Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Daniel S. Higginson x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Chunzi Jenny Jin, John Berry-Candelario, Anne S. Reiner, Ilya Laufer, Daniel S. Higginson, Adam M. Schmitt, Eric Lis, Ori Barzilai, Patrick Boland, Yoshiya Yamada and Mark H. Bilsky

OBJECTIVE

The current treatment of chordomas is associated with significant morbidity, high rates of local recurrence, and the potential for metastases. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as a primary treatment could reduce the need for en bloc resection to achieve wide or marginal margins. Spinal SRS outcomes support the exploration of SRS’s role in the durable control of these conventionally radioresistant tumors. The goal of the study was to evaluate outcomes of patients with primary chordomas treated with spinal SRS alone or in combination with surgery.

METHODS

Clinical records were reviewed for outcomes of patients with primary chordomas of the mobile spine and sacrum who underwent single-fraction SRS between 2006 and 2017. Radiographic local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), overall survival (OS), symptom response, and toxicity were assessed in relation to the extent of surgery.

RESULTS

In total, 35 patients with de novo chordomas of the mobile spine (n = 17) and sacrum (n = 18) received SRS and had a median post-SRS follow-up duration of 38.8 months (range 2.0–122.9 months). The median planning target volume dose was a 24-Gy single fraction (range 18–24 Gy). Overall, 12 patients (34%) underwent definitive SRS and 23 patients (66%) underwent surgery and either neoadjuvant or postoperative adjuvant SRS. Definitive SRS was selectively used to treat both sacral (n = 7) and mobile spine (n = 5) chordomas. Surgical strategies for the mobile spine were either intralesional, gross-total resection (n = 5) or separation surgery (n = 7) and for the sacrum en bloc sacrectomy (n = 11). The 3- and 5-year LRFS rates were 86.2% and 80.5%, respectively. Among 32 patients (91%) receiving 24-Gy radiation doses, the 3- and 5-year LRFS rates were 96.3% and 89.9%, respectively. The 3- and 5-year OS rates were 90.0% and 84.3%, respectively. The symptom response rate to treatment was 88% for pain and radiculopathy. The extent or type of surgery was not associated with LRFS, OS, or symptom response rates (p > 0.05), but en bloc resection was associated with higher surgical toxicity, as measured using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 5.0) classification tool, than epidural decompression and curettage/intralesional resection (p = 0.03). The long-term rate of toxicity ≥ grade 2 was 31%, including 20% grade 3 tissue necrosis, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, myelopathy, fracture, and secondary malignancy.

CONCLUSIONS

High-dose spinal SRS offers the chance for durable radiological control and effective symptom relief with acceptable toxicity in patients with primary chordomas as either a definitive or adjuvant therapy.

Free access

Dennis T. Lockney, Timothy Shub, Benjamin Hopkins, Natalie A. Lockney, Nelson Moussazadeh, Eric Lis, Yoshiya Yamada, Adam M. Schmitt, Daniel S. Higginson, Ilya Laufer and Mark Bilsky

OBJECTIVE

Chordoma is a rare malignant tumor for which en bloc resection with wide margins is advocated as primary treatment. Unfortunately, due to anatomical constraints, en bloc resection to achieve wide or marginal margins is not feasible for many patients as the resulting morbidity would be prohibitive. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intralesional curettage and separation surgery followed by spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with chordomas in the mobile spine.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective chart review of all patients with chordoma in the mobile spine treated from 2004 to 2016. Patients were identified from a prospectively collected database. Initially 22 patients were identified with mobile spine chordomas. With inclusion criteria of cytoreductive separation surgery followed closely by SBRT and a minimum of 6 months of follow-up imaging, 12 patients were included. Clinical and pathological characteristics of each patient were collected and data were analyzed. Patients were divided into two cohorts—those undergoing intralesional resection followed by SBRT as initial chordoma treatment at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (Cohort 1) and those undergoing salvage treatment following recurrence (Cohort 2). Treatment toxicities were classified according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Overall survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis.

RESULTS

The 12 patients had a median post-SBRT follow-up time of 26 months. Cohort 1 had 5 patients with median post-SBRT follow-up time of 65.9 months and local control rate of 80% at last follow-up. Only one patient had disease progression, at 48.2 months following surgery and SBRT. Cohort 2 had 7 patients who had been treated at other institutions prior to undergoing both surgery and SBRT (salvage therapy) at MSKCC. The local control rate was 57.1% and the median follow-up duration was 10.7 months. One patient required repeat irradiation. Major surgery- and radiation-related complications occurred in 18% and 27% of patients, respectively. Epidural spinal cord compression scores were collected for each patient pre- and postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS

The combination of surgery and SBRT provides excellent local control following intralesional curettage and separation surgery for chordomas in the mobile spine. Patients who underwent intralesional curettage and spinal SBRT as initial treatment had better disease control than those undergoing salvage therapy. High-dose radiotherapy may offer several biological benefits for tumor control.

Free access

Yoshiya Yamada, Evangelia Katsoulakis, Ilya Laufer, Michael Lovelock, Ori Barzilai, Lily A. McLaughlin, Zhigang Zhang, Adam M. Schmitt, Daniel S. Higginson, Eric Lis, Michael J. Zelefsky, James Mechalakos and Mark H. Bilsky

OBJECTIVE

An analysis of factors contributing to durable radiographic control of spinal metastases was undertaken, drawing from a large single-institution database in an attempt to elucidate indications and dose requirements for successful treatment.

METHODS

All patients treated at a single institution with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of the spine as first-line therapy were assessed for local progression of the treated site, defined as radiographic enlargement of the treated tumor and/or biopsy-proven evidence of active tumor cells. All patients were followed with CT, PET, or MR imaging every 3–6 months until death. Treatment decisions were made by a multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons, and neuroradiologists. Target volumes were defined according to the international consensus guidelines and were reviewed in a multidisciplinary conference. Image-guided techniques and intensity modulation were used for every case. The tumor's histological type, gross tumor volume (GTV), dose that covers 95% of the GTV (GTV D95), percentage of GTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose (GTV V95), planning target volume (PTV), dose that covers 95% of the PTV (PTV D95), and percentage of PTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95) were analyzed for significance in relation to local control, based on time to local progression.

RESULTS

A total of 811 lesions were treated in 657 patients between 2003 and 2015 at a single institution. The mean follow-up and overall survival for the entire cohort was 26.9 months (range 2–141 months). A total of 28 lesions progressed and the mean time to failure was 26 months (range 9.7–57 months). The median prescribed dose was 2400 cGy (range 1600–2600 cGy). Both GTV D95 and PTV D95 were highly significantly associated with local failure in univariate analysis, but GTV and PTV and histological type did not reach statistical significance. The median GTV D95 for the cohort equal to or above the GTV D95 1830 cGy cut point (high dose) was 2356 cGy, and it was 1709 cGy for the cohort of patients who received less than 1830 cGy (low dose). In terms of PTV D95, the median dose for those equal to or above the cut point of 1740 cGy (high dose) was 2233 cGy, versus 1644 cGy for those lesions below the PTV D95 cut point of 1740 cGy (low dose).

CONCLUSIONS

High-dose single-session SRS provides durable long-term control, regardless of the histological findings or tumor size. In this analysis, the only significant factors predictive of local control were related to the actual dose of radiation given. Although the target volumes were well treated with the intended dose, those lesions irradiated to higher doses (median GTV D95 2356 cGy, minimum 1830 cGy) had a significantly higher probability of durable local control than those treated with lower doses (median PTV D95 2232 cGy, minimum of 1740 cGy) (p < 0.001). Patients in the high-dose cohort had a 2% cumulative rate of local failure. Histological findings were not associated with local failure, suggesting that radioresistant histological types benefit in particular from radiosurgery. For patients with a favorable prognosis, a higher dose of SRS is important for long-term outcomes.

Full access

Dennis T. Lockney, Angela Y. Jia, Eric Lis, Natalie A. Lockney, Chengbao Liu, Benjamin Hopkins, Daniel S. Higginson, Yoshiya Yamada, Ilya Laufer, Mark Bilsky and Adam M. Schmitt

OBJECTIVE

Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an attractive method to deliver high doses of radiation to oligometastatic spinal tumors with radioresistant histology. Because SBRT is a palliative therapy, attention to potential radiation toxicities is paramount when counseling patients. The objective of this study was to report radiation-induced myositis after SBRT, a previously undescribed complication.

METHODS

A total of 667 patients received 891 spine SBRT treatments (either 24 Gy in 1 fraction or 27 Gy in 3 fractions) from 2011 to 2016 and underwent retrospective review. Eleven patients were identified as having radiographic evidence of myositis following SBRT. Clinical and pathologic results were collected, including receipt of anti–vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy, radiation dose, equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2), biologically effective dose (BED), and volume of muscle treated. Treatment toxicities were classified according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE; version 4.03). Univariate statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationships between radiation fractionation schedule and myositis and between anti-VEGF therapy and myositis.

RESULTS

The cumulative incidence of myositis was 1.9% at 1 year. The median of the mean dose administered to muscle with myositis was 17.5 Gy. The median EQD2 was 55.1 Gy, and the median BED was 82.7 Gy. The median time to the development of clinical symptoms was 1.4 months, while the median time to imaging evidence was 4.7 months. Two patients (18.2%) had CTCAE grade 3 complications. Single-fraction spine SBRT (HR 4.5, 95% CI 1.2–16.9; p = 0.027) was associated with increased risk of developing myositis whereas receipt of anti-VEGF therapy was not (HR 2.2, 95% CI 0.6–7.1; p = 0.2).

CONCLUSIONS

Radiation myositis following spinal radiosurgery is a rare but important complication. Single-fraction treatment schedules may be associated with increased risk of myositis but should be validated in a larger series.