Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 37 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ching-Jen Chen x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Ching-Jen Chen, Dwight Saulle, Kai-Ming Fu, Justin S. Smith and Christopher I. Shaffrey

Object

This study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of and risk factors associated with the development of dysphagia following same-day combined anterior-posterior cervical spine surgeries.

Methods

The records of 30 consecutive patients who underwent same-day combined anterior-posterior cervical spine surgery were reviewed. The presence of dysphagia was assessed by a formalized screening protocol using history/clinical presentation and a bedside swallowing test, followed by formal evaluation by speech and language pathologists and/or fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing/modified barium swallow when necessary. Age, sex, previous cervical surgeries, diagnoses, duration of procedure, specific vertebral levels and number of levels operated on, degree of sagittal curve correction, use of anterior plate, estimated blood loss, use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and length of hospital stay following procedures were analyzed.

Results

In the immediate postoperative period, 13 patients (43.3%) developed dysphagia. Outpatient follow-up data were available for 11 patients with dysphagia, and within this subset, all cases of dysphagia resolved subjectively within 12 months following surgery. The mean numbers of anterior levels surgically treated in patients with and without dysphagia were 5.1 and 4.0, respectively (p = 0.004). All patients (100%) with dysphagia had an anterior procedure that extended above C-4, compared with 58.8% of patients without dysphagia (p = 0.010). Patients with dysphagia had significantly greater mean correction of C2–7 lordosis than patients without dysphagia (p = 0.020). The postoperative sagittal occiput–C2 angle and the change in this angle were not significantly associated with the occurrence of dysphagia (p = 0.530 and p = 0.711, respectively). Patients with postoperative dysphagia had significantly longer hospital stays than those who did not develop dysphagia (p = 0.004). No other significant difference between the dysphagia and no-dysphagia groups was identified; differences with respect to history of previous anterior cervical surgery (p = 0.141), use of an anterior plate (p = 0.613), and mean length of anterior cervical operative time (p = 0.541) were not significant.

Conclusions

The incidence of dysphagia following combined anterior-posterior cervical surgery in this study was comparable to that of previous reports. The risk factors for dysphagia that were identified in this study were increased number of anterior levels exposed, anterior surgery that extended above C-4, and increased surgical correction of C2–7 lordosis.

Restricted access

Thomas J. Buell, Davis G. Taylor, Ching-Jen Chen and Bhiken I. Naik

Free access

Ching-Jen Chen, Pedro Norat, Dale Ding, George A. C. Mendes, Petr Tvrdik, Min S. Park and M. Yashar Kalani

Endovascular embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is conventionally performed from a transarterial approach. Transarterial AVM embolization can be a standalone treatment or, more commonly, used as a neoadjuvant therapy prior to microsurgery or stereotactic radiosurgery. In contrast to the transarterial approach, curative embolization of AVMs may be more readily achieved from a transvenous approach. Transvenous embolization is considered a salvage therapy in contemporary AVM management. Proposed indications for this approach include a small (diameter < 3 cm) and compact AVM nidus, deep AVM location, hemorrhagic presentation, single draining vein, lack of an accessible arterial pedicle, exclusive arterial supply by perforators, and en passage feeding arteries. Available studies of transvenous AVM embolization in the literature have reported high complete obliteration rates, with reasonably low complication rates. However, evaluating the efficacy and safety of this approach is challenging due to the limited number of published cases. In this review the authors describe the technical considerations, indications, and outcomes of transvenous AVM embolization.

Full access

Panagiotis Mastorakos, Michael A. Hays, James P. Caruso, Ching-Jen Chen, Dale Ding, Davis G. Taylor, M. Beatriz Lopes and Mark E. Shaffrey

Optic nerve glioblastoma is a rare entity that usually presents with rapidly progressive vision loss, which eventually results in blindness and, ultimately, death. As with malignant gliomas in other anatomical locations, local recurrence is common. Isolated rapid changes in vision, atypical neuroimaging findings, and the rarity of optic nerve glioblastoma may render diagnosis challenging and, thus, delay treatment. The authors present a case of optic nerve glioblastoma that was treated with subtotal resection followed by adjuvant radiation therapy and temozolomide. One year following the initial diagnosis, the patient developed a right cerebellar lesion, which was histopathologically consistent with glioblastoma. This case represents the first report of transtentorial dissemination of an optic nerve glioblastoma. In addition, the authors reviewed the literature regarding optic nerve glioblastomas. Of the 73 previously reported cases of malignant optic nerve gliomas, 32 were histologically confirmed glioblastomas. The mean age at diagnosis was 62 years, and 56% were male; the median survival was 7 months. A malignant glioma of the optic nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with rapidly progressive visual loss. However, the incidence of optic nerve glioblastoma is exceedingly low.

Restricted access

Adeel Ilyas, Ching-Jen Chen, Dale Ding, Davis G. Taylor, Shayan Moosa, Cheng-Chia Lee, Or Cohen-Inbar and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Several recent studies have improved our understanding of the outcomes of volume-staged (VS) and dose-staged (DS) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of large (volume > 10 cm3) brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In light of these recent additions to the literature, the aim of this systematic review is to provide an updated comparison of VS-SRS and DS-SRS for large AVMs.

METHODS

A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed to identify cohorts of 5 or more patients with large AVMs who had been treated with VS-SRS or DS-SRS. Baseline data and post-SRS outcomes were extracted for analysis.

RESULTS

A total of 11 VS-SRS and 10 DS-SRS studies comprising 299 and 219 eligible patients, respectively, were included for analysis. The mean obliteration rates for VS-SRS and DS-SRS were 41.2% (95% CI 31.4%–50.9%) and 32.3% (95% CI 15.9%–48.8%), respectively. Based on pooled individual patient data, the outcomes for patients treated with VS-SRS were obliteration in 40.3% (110/273), symptomatic radiation-induced changes (RICs) in 13.7% (44/322), post-SRS hemorrhage in 19.5% (50/256), and death in 7.4% (24/323); whereas the outcomes for patients treated with DS-SRS were obliteration in 32.7% (72/220), symptomatic RICs in 12.2% (31/254), post-SRS hemorrhage in 10.6% (30/282), and death in 4.6% (13/281).

CONCLUSIONS

Volume-staged SRS appears to afford higher obliteration rates than those achieved with DS-SRS, although with a less favorable complication profile. Therefore, VS-SRS or DS-SRS may be a reasonable treatment approach for large AVMs, either as stand-alone therapy or as a component of a multimodality management strategy.

Restricted access

Davis G. Taylor, Ching-Jen Chen, Thomas J. Buell, Min S. Park, J. Javier Provencio and M. Yashar S. Kalani

Full access

Cheng-Chia Lee, Ching-Jen Chen, Benjamin Ball, David Schlesinger, Zhiyuan Xu, Chun-Po Yen and Jason Sheehan

OBJECT

Onyx, an ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer mixed in a dimethyl sulfoxide solvent, is currently one of the most widely used liquid materials for embolization of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The goal of this study was to define the risks and benefits of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients who have previously undergone partial AVM embolization with Onyx.

METHODS

Among a consecutive series of 199 patients who underwent SRS between January 2007 and December 2012 at the University of Virginia, 25 patients had Onyx embolization prior to SRS (the embolization group). To analyze the obliteration rates and complications, 50 patients who underwent SRS without prior embolization (the no-embolization group) were matched by propensity score method. The matched variables included age, sex, nidus volume before SRS, margin dose, Spetzler-Martin grade, Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale score, and median imaging follow-up period.

RESULTS

After Onyx embolization, 18 AVMs were reduced in size. Total obliteration was achieved in 6 cases (24%) at a median of 27.5 months after SRS. In the no-embolization group, total obliteration was achieved in 20 patients (40%) at a median of 22.4 months after SRS. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated obliteration rates of 17.7% and 34.1% in the embolization group at 2 and 4 years, respectively. In the no-embolization group, the corresponding obliteration rates were 27.0% and 55.9%. The between-groups difference in obliteration rates after SRS did not achieve statistical significance. The difference in complications, including adverse radiation effects, hemorrhage episodes, seizure control, and patient mortality also did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS

Onyx embolization can effectively reduce the size of many AVMs. This case-control study did not show any statistically significant difference in the rates of embolization or complications after SRS in patients who had previously undergone Onyx embolization and those who had not.

Free access

Adeel Ilyas, Ching-Jen Chen, Dale Ding, Andrew Romeo, Thomas J. Buell, Tony R. Wang, M. Yashar S. Kalani and Min S. Park

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and a significant source of long-term morbidity. Unfortunately, a substantial number of stroke patients either are ineligible or do not significantly benefit from contemporary medical and interventional therapies. To address this void, investigators recently made technological advances to render transcranial MR-guided, high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU) sonolysis a potential therapeutic option for both acute ischemic stroke (AIS)—as an alternative for patients with emergent large-vessel occlusion (ELVO) who are ineligible for endovascular mechanical thrombectomy (EMT) or as salvage therapy for patients in whom EMT fails—and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)—as a neoadjuvant means of clot lysis prior to surgical evacuation. Herein, the authors review the technological principles behind MRg-HIFU sonolysis, its results in in vitro and in vivo stroke models, and its potential clinical applications. As a noninvasive transcranial technique that affords rapid clot lysis, MRg-HIFU thrombolysis may develop into a therapeutic option for patients with AIS or ICH. However, additional studies of transcranial MRg-HIFU are necessary to ascertain the merit of this treatment approach for thrombolysis in both AIS and ICH, as well as its technical limitations and risks.

Restricted access

Adeel Ilyas, Ching-Jen Chen, Dale Ding, Panagiotis Mastorakos, Davis G. Taylor, I. Jonathan Pomeraniec, Cheng-Chia Lee and Jason Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Cyst formation can occasionally occur after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Given the limited data regarding post-SRS cyst formation in patients with AVM, the time course, natural history, and management of this delayed complication are poorly defined. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the incidence, time course, and optimal management of cyst formation after SRS for AVMs.

METHODS

A literature review was performed using PubMed to identify studies reporting cyst formation in AVM patients treated with SRS. Baseline and outcomes data, including the incidence and management of post-SRS cysts, were extracted from each study that reported follow-up duration. The mean time to cyst formation was calculated from the subset of studies that reported individual patient data.

RESULTS

Based on pooled data from 22 studies comprising the incidence analysis, the overall rate of post-SRS cyst formation was 3.0% (78/2619 patients). Among the 26 post-SRS cyst patients with available AVM obliteration data, nidal obliteration was achieved in 20 (76.9%). Of the 64 cyst patients with available symptomatology and management data, 21 (32.8%) were symptomatic; 21 cysts (32.8%) were treated with surgical intervention, whereas the remaining 43 (67.2%) were managed conservatively. Based on a subset of 19 studies reporting individual time-to-cyst-formation data from 63 patients, the mean latency period to post-SRS cyst formation was 78 months (6.5 years).

CONCLUSIONS

Cyst formation is an uncommon complication after SRS for AVMs, with a relatively long latency period. The majority of post-SRS cysts are asymptomatic and can be managed conservatively, although enlarging or symptomatic cysts may require surgical intervention. Long-term follow-up of AVM patients is crucial to the appropriate diagnosis and management of post-SRS cysts.

Restricted access

Davis G. Taylor, Thomas J. Buell, Tony R. Wang, Matthew J. Shepard, Dominic Maggio, Ching-Jen Chen, Min S. Park and Mark E. Shaffrey