Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for

  • Author or Editor: Da Li x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Tsai-Sheng Fu and Yun-Da Li

OBJECTIVE

For symptomatic loosened pedicle screws and instrumentation-associated vertebral fracture, extensive surgery to remove the pedicle screws and extend the instrumentation, along with the reinsertion of more pedicle screws, is usually the treatment of choice. After such a surgery, however, similar complications will still be encountered. In this study the authors propose minimally invasive percutaneous cement augmentation under fluoroscopic guidance as a salvage procedure that eliminates the inherent risks of conventional extensive surgery.

METHODS

The records for 10 consecutive patients who had undergone fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous cement augmentation for loosened pedicle screws and instrumentation-associated vertebral fractures were reviewed. The procedures, performed with the patients under local anesthesia, were basically similar to vertebroplasty except for the preexisting pedicle screws. The trocar was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance, along the path of the loosened pedicle screw, using the latero-pedicular approach. The visual analog scale (VAS) and radiographic images were used for clinical outcome assessment at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery.

RESULTS

The mean follow-up period was 14.3 months. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 1.2 days. There was neither cement leakage into the posterior neuroforamen nor neurological complication in this series. The mean VAS score improved from 5.9 preoperatively to 2.5 at the last follow-up (p = 0.02). Eight patients obtained satisfactory results and 2 needed revision open surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

The results demonstrate that minimally invasive fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty is technically feasible and can be performed safely and effectively for symptomatic loosened pedicle screws and instrumentation-associated vertebral fracture.

Free access

Da Zou, Weishi Li, Fei Xu and Guohong Du

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of Hounsfield unit (HU) values of the S1 body to diagnose osteoporosis in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases.

METHODS

The records of 316 patients of ages ≥ 50 years and requiring surgery for lumbar degenerative diseases were reviewed. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the S1 body and L1 was measured in HU with preoperative lumbar CT. Circular regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on midaxial and midsagittal images of the S1 body. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and the criterion of L1 HU ≤ 110 HU were used to diagnose osteoporosis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to assess the use of HUs of the S1 body to diagnose osteoporosis.

RESULTS

The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of measuring HU of the S1 body was excellent with intraclass correlation coefficients over 0.8 (p < 0.001). The correlation between HUs of the S1 body and average T-score of L1–4 was significant with Pearson correlation coefficients ≥ 0.60 (p < 0.001). The AUCs for using HUs of the S1 body to diagnose osteoporosis were 0.86 and 0.88 for axial HU and sagittal HU, respectively (p < 0.001). The HU thresholds with balanced sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing osteoporosis were 202 HU for axial HU (sensitivity: 76%; specificity: 76%) and 185 HU for sagittal HU (sensitivity: 80%; specificity: 80%).

CONCLUSIONS

Both sagittal and axial HUs of the S1 body are useful tools for assessing BMD and diagnosing osteoporosis. Measuring HUs of the S1 body preoperatively from lumbar CT may help with surgical planning for patients with lumbar degenerative diseases.

Restricted access

Cheng-Bei Li, Lai-Rong Song, Da Li, Jian-Cong Weng, Li-Wei Zhang, Jun-Ting Zhang and Zhen Wu

OBJECTIVE

The overall survival and pertinent adverse factors for primary intracranial malignant melanoma (PIMM) have not been previously determined. This aim of this study was to determine the rates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) and identify the adverse factors for PIMM.

METHODS

This study included 15 cases from the authors’ own series and 100 cases with detailed clinical data that were obtained from the literature from 1914 to 2018 using the Ovid Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane, and EBSCO databases. Patient demographics, treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy [RT]), PFS, and OS were reviewed. Data from prior publications were processed and used according to PRISMA guidelines.

RESULTS

Diffuse lesions were identified in 24 (20.9%) patients, who had a younger age (p < 0.001). The mean follow-up time was 16.6 months, and 76 (66.1%) deaths occurred. The 6-month, 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS rates of the whole cohort were 62.8%, 49.9%, 28.9%, and 17.2%, respectively, with an estimated median survival time (EMST) of 12.0 months. The multivariate analysis revealed that gross-total resection (GTR) (HR 0.299, 95% CI 0.180–0.497, p < 0.001), radiotherapy (HR 0.577, 95% CI 0.359–0.929, p = 0.024), and chemotherapy (HR 0.420, 95% CI 0.240–0.735, p = 0.002) predicted a better OS. The EMST was 5.0 months in patients with diffuse-type PIMM and 13.0 months in patients with the solitary type. Patients receiving GTR with adjuvant RT and/or chemotherapy (GTR + [RT and/or chemo]) had significantly higher 1-year and 5-year OS rates (73.0% and 40.1%, respectively) and a longer EMST (53 months) than patients who underwent GTR alone (20.5 months) or RT and/or chemotherapy without GTR (13.0 months).

CONCLUSIONS

Optimal outcomes could be achieved by radical resection plus postoperative radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Patients with diffuse PIMM have a more severe clinical spectrum and poorer survival than patients with solitary PIMM. Immunotherapy and targeted therapy show promise as treatment options for PIMM based on results in patients with brain metastases from extracranial melanoma.

Free access

Da Li and Jun-Ting Zhang

Full access

Da Li, Shu-Yu Hao, Zhen Wu, Li-Wei Zhang and Jun-Ting Zhang

Medulla oblongata teratomas are rare. The authors report 2 new cases of teratomas that occurred exclusively in the medulla oblongata. The first case was in a 9-year-old boy who presented with a 6-month history of neck pain and repeated paroxysmal vomiting. Based on preoperative radiographic findings, the initial diagnosis was of an intraaxial medulla oblongata hemangioblastoma. Intraoperatively, the cystic component of the tumor was gray, gelatinous, and soft in consistency. The solid component was light pink, rubbery, and nodular in appearance, with an identifiable boundary. The lesion was completely removed. Histopathological investigation revealed a mature teratoma. Postoperatively, the patient was supported with ventilator assistance and received a tracheotomy, but died of intracranial infection. The second case was in a 10-year-old boy with intermittent headache for 1 month. Radiographs revealed an exophytic cystic and solid lesion with dorsal involvement of the medulla oblongata. The lesion was predominantly solid, pinkish gray, tenacious, and moderately vascularized, with clearly delineated surgical dissection planes. The histopathological examination confirmed a diagnosis of immature teratoma. Total resection was achieved, followed by postoperative chemotherapy. He was alive without recurrence of the lesion or symptoms at 59 months after surgery.

Resection of medulla oblongata teratoma is challenging, with inherent surgical risks that are contingent on the tumor growth pattern. Teratomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of brainstem lesions. Chemotherapy has been suggested for immature teratomas. Long-term follow-up and larger studies of teratomas in unusual locations are required to improve practitioners' understanding of this disease's treatment and outcomes.

Restricted access

Da Li, Yu-Ming Jiao, Liang Wang, Fu-Xin Lin, Jun Wu, Xian-Zeng Tong, Shuo Wang and Yong Cao

OBJECTIVE

Surgical management of brainstem lesions is challenging due to the highly compact, eloquent anatomy of the brainstem. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) in brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs).

METHODS

A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was performed by using stratified blocked randomization. The primary eligibility criterion of the study was being a surgical candidate for brainstem CMs (with informed consent). The study enrolled 23 patients who underwent preoperative DTI/DTT and 24 patients who did not (the control group). The pre- and postoperative muscle strength of both limbs and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores were evaluated. Muscle strength of any limb at 12 months after surgery at the clinic visit was the primary outcome; worsened muscle strength was considered to be a poor outcome. Outcome assessors were blinded to patient management. This study reports the preliminary results of the interim analysis.

RESULTS

The cohort included 47 patients (22 women) with a mean age of 35.7 years. The clinical baselines between these 2 groups were not significantly different. In the DTI/DTT group, the corticospinal tract was affected in 17 patients (73.9%): it was displaced, deformed/partially interrupted, or completely interrupted in 6, 7, and 4 patients, respectively. The surgical approach and brainstem entry point were adjusted in 3 patients (13.0%) based on DTI/DTT data. The surgical morbidity of the DTI/DTT group (7/23, 30.4%) was significantly lower than that of the control group (19/24, 79.2%, p = 0.001). At 12 months, the mean mRS score (1.1, p = 0.034) and percentage of patients with worsened motor deficits (4.3%, p = 0.006) were significantly lower in the DTI/DTT group than in the control group (1.7% and 37.5%). Multivariate logistic regression identified the absence of preoperative DTI/DTT (OR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01–0.73, p = 0.028) and use of the 2-point method (OR 4.15, 95% CI 1.38–12.49, p = 0.011) as independent adverse factors for a worsened motor deficit. The multivariate model found a significant correlation between poor mRS score and both an increased preoperative mRS score (t = 3.559, p = 0.001) and absence of preoperative DTI/DTT (t = −2.747, p = 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS

DTI/DTT noninvasively allowed for visualization of the anatomical relationship between vital tracts and pathologies as well as facilitated the brainstem surgical approach and entry-point decision making. The technique was valuable for complex neurosurgical planning to reduce morbidity. Nonetheless, DTI/DTT data should be interpreted cautiously.

■ CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE Type of question: therapeutic; study design: randomized controlled trial; evidence: class I.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT01758211 (ClinicalTrials.gov)

Full access

Da Li, Shu-Yu Hao, Gui-Jun Jia, Zhen Wu, Li-Wei Zhang and Jun-Ting Zhang

Object

Cerebral cavernous malformations have been studied widely, but the natural history of brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs) is not well defined, and hemorrhages caused by brainstem CMs are devastating. The goal of this study was to quantify the hemorrhage risks and functional outcomes of patients with brainstem CMs.

Methods

This prospective, longitudinal, cohort study included patients with brainstem CMs diagnosed between 1985 and 2012. The clinical courses of all patients were recorded. Predictors of hemorrhage and the overall untreated outcomes were evaluated.

Results

A total of 331 patients (46.5% female) were included, with a mean follow-up duration of 6.5 years. The annual hemorrhage rates in patients initially presenting with hemorrhage with (n = 215) or without (n = 34) focal neurological deficits were 15.9% and 12.4%, respectively. However, the annual hemorrhage rate was 8.7% in patients initially presenting without hemorrhage (n = 82). The risk factors for hemorrhage were female sex (hazard ratio [HR] 1.445, p = 0.041), prior hemorrhage (HR 1.277, p = 0.029), and perilesional edema (HR 1.830, p = 0.002). Overall, neurological function at the most recent assessment was improved compared with neurological function at diagnosis. Additionally, 307 patients (92.7%) improved or stabilized, 268 (81.0%) lived independently, and 95 (28.7%) completely recovered. Predictors favoring complete recovery were no prospective hemorrhage (HR 1.958, p = 0.001), younger age (HR 1.268, p = 0.001), and small lesion size (HR 1.578, p = 0.004).

Conclusions

Patients' initial presentation predicts their prospective annual hemorrhage rate. This study suggests that several strong risk factors for hemorrhage and predictors of brainstem CM outcomes may enable clinicians to evaluate the potential hemorrhage risks of their patients and design personalized treatments.

Full access

Hui-Ren Tao, Tian-Li Yang, Michael S. Chang, Huan Li, Da-Wei Zhang, Hong-Bin Fan, Chao Shen and Zhuo-Jing Luo

Tethered cord is a common finding in congenital scoliosis. The most frequently advocated approach for this condition is to perform prophylactic detethering of the cord before scoliosis corrective surgery. The authors report on a 14-year-old patient with congenital thoracic kyphoscoliosis associated with a tethered cord, who developed progressive paraparesis and was successfully treated by posterior spine shortening osteotomy alone without prophylactic untethering. The patient had a 103° scoliotic curve together with a 93° kyphotic curve with an apical vertebra of T-7. Furthermore, he developed a significant progression of neurological deficits, including weakness of both legs and urinary and bowel incontinence. Preoperative MRI revealed that the spinal cord was entrapped by the apical vertebra and the low-placed conus medullaris was at approximately L-5. A posterior vertebral column resection of T-7 was performed for the purpose of simultaneously correcting the kyphoscoliosis and releasing tension on the tethered cord without a true detethering surgery. The patient's spinal cord function recovered completely from Frankel D to Frankel E by 6 months after the procedure. Evaluation at 31 months after surgery showed maintenance of good curve correction and normal neurological function.

Restricted access

Da Li, Shu-Yu Hao, Liang Wang, Gui-Lin Li, Jun-Mei Wang, Zhen Wu, Li-Wei Zhang, Jun-Ting Zhang and Wang Jia

OBJECTIVE

Medulloepithelioma (MEPL) is a rare, malignant primitive neuroectodermal tumor with dismal survival rates. The authors aimed to define independent risk factors for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) and to propose an optimal treatment protocol for MEPL.

METHODS

The authors reviewed the clinicoradiological data obtained in 12 patients with MEPL who underwent surgical treatment at their institution between January 2008 and June 2016. In addition, they reviewed 55 cases of MEPL published in the literature from January 1957 to July 2017. A pooled analysis of individual patient data of these 67 patients was performed to evaluate risk factors.

RESULTS

The authors’ cohort included 5 males and 7 females with a mean age of 15.7 years. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 10 (83.3%) patients. Radiotherapy (mean total dose 42.8 Gy) and chemotherapy were administered to 7 and 4 patients, respectively. After a median follow-up of 21.7 months, 6 (50%) patients suffered recurrence and subsequently died, with median PFS and OS times of 5.5 and 13.9 months, respectively. Among the 55 patients in the literature, 13 (23.6%) patients received GTR, and 25 (49.0%) and 15 (29.4%) received radiotherapy (median total dose 53.2 Gy) and chemotherapy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 10.0 months, the recurrence and mortality rates were 69.7% (23/33) and 70.8% (34/48), respectively, and the median PFS was 6.0 months. Of the pooled cohort, the actuarial 5-year PFS and OS were 36.3% and 29.2%, respectively, and the estimated median survival time for PFS and OS were 12.8 and 15.2 months, respectively. A multivariate Cox model verified non-GTR (HR 5.537, p < 0.001) and no radiotherapy (HR 3.553, p = 0.008) as independent adverse factors for PFS. The 5-year PFS in patients with or without GTR was 63.8% and 6.3%, respectively, and in patients with or without radiotherapy was 42.7% and 23.1%, respectively. A multivariate model demonstrated non-GTR (HR 9.089, p < 0.001), no radiotherapy (HR 3.126, p = 0.004), and no chemotherapy (HR 3.621, p = 0.004) as independent adverse factors for poor OS. The 5-year OS in patients with GTR, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy was 72.1%, 44.0%, and 58.0%, respectively. In contrast, in patients without GTR, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy, the 5-year OS was 5.8%, 14.3%, and 15.8%, respectively. Overall, in patients receiving GTR plus chemoradiotherapy, the actuarial 5-year PFS and OS were both 87.5%.

CONCLUSIONS

MEPL is a rare neoplastic entity with a poor prognosis. There are no distinguishing radiological features apart from cystic degeneration. Via the pooled analysis, the authors identified independent adjustable factors associated with PFS and OS, from which they advocate for GTR plus chemoradiotherapy with a sufficient dose if tolerable as an optimal treatment to improve outcomes. Future studies with large cohorts will be necessary to verify our findings.

Restricted access

Jian-Cong Weng, Lai-Rong Song, Da Li, Liang Wang, Zhen Wu, Jun-Mei Wang, Gui-Lin Li, Wang Jia, Li-Wei Zhang and Jun-Ting Zhang

OBJECTIVE

Primary intracranial myxomas (PICMs) are extremely rare neoplasms, and their management and prognostic factors remain ambiguous. The authors aimed to elaborate the radiological features, evaluate the risk factors for progression-free survival (PFS), and propose a treatment protocol based on pooled data from cases treated at their institute and those found in the literature.

METHODS

Clinical data from all cases of PICMs treated at the authors’ institute and those cases reported in the English-language literature between 1987 and December 2017 were reviewed. The authors searched the Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane databases using the keywords “myxoma” and “central nervous system,” “intracranial,” “cerebral,” “skull base,” “skull,” or “brain.” Previously published data were processed and used according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Risk factors in the pooled cohort were evaluated.

RESULTS

Cases from the authors’ institute included 21 males and 9 females, with a mean age of 35.7 ± 1.7 years. Gross-total resection (GTR) and non-GTR were achieved in 6 (20.0%) and 24 (80.0%) patients, respectively. After a mean follow-up of 86.7 ± 14.1 months, recurrence occurred in 6 (24%) patients, for a median PFS time of 85.2 months (range 36.0–136.0 months) and no deaths. In the literature between 1987 and 2017, 35 cases of PICM were identified in 14 males and 21 females with a mean age of 31.7 ± 3.2 years. GTR and non-GTR were achieved in 23 (65.7%) and 9 (25.7%) cases, respectively. After a mean follow-up of 25.8 ± 6.9 months (range 1.0–156.0 months), recurrence occurred in 4 (14.3%) patients, for a median PFS time of 11.0 months (range 3.0–36.0 months) and no deaths. Actuarial PFS rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were 93.0%, 80.6%, and 67.9%, respectively. A multivariate model demonstrated that GTR (HR 0.058, 95% CI 0.005–0.680, p = 0.023) was the only factor that favored PFS.

CONCLUSIONS

PICMs are rare neoplasms with a slightly higher occurrence in males. GTR was the only favorable factor for PFS. Based on statistical results, GTR alone, if tolerable, is advocated as the optimal treatment for PICM. Nevertheless, conservative excision may be preferred to avoid damage to vital structures. PICMs have a tendency to recur within a few years of the initial surgery if resection is incomplete; therefore, close postoperative follow-up is mandatory. Future studies with larger cohorts are necessary to verify the study findings.

Systematic review registration no.: CRD42018091517 (www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/)