Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 76 items for

  • Author or Editor: Daniel Resnick x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Daniel K. Resnick

Object

Exposure of the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal regions through a cervical incision without sternotomy has been described in cases of anterior decompression and methylmethacrylate vertebral body reconstruction. The use of anterior instrumentation and structural bone grafts in this procedure has not been well described.

Methods

Twenty-one patients underwent anterior cervicothoracic decompression, fusion, and fixation via a low cervical approach. Eight of these patients underwent lower cervical or upper thoracic corpectomy (C7–T4) through the cervical incision. The decompressive procedure was followed by placement of an allograft bone strut and an anterior locking plate system.

No patient developed new neurological deficit related to the spinal cord or exiting nerve roots. Three of four patients with preoperative neurological deficits improved dramatically. Two patients developed recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, of which one was permanent. There was one case of instrumentation-related failure, and two patients developed a superficial wound infection related to a posterior incision made as part of a 360° fusion. Patients were followed for a mean of 18.5 months (range 2–30 months). Two patients died (of metastatic cancer, and a motor vehicle accident, respectively) during the follow-up period.

Conclusions

Anterior decompression, fusion, and fixation is feasible via a cervical incision. This procedural approach spares the patient the morbidity associated with sternotomy or the lateral extracavitary approach. A thorough preoperative assessment of mediastinal anatomy is essential for the safe execution of these procedures.

Restricted access

Daniel K. Resnick

Object. Economic, demographic, and political pressures have mandated that medical schools increase the number of primary care physicians. The goal of this study was to determine the nature of the average medical student's exposure to neurosurgical issues.

Methods. Surveys were sent to every neurosurgical program director in the United States and to the dean of every medical school in North America, querying the extent of neurosurgical involvement in medical student education. Specifically, the respondents were asked how medical students were educated about the management of low-back pain and radiculopathy, carotid artery disease, head and spine trauma, and headache.

Survey results were obtained from 65 (67%) of 97 neurosurgery program directors and from 57 (40%) of 143 medical school deans. Only one program in North America reported having a required neurosurgical rotation for all medical students, and just over 50% (29 of 57 deans and 34 of 65 program directors) reported that neurosurgery was an option in a required neuroscience or surgical subspecialty course. Neurosurgeons were not listed among the top three sources for medical student education in the topics of low-back pain and radiculopathy or carotid artery disease. Neurosurgeons were the most frequently cited source of education regarding head and spinal injuries, despite the fact that the majority of medical schools do not have any required medical student exposure to neurosurgery.

Conclusions. With rare exceptions, neurosurgeons are not significantly involved in the education of medical students concerning the management of common neurosurgical issues. As a result, most emerging primary care physicians are taught about these issues by other specialists or not at all. The implications of this situation are discussed.

Restricted access

Daniel K. Resnick and Peter J. Jannetta

✓ A 37-year-old woman underwent microvascular decompression of the superior vestibular nerve for disabling positional vertigo. Immediately following the operation, she noted severe and spontaneous gagging and dysphagia. Multiple magnetic resonance images were obtained but failed to demonstrate a brainstem lesion and attempts at medical management failed. Two years later she underwent exploration of the posterior fossa. At the second operation, the vertebral artery as well as the posterior inferior cerebellar artery were noted to be compressing the vagus nerve. The vessels were mobilized and held away from the nerve with Teflon felt. The patient's symptoms resolved immediately after the second operation and she has remained symptom free. The authors hypothesize that at least one artery was shifted at the time of her first operation, or immediately thereafter, which resulted in vascular compression of the vagus nerve. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a hyperactive gagging response treated with microvascular decompression. The case also illustrates the occurrence of a possibly iatrogenic neurovascular compression syndrome.

Restricted access
Restricted access

Daniel K. Resnick, Mark R. McLaughlin and A. Leland Albright

✓ Endodermal sinus tumor is an uncommon malignant germ-cell neoplasm. These tumors usually present in childhood or young adulthood as testicular or ovarian masses; however, mediastinal and intracranial tumors have been described. The authors report the occurrence of a primary paraspinal endodermal sinus tumor in a 21-month-old boy who presented with thoracic spinal cord compression. A review of the literature failed to reveal a similar case. The clinical presentation, radiographic characteristics, operative findings, and patient outcome are discussed.

Restricted access

Daniel K. Resnick and Lincoln F. Ramirez

Object. Because of political and economic pressures, primary care physicians are now charged with greater responsibility for the care of patients with disease processes definitively managed by neurosurgeons. The goal of this study was to establish the feasibility and efficacy of a neurosurgical curriculum designed to teach future primary care physicians about these diseases.

Methods. A compact, seven-lecture curriculum was developed to teach 3rd-year medical students about degenerative spine disease, stroke, tumor- and hydrocephalus-related raised intracranial pressure, head and spine injury, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. This curriculum was given as part of a 6-week pilot course that included neurology, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, and rehabilitation medicine components. This course was administered to two groups of 18 medical students, and an examination was administered at the end of the pilot course. The same examination was administered to an additional 19 students immediately after their completion of the neurology course currently required.

Students enrolled in the pilot neuroscience course performed significantly better (p < 0.001) on the examination than those who had completed the standard neurology course. Striking improvements were noted in the recognition and management of head injury, hydrocephalus, and radiculopathy.

Conclusions. Inclusion of a short neurosurgery-related curriculum in a combined neuroscience course significantly improved student performance on an examination focusing on the recognition and management of common neurosurgical disorders. Because primary care physicians are responsible for the initial recognition and management of these disorders, the knowledge gained may lead to improved patient care.

Full access

Daniel K. Resnick, David G. Malone and Timothy C. Ryken

Object

Discography has been used as a diagnostic test in the evaluation of patients with recalcitrant low-back pain. Recently, its usefulness has been questioned because of the occurrence of false-positive results as well as the influence of psychological factors on test results. The purpose of this review is to establish the literature support for and against the use of discography.

A search of the English-language literature published between 1966 and 2001 was performed. Papers were selected based on inclusion criteria described in the text, and the quality of information was graded using previously described methods.

Conclusions

The authors propose a set of practice parameters based on the literature. Although the data were not judged adequate for the determination of a treatment standard, parameters for the use of discography are provided at a guideline and option level.

Full access

Basheal M. Agrawal, Nathaniel P. Brooks and Daniel K. Resnick

Object

Given the pragmatic difficulties in developing randomized controlled trials in patients with disorders of the spine, the Wisconsin Spine Outcome Group has adopted the use of a prospective registry design to perform comparative effectiveness research on treatments for degenerative lumbar disorders. The goal of the Wisconsin Spine Outcome Study–Pilot (WISPOS-P) was to establish a Web-based, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant registry and to implement a patient registration paradigm that demonstrates at least 80% compliance in collecting pre- and posttreatment data in patients with lumbar disorders, regardless of the treatment they receive. The primary outcome measures were the percentage of patients with lumbar spine disorders who completed a Web-based survey preappointment, and at 1 and 3 months postappointment; the percentage of patients receiving a physician-assigned diagnosis in the registry; and the success of electronic data transition from the Web-based interface to a locally controlled registry.

Methods

The WISPOS-P uses a prospective, diagnosis-based registry design. A universally accessible and secure Internet-based data management platform was created that accrues self-entered patient data on validated disability indices, including the visual analog pain scale, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire. Data were obtained on patients, preappointment and at 1 and 3 months postappointment, regardless of the treatment rendered. A physician-entered diagnosis was assigned to each patient for data stratification.

Results

One hundred patients were invited into the WISPOS-P; 90 patients participated, and 10 withdrew for various reasons. Eighty-eight of 90 patients were assigned a diagnosis by the evaluating physician. Preliminary and qualitative assessment of the data shows that the major difference between patients who withdrew from the study and those who participated was the number of days between study invitation and clinic appointment (median 11 vs 20.5 days, respectively). In evaluating patients by mode of survey completion, the 2 largest groups were those who completed their intake forms electronically before their clinic appointment and those who used the paper format. The median age of patients electronically completing this survey was 14.34 years younger than those using the paper format. A significantly higher proportion of patients who completed their forms electronically had listed an email address. The 3 major diagnoses were disc disease (32 patients), stenosis (24 patients), and nonsurgical pain of spinal origin (14 patients). Patients with stenosis were older than those in the other 2 groups. Patients with nonsurgical pain of spinal origin had lower ODI scores compared with the other 2 groups.

Conclusions

A diagnosis-based registry design is effective in collecting pretreatment data for patients with lumbar disorders. When stratified by diagnosis, comparative effectiveness analyses can be performed to identify optimum treatments for lumbar disorders given individual patient characteristics. The WISPOS-P has established a mechanism and proof of principle for the participation of patients in an outcomes registry.