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Chiman Jeon, Kyung Rae Cho, Jung Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

This study was performed to evaluate the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) as a primary treatment for central neurocytomas (CNs).

METHODS

The authors retrospectively assessed the treatment outcomes of patients who had undergone primary treatment with GKRS for CNs in the period between December 2001 and December 2018. The diagnosis of CN was based on findings on neuroimaging studies. The electronic medical records were retrospectively reviewed for additional relevant preoperative data, and clinical follow-up data had been obtained during office evaluations of the treated patients. All radiographic data were reviewed by a dedicated neuroradiologist.

RESULTS

Fourteen patients were treated with GKRS as a primary treatment for CNs in the study period. Seven patients (50.0%) were asymptomatic at initial presentation, and 7 (50.0%) presented with headache. Ten patients (71.4%) were treated with GKRS after the diagnosis of CN based on characteristic MRI findings. Four patients (28.6%) initially underwent either stereotactic or endoscopic biopsy before GKRS. The median tumor volume was 3.9 cm3 (range 0.46–18.1 cm3). The median prescription dose delivered to the tumor margin was 15 Gy (range 5.5–18 Gy). The median maximum dose was 30 Gy (range 11–36 Gy). Two patients were treated with fractionated GKRS, one with a prescription dose of 21 Gy in 3 fractions and another with a dose of 22 Gy in 4 fractions. Control of tumor growth was achieved in all 14 patients. The median volume reduction was 26.4% (range 0%–78.3%). Transient adverse radiation effects were observed in 2 patients but resolved with improvement in symptoms. No recurrences were revealed during the follow-up period, which was a median of 25 months (range 12–89 months).

CONCLUSIONS

Primary GKRS for CNs resulted in excellent tumor control rates without recurrences. These results suggest that GKRS may be a viable treatment option for patients with small- to medium-sized or incidental CNs.

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Chiman Jeon, Sang Duk Hong, Kyung In Woo, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

Orbital tumors are often surgically challenging because they require an extensive fronto-temporo-orbital zygomatic approach (FTOZ) and a multidisciplinary team approach to provide the best outcomes. Recently, minimally invasive endoscopic techniques via a transorbital superior eyelid approach (ETOA) or endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) have been proposed as viable alternatives to transcranial approaches for orbital tumors. In this study, the authors investigated the feasibility of 360° circumferential access to orbital tumors via both ETOA and EEA.

METHODS

Between April 2014 and June 2019, 16 patients with orbital tumors underwent either ETOA or EEA at the authors’ institution. Based on the neuro-topographic “four-zone model” of the orbit with its tumor epicenter around the optic nerve in the coronal plane, ETOA (n = 10, 62.5%) was performed for tumors located predominantly superolateral to the nerve and EEA (n = 6, 37.5%) for those located predominantly inferomedial to the nerve. Eight patients (50%) presented with intraconal tumors and 8 (50%) with extraconal ones. The orbital tumors included orbital schwannoma (n = 6), cavernous hemangioma (n = 2), olfactory groove meningioma (n = 1), sphenoorbital meningioma (n = 1), chondrosarcoma (n = 1), trigeminal schwannoma (n = 1), metastatic osteosarcoma (n = 1), mature cystic teratoma (n = 1), sebaceous carcinoma (n = 1), and ethmoid sinus osteoma (n = 1). The clinical outcomes and details of surgical techniques were reviewed.

RESULTS

Gross-total resection was achieved in 12 patients (75%), near-total resection in 3 (18.8%), and subtotal resection in 1 (6.2%). Eight (88.9%) of the 9 patients with preoperative proptosis showed improvement after surgery, and 4 (66.7%) of the 6 patients with visual symptoms demonstrated improvement. Four (40%) of the 10 patients treated with ETOA experienced partial third nerve palsy immediately after surgery (3 transient and 1 persistent). There have been no postoperative CSF leaks or infections in this series.

CONCLUSIONS

Without transcranial approaches requiring temporalis muscle dissection and orbitozygomatic osteotomy, the selection of ETOA or EEA based on a concept of a four-zone model with its epicenter around the optic nerve successfully provides a minimally invasive 360° circumferential access to the entire orbit with acceptable morbidity.

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Chiman Jeon, Chang-Ki Hong, Kyung In Woo, Sang Duk Hong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Jung Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

Tumors involving Meckel’s cave remain extremely challenging because of the surrounding complex neurovascular structures and deep-seated location. The authors investigated a new minimal-access technique using the endoscopic transorbital approach (eTOA) through the superior eyelid crease to Meckel’s cave and middle cranial fossa lesions and reviewed the most useful surgical procedures and pitfalls of this approach.

METHODS

Between September 2016 and January 2018, the authors performed eTOA in 9 patients with tumors involving Meckel’s cave and the middle cranial fossa. The lesions included trigeminal schwannoma in 4 patients, meningioma in 2 patients, metastatic brain tumor in 1 patient, chondrosarcoma in 1 patient, and dermoid cyst in 1 patient. In 7 of the 9 patients, eTOA alone was performed, while the other 2 patients underwent a combined eTOA and endoscopic endonasal approach or retrosigmoid craniotomy. Data including details of surgical techniques and clinical outcomes were recorded.

RESULTS

Gross-total resection was performed in 7 of the 9 patients (77.8%). Four patients underwent extended eTOA (with lateral orbital rim osteotomy). Drilling of the trapezoid sphenoid floor, a middle fossa “peeling” technique, and full visualization of Meckel’s cave were applied to approach the lesions. Tumors were exposed and removed extradurally in 3 patients and intradurally in 6 patients. There was no postoperative CSF leak.

CONCLUSIONS

The eTOA affords a direct route to access Meckel’s cave and middle cranial fossa lesions. With experience, this novel approach can be successfully applied to selected skull base lesions. To achieve successful removal of the tumor, emphasis should be placed on the importance of adequately removing the greater sphenoid wing and vertical crest. However, because of limited working space eTOA may not be an ideal approach for posterior fossa lesions.

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Yong Hwy Kim, Chiman Jeon, Young-Bem Se, Sang Duk Hong, Ho Jun Seol, Jung-II Lee, Chul-Kee Park, Dong Gyu Kim, Hee-Won Jung, Doo Hee Han, Do-Hyun Nam and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic endonasal approach for treating primary skull base malignancies involving the clivus is a formidable task. The authors hypothesized that tumor involvement of nearby critical anatomical structures creates hurdles to endoscopic gross-total resection (GTR). The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach to treat primary malignancies involving the clivus and to analyze prognostic factors for GTR.

METHODS

Between January 2009 and November 2015, 42 patients underwent the endoscopic endonasal approach for resection of primary skull base malignancies involving the clivus at 2 independent institutions. Clinical data; tumor locations within the clivus; and anatomical involvement of the cavernous or paraclival internal carotid artery, cisternal trigeminal nerve, hypoglossal canal, and dura mater were investigated to assess the extent of resection. Possible prognostic factors affecting GTR were also analyzed.

RESULTS

Of the 42 patients, 37 were diagnosed with chordomas and 5 were diagnosed with chondrosarcomas. The mean (± SD) preoperative tumor volume was 25.2 ± 30.5 cm3 (range 0.8–166.7 cm3). GTR was achieved in 28 patients (66.7%) and subtotal resection in 14 patients (33.3%). All tumors were classified as upper (n = 17), middle (n = 17), or lower (n = 8) clival tumors based on clival involvement, and as central (24 [57.1%]) or paramedian (18 [42.9%]) based on laterality of the tumor. Univariate analysis identified the tumor laterality (OR 6.25, 95% CI 1.51–25.86; p = 0.011) as significantly predictive of GTR. In addition, the laterality of the tumor was found to be a statistically significant predictor in multivariate analysis (OR 41.16, 95% CI 1.12–1512.65; p = 0.043).

CONCLUSIONS

An endoscopic endonasal approach can provide favorable clinical and surgical outcomes. However, the tumor laterality should be considered as a potential obstacle to total removal.