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Gamma Knife surgery–induced meningioma

Report of two cases and review of the literature

Jason Sheehan, Chun PO Yen and Ladislau Steiner

✓Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is a minimally invasive neurosurgical technique. During the past 30 years, radiosurgery has been performed for a number of intracranial disorders with a generally low incidence of side effects. Although radiation-induced neoplasia following radiotherapy is well documented, there are few reports of this complication following radiosurgery.

The authors are engaged in an ongoing project in which they are studying the delayed adverse effects of radiosurgical changes in 2500 patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated within a 30-year period. The cases of 1333 patients treated by the senior author (L.S.) have been reviewed thus far. A subset of 288 patients in this group underwent neuroimaging and participated in clinical follow up for at least 10 years.

The authors report two cases of radiosurgically induced neoplasia. In both cases the patient was treated with GKS for an AVM. Longer than 10 years after GKS, each of the patients was found to have an incidental, uniformly enhancing, dura-based mass lesion near the site of the AVM. These lesions displayed the imaging characteristics of a meningioma. Because in both cases the lesion has displayed no evidence of a mass effect, they continue to be followed using serial neuroimaging. These are the fifth and sixth cases meeting the criteria for radiation-induced neoplasms defined by Cahan, et al., in 1998.

Although radiosurgery is generally considered quite safe, the incidence of radiation-induced neoplasms is not known. These cases and the few others detailed in the literature emphasize the need for long-term neurosurgical follow-up review in patients after radiosurgery.

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Claire Olson, Chun-Po Yen, David Schlesinger and Jason Sheehan

Object

Intracranial hemangiopericytoma is a rare CNS tumor that exhibits a high incidence of local recurrence and distant metastasis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in the management of intracranial hemangiopericytomas.

Methods

In a review of the University of Virginia radiosurgery database between 1989 and 2008, the authors found recurrent or residual hemangiopericytomas after resection in 21 patients in whom radiosurgery was performed to treat 28 discrete tumors. The median age of this population was 47 years (range 31–61 years) at the time of the initial GKS. Prior treatments included embolization (6), transcranial resection (39), transsphenoidal resection (2), and fractionated radiotherapy (8). The mean prescription and maximum radiosurgical doses to the tumors were 17.0 and 40.3 Gy, respectively. Repeat radiosurgery was used to treat 13 tumors. The median follow-up period was 68 months (range 2–138 months).

Results

At last follow-up, local tumor control was demonstrated in 47.6% of the patients (10 of 21 patients) with hemangiopericytomas. Of the 28 tumors treated, 8 decreased in size on follow-up imaging (28.6%), 5 remained unchanged (17.9%), and 15 ultimately progressed (53.6%). The progression-free survival rates were 90, 60.3, and 28.7% at 1, 3, and 5 years after initial GKS. The progression-free survival rate improved to 95, 71.5, and 71.5% at 1, 3, and 5 years after multiple GKS treatments. The 5-year survival rate after radiosurgery was 81%. Prior fractionated irradiation or radiosurgical prescription dose did not correlate with tumor control. In 4 (19%) of 21 patients extracranial metastases developed.

Conclusions

Radiosurgery is a reasonable treatment option for recurrent hemangiopericytomas. Long-term close clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary because of the high probability of local recurrence and distant metastases. Repeat radiosurgery may be used to treat new or recurrent hemangiopericytomas over a long follow-up course.

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Cheng-Chia Lee, Chun-Po Yen, Zhiyuan Xu, David Schlesinger and Jason Sheehan

Object

The use of radiosurgery has been well accepted for treating small to medium-size metastatic brain tumors (MBTs). However, its utility in treating large MBTs remains uncertain due to potentially unfavorable effects such as progressive perifocal brain edema and neurological deterioration. In this retrospective study the authors evaluated the local tumor control rate and analyzed possible factors affecting tumor and brain edema response.

Methods

The authors defined a large brain metastasis as one with a measurement of 3 cm or more in at least one of the 3 cardinal planes (coronal, axial, or sagittal). A consecutive series of 109 patients with 119 large intracranial metastatic lesions were treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) between October 2000 and December 2012; the median tumor volume was 16.8 cm3 (range 6.0–74.8 cm3). The pre-GKS Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score for these patients ranged from 70 to 100. The most common tumors of origin were non–small cell lung cancers (29.4% of cases in this series). Thirty-six patients (33.0%) had previously undergone a craniotomy (1–3 times) for tumor resection. Forty-three patients (39.4%) underwent whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) before GKS. Patients were treated with GKS and followed clinically and radiographically at 2- to 3-month intervals thereafter.

Results

The median duration of imaging follow-up after GKS for patients with large MBTs in this series was 6.3 months. In the first follow-up MRI studies (performed within 3 months after GKS), 77 lesions (64.7%) had regressed, 24 (20.2%) were stable, and 18 (15.1%) were found to have grown. Peritumoral brain edema as defined on T2-weighted MRI sequences had decreased in 79 lesions (66.4%), was stable in 21 (17.6%), but had progressed in 19 (16.0%). In the group of patients who survived longer than 6 months (76 patients with 77 MBTs), 88.3% of the MBTs (68 of 77 lesions) had regressed or remained stable at the most recent imaging follow-up, and 89.6% (69 of 77 lesions) showed regression of perifocal brain edema volume or stable condition. The median duration of survival after GKS was 8.3 months for patients with large MBTs. Patients with small cell lung cancer and no previous WBRT had a significantly higher tumor control rate as well as better brain edema relief. Patients with a single metastasis, better KPS scores, and no previous radiosurgery or WBRT were more likely to decrease corticosteroid use after GKS. On the other hand, higher pre-GKS KPS score was the only factor that showed a statistically significant association with longer survival.

Conclusions

Treating large MBTs using either microsurgery or radiosurgery is a challenge for neurosurgeons. In selected patients with large brain metastases, radiosurgery offered a reasonable local tumor control rate and favorable functional preservation. Exacerbation of underlying edema was rare in this case series. Far more commonly, edema and steroid use were lessened after radiosurgery. Radiosurgery appears to be a reasonable option for some patients with large MBTs.

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David J. Schlesinger, Faisal T. Sayer, Chun-Po Yen and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Treatment planning for Gamma Knife surgery has traditionally been a forward planning (FP)–only approach with results that depend significantly on the experience of the user. Leksell GammaPlan version 10.0, currently in beta testing, introduces a new inverse planning (IP) engine that may allow more reproducible results across dosimetrists and individual institutions. In this study the authors compared the FP and IP approaches to Gamma Knife surgery.

Methods

Forty-three patients with pituitary adenomas were evaluated after dose planning was performed using FP and IP treatment approaches. Treatment plans were compared for target coverage, target selectivity, Paddick gradient index, number of isocenters, optic pathways dose, and treatment time. Differences between the forward and inverse treatment plans were evaluated in a statistical fashion.

Results

The IP software generated a dose plan within approximately 10 minutes. The FP approach delivered the prescribed isodose to a larger treatment volume than the IP system (p < 0.001). The mean (± SD) FP and IP coverage indices were 0.85 ± 0.23 and 0.85 ± 0.13, respectively (no significant difference). The mean FP and IP gradient indices were 2.78 ± 0.20 and 3.08 ± 0.37, respectively (p < 0.001). The number of isocenters did not appreciably differ between approaches. The maximum doses directed to the optic apparatus for the FP and IP methods were 8.67 ± 1.97 Gy and 12.33 ± 5.86 Gy, respectively (p < 0.001).

Conclusions

The Leksell GammaPlan IP system was easy to operate and provided a reasonable, first approximation dose plan. Particularly in cases in which there are eloquent structures at risk, experience and user-based optimization will be required to achieve an acceptable Gamma Knife dose plan.

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Jason P. Sheehan, Chun-Po Yen, James Nguyen, Jessica A. Rainey, Kasandra Dassoulas and David J. Schlesinger

Object

Stereotactic radiosurgery has been shown to afford a reasonable chance of local tumor control. However, new brain metastasis can arise following successful local tumor control from radiosurgery. This study evaluates the timing, number, and risk factors for development of subsequent new brain metastasis in a group of patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery alone.

Methods

One hundred seventeen patients with histologically confirmed metastatic cancer underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) to treat all brain metastases demonstrable on MR imaging. Patients were followed clinically and radiologically at approximately 3-month intervals for a median of 14.4 months (range 0.37–51.8 months). Follow-up MR images were evaluated for evidence of new brain metastasis formation. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the timing, number, and risk factors for development of new brain metastases.

Results

The median time to development of a new brain metastasis was 8.8 months. Patients with 3 or more metastases at the time of initial radiosurgery or those with cancer histologies other than non–small cell lung carcinoma were found to be at increased risk for early formation of new brain metastasis (p < 0.05). The mean number of new metastases per patient was 1.6 (range 0–11). Those with a higher Karnofsky Performance Scale score at the time of initial GKS were significantly more likely to develop a greater number of brain metastases by the last follow-up evaluation.

Conclusions

The timing and number of new brain metastases developing in patients treated with GKS alone is not inconsequential. Those with 3 or more metastases at the time of radiosurgery and those with cancer histology other than non–small cell lung carcinoma were at greater risk of early formation of new brain metastasis. Frequent follow-up evaluations, such as at 3-month intervals, appears appropriate in this patient population, particularly in high-risk patients. When detected early, salvage treatments including repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat new brain metastasis.

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Dale Ding, Chun-Po Yen, Zhiyuan Xu, Robert M. Starke and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

The appropriate management of unruptured intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) remains controversial. In the present study, the authors evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes of radiosurgery for a large cohort of patients with unruptured AVMs.

Methods

From a prospective database of 1204 cases of AVMs involving patients treated with radiosurgery at their institution, the authors identified 444 patients without evidence of rupture prior to radiosurgery. The patients' mean age was 36.9 years, and 50% were male. The mean AVM nidus volume was 4.2 cm3, 13.5% of the AVMs were in a deep location, and 44.4% were at least Spetzler-Martin Grade III. The median radiosurgical prescription dose was 20 Gy. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to determine risk factors associated with obliteration, postradiosurgery hemorrhage, radiation-induced changes, and postradiosurgery cyst formation. The mean duration of radiological and clinical follow-up was 76 months and 86 months, respectively.

Results

The cumulative AVM obliteration rate was 62%, and the postradiosurgery annual hemorrhage rate was 1.6%. Radiation-induced changes were symptomatic in 13.7% and permanent in 2.0% of patients. The statistically significant independent positive predictors of obliteration were no preradiosurgery embolization (p < 0.001), increased prescription dose (p < 0.001), single draining vein (p < 0.001), radiological presence of radiation-induced changes (p = 0.004), and lower Spetzler-Martin grade (p = 0.016). Increased volume and higher Pittsburgh radiosurgery-based AVM score were predictors of postradiosurgery hemorrhage in the univariate analysis only. Clinical deterioration occurred in 30 patients (6.8%), more commonly in patients with postradiosurgery hemorrhage (p = 0.018).

Conclusions

Radiosurgery afforded a reasonable chance of obliteration of unruptured AVMs with relatively low rates of clinical and radiological complications.

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Chun-Po Yen, Joshua M. Beckman, Andrew C. Vivas, Konrad Bach and Juan S. Uribe

OBJECTIVE

The authors investigated whether the presence of intradiscal vacuum phenomenon (IVP) results in greater correction of disc height and restoration of segmental lordosis (SL).

METHODS

A retrospective chart review was performed on every patient at the University of South Florida's Department of Neurosurgery treated with lateral lumbar interbody fusion between 2011 and 2015. From these charts, preoperative plain radiographs and CT images were reviewed for the presence of IVP. Preoperative and postoperative posterior disc height (PDH), anterior disc height (ADH), and SL were measured at disc levels with IVP and compared with those at disc levels without IVP using the t-test. Linear regression was used to evaluate the factors that predict changes in PDH, ADH, and SL.

RESULTS

One hundred forty patients with 247 disc levels between L-1 and L-5 were treated with lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Among all disc levels treated, the mean PDH increased from 3.69 to 6.66 mm (p = 0.011), the mean ADH increased from 5.45 to 11.53 mm (p < 0.001), and the mean SL increased from 9.59° to 14.55° (p < 0.001). Significantly increased PDH was associated with the presence of IVP, addition of pedicle screws, and lack of cage subsidence; significantly increased ADH was associated with the presence of IVP, anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) release, addition of pedicle screws, and lack of subsidence; and significantly increased SL was associated with the presence of IVP and ALL release.

CONCLUSIONS

IVP in patients with degenerative spinal disease remains grossly underreported. The data from the present study suggest that the presence of IVP results in increased restoration of disc height and SL.

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Chun Po Yen, Jason Sheehan, Greg Patterson and Ladislau Steiner

Object

The authors review imaging and clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic brainstem tumors treated using Gamma Knife surgery (GKS).

Methods

Between March 1989 and March 2005, 53 patients (24 men and 29 women) with metastatic brainstem lesions underwent GKS. The metastatic deposits were located in the midbrain in eight patients, the pons in 42, and the medulla oblongata in three. Lung cancer was the most common primary malignancy, followed by breast cancer, melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma. The mean volume of the metastatic deposits at the time of treatment was 2.8 cm3 (range 0.05–21 cm3). The prescription doses varied from 9 to 25 Gy (mean 17.6 Gy).

Imaging follow-up studies were not completed in 16 patients, because of the short-term survival in 11 and patient refusal in five. Of the remaining 37 patients, who underwent an imaging follow-up evaluation at a mean of 9.8 months (range 1–25 months), the tumors disappeared in seven, shrank in 22, remained unchanged in three, and grew in five. All but one of 18 patients with asymptomatic brainstem deposits remained free of symptoms. In 35 patients with symptomatic brainstem deposits, neurological symptoms improved in 21, remained stable in 11, and worsened in three. At the time of this study, 10 patients were alive, and their survival ranged from 3 to 52 months after treatment. Thirty-four patients died of extracranial disease, three of the progressing metastatic brainstem lesion, and six of additional progressing intracranial deposits in other parts of the brain. The overall median survival period was 11 months after GKS. In terms of survival, the absence of active extracranial disease was the only favorable prognostic factor. Neither previous whole-brain radiation therapy nor a single brainstem metastasis was statistically related to the duration of survival.

Conclusions

Compared with allowing a metastatic brainstem lesion to take its natural course, GKS prolongs survival. The risks associated with such treatment are low. The severity of systemic diseases largely determines the prognosis of metastases to the brainstem.

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Douglas Kondziolka

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Editorial

Arteriovenous malformations

Douglas Kondziolka