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Christopher I. Shaffrey

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Christopher I. Shaffrey and Justin S. Smith

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J. Patrick Johnson and Christopher I. Shaffrey

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Editorial

Thoracolumbar spinal deformity

Christopher I. Shaffrey

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Christopher I. Shaffrey

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Christopher I. Shaffrey and Justin S. Smith

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Gregory C. Wiggins, Stephen L. Ondra and Christopher I. Shaffrey

Iatrogenic loss of lordosis is now frequently recognized as a complication following placement of thoracolumbar instrumentation, especially with distraction instrumentation. Flat-back syndrome is characterized by forward inclination of the trunk, inability to stand upright, and back pain. Evaluation of the deformity should include a full-length lateral radiograph obtained with the patient's knees and hips fully extended. The most common cause of the deformity includes the use of distraction instrumentation in the lumbar spine and pseudarthrosis.

Surgical treatment described in the literature includes opening (Smith-Petersen) osteotomy, polysegmental osteotomy, and closing wedge osteotomy. The authors will review the literature, cause, clinical presentation, prevention, and surgical management of flat-back syndrome.

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Christopher I. Shaffrey and Justin S. Smith

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Christopher I. Shaffrey and Justin S. Smith

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Diana Barrett Wiseman, Richard Ellenbogen and Christopher I. Shaffrey

Triage for the neurosurgeon is a misnomer. The neurosurgeon's role within a mass-casualty situation is one of a subspecialist surgeon instead of a triage officer. Unfortunately because of the events of September 11, 2001, civilian neurosurgeons and other medical specialists have been questioning their role within a mass-casualty situation or, worse, a situation created by biological, chemical, or nuclear weapons. There is no single triage system used exclusively within the United States, and different systems have differing sensitivities, specificities, and labeling methods. The purpose of this article is to discuss varying aspects of triage for both military personnel and civilians and suggest how the neurosurgeon may help shape this process within his or her community. Furthermore, the effects of biological, chemical, and nuclear weapons will be discussed in relation to the triage system.