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Hongzhou Duan, Dapeng Mo, Yang Zhang, Jiayong Zhang, and Liang Li

OBJECTIVE

Symptomatic steno-occlusion of the proximal vertebral artery (VA) or subclavian artery (ScA) heralds a poor prognosis and high risk of stroke recurrence despite medical therapy, including antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. In some cases, the V2 segment of the cervical VA is patent and perfused via collateral vessels. The authors describe 7 patients who were successfully treated by external carotid artery (ECA)–saphenous vein (SV)–VA bypass.

METHODS

Seven cases involving symptomatic patients were retrospectively studied: 3 cases of V1 segment occlusion, 2 cases of severe in-stent restenosis in the V1 segment, and 2 cases of occlusion of the proximal ScA. All patients underwent ECA-SV-VA bypass. The ECA was isolated and retracted, and the anterior wall of the transverse foramen was unroofed. The VA was exposed, and then the 2 ends of the SV were anastomosed to the VA and ECA in an end-to-side fashion.

RESULTS

Surgical procedures were all performed as planned, with no intraoperative complications. There were 2 postoperative complications (severe laryngeal edema in one case and shoulder weakness in another), but both patients recovered fully and measures were taken to minimize laryngeal edema and its effects in subsequent cases. All patients experienced improvement of their symptoms. No new neurological deficits were reported. Postoperative angiography demonstrated that the anastomoses were all patent, and analysis of follow-up data (range of follow-up 12–78 months) revealed no further ischemic events in the vertebrobasilar territory.

CONCLUSIONS

The ECA-SV-VA bypass is a useful treatment for patients who suffer medically refractory ischemic events in the vertebrobasilar territory when the proximal part of the VA or ScA is severely stenosed or occluded but the V2 segment of the cervical VA is patent.

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Ying Yu, Long Yan, Yake Lou, Rongrong Cui, Kaijiang Kang, Lingxian Jiang, Dapeng Mo, Feng Gao, Yongjun Wang, Xin Lou, Zhongrong Miao, and Ning Ma

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to identify predictors of intracranial in-stent restenosis (ISR) after stent placement in symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS).

METHODS

The authors retrospectively collected data from consecutive patients who suffered from symptomatic ICAS and underwent successful stent placement in Beijing Tiantan hospital. Eligible patients were classified into “ISR,” “indeterminate ISR,” or “no-ISR” groups by follow-up digital subtraction angiography or CT angiography. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to explore the predictors of intracranial ISR after adjustments for age and sex. In addition, ISR and no-ISR patients were divided into two groups based on the strongest predictor, and the incidence of ISR, recurrent stroke, and symptomatic ISR was compared between the two groups.

RESULTS

A total of 511 eligible patients were included in the study: 80 ISR, 232 indeterminate ISR, and 199 no-ISR patients. Elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; odds ratio [OR] 4.747, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.253–10.01, p < 0.001), Mori type B and C (Mori type B vs Mori type A, OR 3.119, 95% CI 1.093–8.896, p = 0.033; Mori type C vs Mori type A, OR 4.780, 95% CI 1.244–18.37, p = 0.023), coronary artery disease (CAD; OR 2.721, 95% CI 1.192–6.212, p = 0.017), neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR; OR 1.474 95% CI 1.064–2.042, p = 0.020), residual stenosis (OR 1.050, 95% CI 1.022–1.080, p = 0.001) and concurrent intracranial tandem stenosis (OR 2.276, 95% CI 1.039–4.986, p = 0.040) synergistically contributed to the occurrence of intracranial ISR. Elevated hs-CRP (hs-CRP ≥ 3 mg/L) was the strongest predictor for ISR, and the incidence of ISR in the elevated hs-CRP group and normal hs-CRP group (hs-CRP < 3 mg/L) was 57.14% versus 21.52%, respectively, with recurrent stroke 44.64% versus 16.59%, and symptomatic ISR 41.07% versus 8.52%.

CONCLUSIONS

Elevated hs-CRP level, NLR, residual stenosis, Mori type B and C, CAD, and concurrent intracranial tandem stenosis are the main predictors of intracranial ISR, and elevated hs-CRP is crucially associated with recurrent stroke in patients with symptomatic ICAS after intracranial stent implantation.