds for readmission relative to privately insured patients (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.20–1.93). Patients with a history of prior myocardial infarction were at an increased risk of readmission (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.06–2.54) as were patients who developed hydrocephalus (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.20–2.07) or venous complications during index surgical admission (OR 3.88, 95% CI 1.84–8.18).

Conclusions

Using administrative data, this study demonstrates a baseline glioma surgery 30-day readmission rate of 13.2% in California for patients who are initially discharged home. This paper highlights the medical histories, perioperative complications, and patient demographic groups that are at an increased risk for readmission within 30 days of home discharge. An analysis of conditions present on readmission that were not present at the index surgical admission, such as infection and seizures, suggests that some readmissions may be preventable. Discharge planning strategies aimed at reducing readmission rates in neurosurgical practice should focus on patient groups at high risk for readmission and comprehensive discharge planning protocols should be implemented to specifically target the mitigation of potentially preventable conditions that are highly associated with readmission.

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Robert C. Rennert, Reid Hoshide, Michael G. Brandel, Jeffrey A. Steinberg, Joel R. Martin, Hal S. Meltzer, David D. Gonda, Takanori Fukushima, Alexander A. Khalessi and Michael L. Levy

OBJECTIVE

Lesions of the foramen magnum, inferolateral-to-midclival areas, and ventral pons and medulla are often treated using a far-lateral or extreme-lateral infrajugular transcondylar–transtubercular exposure (ELITE) approach. The development and surgical relevance of critical posterior skull base bony structures encountered during these approaches, including the occipital condyle (OC), hypoglossal canal (HGC), and jugular tubercle (JT), are nonetheless poorly defined in the pediatric population.

METHODS

Measurements from high-resolution CT scans were made of the relevant posterior skull base anatomy (HGC depth from posterior edge of the OC, OC and JT dimensions) from 60 patients (evenly distributed among ages 0–3, 4–7, 8–11, 12–15, 16–18, and > 18 years), and compared between laterality, sex, and age groups by using t-tests and linear regression.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences in posterior skull base parameters by laterality, and HGC depth and JT size did not differ by sex. The OC area was significantly larger in males versus females (174.3 vs 152.2 mm2; p = 0.01). From ages 0–3 years to adult, the mean HGC depth increased 27% (from 9.0 to 11.4 mm) and the OC area increased 52% (from 121.4 to 184.0 mm2). The majority of growth for these parameters occurred between the 0–3 year and 4–7 year age groups. Conversely, JT volume increased nearly 3-fold (281%) from 97.4 to 370.9 mm3 from ages 0–3 years to adult, with two periods of substantial growth seen between the 0–3 to 4–7 year and the 12–15 to 16–18 year age groups. Overall, JT growth during pediatric development was significantly greater than increases in HGC depth and OC area (p < 0.05). JT volume remained < 65% of adult size up to age 16.

CONCLUSIONS

When considering a far-lateral or ELITE approach in pediatric patients, standard OC drilling is likely to be needed due to the relative stability of OC and HGC anatomy during development. The JT significantly increases in size with development, yet is only likely to need to be drilled in older children (> 16 years) and adults.