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Dong Hyun Yoo, Chul-Ho Sohn, Young Dae Cho, Hyun-Seung Kang, Chul-Kee Park, Jin Wook Kim, and Jae Hyoung Kim

OBJECTIVE

Superselective pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (ss-pCASL) is an MRI technique in which individual vessels are labeled to trace their perfusion territories. In this study, the authors assessed its merit in defining feeding vessels and gauging preoperative embolization feasibility for patients with meningioma, using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference method.

METHODS

Thirty-one consecutive patients with meningiomas were prospectively recruited, each undergoing DSA (and embolization, if feasible) before resection. All ss-pCASL imaging studies were performed 1 day prior to DSA. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed ss-pCASL images, rating the contribution of each labeled vessel to tumor blood supply as none, minor, or major. Two neuroradiologists also gauged the feasibility of embolization in each patient, based on ss-pCASL images. Interobserver and intermodality agreement were determined using Cohen’s kappa statistic. The diagnostic performance of ss-pCASL was assessed in terms of discerning tumor blood supply and the potential for embolization.

RESULTS

Interobserver agreement in the rating of blood supply by ss-pCASL was very good (κ = 0.817, 95% CI 0.771–0.863), and intermodality agreement (consensus ss-pCASL readings vs DSA findings) was good (κ = 0.688, 95% CI 0.632–0.744). In delineating tumor blood supply, ss-pCASL showed high sensitivity (87.1%) and specificity (87.2%). The positive and negative predictive values for embolization feasibility were 85.2% and 100%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with meningiomas, feeding vessels are reliably predicted by ss-pCASL. This noninvasive approach, involving no iodinated contrast or radiation exposure, is particularly beneficial if there are no prospects of embolization.

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Min A. Yoon, Eunhee Kim, Bae-Ju Kwon, Jeong Eun Kim, Hyun-Seung Kang, Jae Hyo Park, Chul-Ho Sohn, Ji-Hoon Kim, and Dong Hoon Lee

Object

Reinforcement of aneurysms with additional wrapping is an alternative procedure if the aneurysm cannot be completely clipped. Wrapping with muslin (cotton gauze) rarely incites foreign body inflammatory reactions. In this study, the authors describe the clinical and radiological features of muslinomas or muslin-induced foreign body reactions that can develop after treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

Methods

Over a 3-year period, 5 patients with muslinomas underwent treatment at the authors' institution. All patients underwent aneursym clipping and wrapping, and were subsequently readmitted with acute or subacute neurological symptoms. Clinical and imaging features on diffusion weighted MR images and cerebral angiography images were retrospectively reviewed. The patients' clinical course and follow-up imaging studies were also evaluated.

Results

In all 5 cases, muslinomas were seen as rim-enhancing inflammatory masses around the clipped aneurysms with perilesional edema visible on MR images at the time of clinical deterioration. The MR images also demonstrated adhesive arachnoiditis with a sterile intracranial abscess in 3 patients, optic neuropathy in 2, parent artery narrowing in 2, and a resultant acute ischemic infarction in 1 patient. Follow-up imaging revealed resolution of both the perilesional edema and adhesive arachnoiditis but no significant changes in the muslinomas. All patients underwent conservative management and fully recovered, but during the follow-up period, 2 patients experienced clinical and radiological relapses.

Conclusions

When a patient with a history of wrapping of an aneurysm presents with acute neurological symptoms and an enhancing intracranial mass in the region of the surgical site on MR imaging, a muslin-induced foreign body inflammatory reaction should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and careful clinical and radiological follow-up is advised.

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Won-Sang Cho, Young Seob Chung, Jeong Eun Kim, Jin Pyeong Jeon, Young Je Son, Jae Seung Bang, Hyun-Seung Kang, Chul-Ho Sohn, and Chang Wan Oh

OBJECT

Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease and its natural history is still unclear. The authors aimed to investigate the natural course of hemodynamically stable cases of adult MMD, with the analysis of stroke risk factors.

METHODS

Two hundred forty-one patients were included in this retrospective study. One hundred sixty-six (68.9%) were female, and mean age (± SD) at first visit was 41.3 ± 12.0 years (range 18–69 years). Unilateral involvement was identified in 33 patients, and 19 patients (7.9%) had a family history of MMD. According to the clinical presentations, patients were classified into hemorrhagic (n = 62, 25.7%), ischemic (n = 144, 59.8%), and asymptomatic (n = 35, 14.5%) groups. The mean duration of follow-up was 82.5 ± 62.9 months (range 7.3–347.0 months).

RESULTS

The annual stroke risk was 4.5%, and the annual risks of rebleeding in the hemorrhagic group and recurrent ischemic events in the ischemic group were 4.3% and 3.0%, respectively. There was no significant difference in cumulative stroke risk between the 3 groups (p = 0.461). Risk factors included thyroid disease for overall strokes (HR 2.56, 95% CI 1.16–5.67), initial hemorrhagic presentation for hemorrhagic strokes (HR 2.53, 95% CI 1.24–5.17), and initial ischemic presentation for ischemic strokes (HR 2.69, 95% CI 1.15–6.27). Familial MMD was a common risk factor for all types of stroke. Among the 3 clinical groups, the hemorrhagic group showed the worst clinical status at discharge and at most recent follow-up. Twenty-three patients (9.5%) eventually underwent revascularization surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of stroke in the different clinical groups; clinical status, however, was most severe in patients with hemorrhagic presentation. In patients who experienced stroke during the follow-up period, the stroke type tended to correspond to their initial presentation. Close follow-up is needed in patients with thyroid disease and a family history of MMD.

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Jin Pyeong Jeon, Jeong Eun Kim, Jun Hyong Ahn, Won-Sang Cho, Young Dae Cho, Young-Je Son, Jae Seung Bang, Hyun-Seung Kang, Chul-Ho Sohn, Hyun-Tai Chung, Chang Wan Oh, and Dong Gyu Kim

OBJECT

Treatment strategies for venous-predominant arteriovenous malformation (vp-AVM) remain unclear due to the limited number of cases and a lack of long-term outcomes. The purpose of this study was to report the authors’ experience with treatment outcomes with a review of the pertinent literature in patients with vp-AVM.

METHODS

Medical and radiological data from 1998 to 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. The degree of the arteriovenous (AV) shunt was categorized into 2 groups, a high- and low-flow AV shunt based on the angiographic findings.

RESULTS

Sixteen patients with a mean age of 45.3 years (range 16–78 years) and a mean follow-up of 79.9 months (range 25–264 months) were examined. Symptomatic lesions were noted in 13 patients: intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in 9, seizure in 1, and headache in 3. A high-flow shunt was observed on angiography in 13 patients. Among these 13 patients, 12 patients were symptomatic. Nine patients presenting with ICH underwent hematoma removal with additional Gamma Knife surgery (GKS; n = 4), GKS only (n = 2), or conservative treatment (n = 3). The 3 asymptomatic patients received conservative treatment, and 1 rebleeding episode was observed. Seven of 8 patients who underwent GKS as an initial or secondary treatment modality experienced a marked reduction in the AV shunt on follow-up angiography, but complete obliteration was not observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Poor lesion localization makes a vp-AVM challenging to treat. Symptomatic patients with a high-flow shunt are supposedly best treated with GKS, despite the fact that only 87.5% of the vp-AVMs treated this way showed a reduction in the malformation volume, and none were cured.

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Il-Man Kim, Man-Bin Yim, Chang-Young Lee, Eun-Ik Son, Dong-Won Kim, Sang-Pyo Kim, and Chul-Ho Sohn

✓ In planning surgical treatment for extraaxial cavernous hemangiomas, care should be taken to control severe tumor bleeding. The authors present a case of a large cavernous hemangioma of the cavernous sinus, which was completely removed with the aid of multiple intratumoral injections of fibrin glue. This novel method is very effective for preventing excessive blood loss during surgery for this type of lesion.

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Roh-Eul Yoo, Tae Jin Yun, Young Dae Cho, Jung Hyo Rhim, Koung Mi Kang, Seung Hong Choi, Ji-hoon Kim, Jeong Eun Kim, Hyun-Seung Kang, Chul-Ho Sohn, Sun-Won Park, and Moon Hee Han

OBJECTIVE

Arterial spin labeling perfusion-weighted imaging (ASL-PWI) enables quantification of tissue perfusion without contrast media administration. The aim of this study was to explore whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) from ASL-PWI can reliably predict angiographic vascularity of meningiomas.

METHODS

Twenty-seven patients with intracranial meningiomas, who had undergone preoperative ASL-PWI and digital subtraction angiography prior to resection, were included. Angiographic vascularity was assessed using a 4-point grading scale and meningiomas were classified into 2 groups: low vascularity (Grades 0 and 1; n = 11) and high vascularity (Grades 2 and 3; n = 16). Absolute CBF, measured at the largest section of the tumor, was normalized to the contralateral gray matter. Correlation between the mean normalized CBF (nCBF) and angiographic vascularity was determined and the mean nCBF values of the 2 groups were compared. Diagnostic performance of the nCBF for differentiating between the 2 groups was assessed.

RESULTS

The nCBF had a significant positive correlation with angiographic vascularity (ρ = 0.718; p < 0.001). The high-vascularity group had a significantly higher nCBF than the low-vascularity group (3.334 ± 2.768 and 0.909 ± 0.468, respectively; p = 0.003). At the optimal nCBF cutoff value of 1.733, sensitivity and specificity for the differential diagnosis of the 2 groups were 69% (95% CI 41%–89%) and 100% (95% CI 72%–100%), respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.875 (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

ASL-PWI may provide a reliable and noninvasive means of predicting angiographic vascularity of meningiomas. It may thus assist in selecting potential candidates for preoperative digital subtraction angiography and embolization in clinical practice.