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Chih-Hsiang Liao, Wen-Hsien Chen, Nien-Chen Liao and Yuang-Seng Tsuei

This video presents a case of new-onset visual blurring, diplopia, and conjunctival injection after head injury. CTA of the brain revealed a direct carotid-cavernous fistula (dCCF) of the right side. Careful evaluation of CTA source images revealed that the fistula point was at the ventromedial aspect of the right cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA), about 3.6 × 3.6 mm2 in size, with 3 main outflow channels (2 intracranial and 1 extracranial) (CTA-guided concept). DSA of the brain also confirmed the diagnosis but was unable to locate the fistula point in a large-sized dCCF. Through a transfemoral artery approach, 3 microcatheters were navigated to each peripheral channel to initiate outflow-targeted embolization. Intracranial refluxes were blocked first to avoid cerebral hemorrhages, followed by the extracranial outflow. During embolization, accidental dislodge of one coil into the sphenoparietal vein occurred, but no attempt of coil retrieval was made. Complete obliteration of the dCCF was achieved, and the patient recovered well without new neurological deficits. 4D MRA at the 3-month follow-up showed no residual dCCF.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/LH2lNVRZSPk.

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Chih-Hsiang Liao, Jui-To Wang, Chun-Fu Lin, Shao-Ching Chen, Chung-Jung Lin, Sanford P. C. Hsu and Min-Hsiung Chen

OBJECTIVE

Despite the advances in skull base techniques, large petroclival meningiomas (PCMs) still pose a challenge to neurosurgeons. The authors’ objective of this study was to describe a pretemporal trans–Meckel’s cave transtentorial approach for large PCMs and to report the surgical outcomes.

METHODS

From 2014 to 2017, patients harboring large PCMs (> 3 cm) and undergoing their first resection via this procedure at the authors’ institute were included. In combination with pretemporal transcavernous and anterior transpetrosal approaches, the trans–Meckel’s cave transtentorial route was created. Surgical details are described and a video demonstrating the procedure is included. Retrospective review of the medical records and imaging studies was performed.

RESULTS

A total of 18 patients (6 men and 12 women) were included in this study, with mean age of 53 years. The mean sizes of the preoperative and postoperative PCMs were 4.36 cm × 4.09 cm × 4.13 cm (length × width × height) and 0.83 cm × 1.08 cm × 0.75 cm, respectively. Gross-total removal was performed in 7 patients, near-total removal (> 95%) in 7 patients, and subtotal removal in 4 patients (> 90% in 3 patients and > 85% in 1 patient). There were no surgical deaths or patients with postoperative hemiplegia. Surgical complications included transient cranial nerve (CN) III palsy (all patients, resolved in 3 months), transient CN VI palsy (2 patients), CN IV palsy (3 patients, partial recovery), hydrocephalus (3 patients), and CSF otorrhea (1 patient). Temporal lobe retraction–related neurological deficits were not observed.

CONCLUSIONS

A pretemporal trans–Meckel’s cave transtentorial approach offers large surgical exposure and multiple trajectories to the suprasellar, interpeduncular, prepontine, and upper-half clival regions without overt traction, which is mandatory to remove large PCMs. To unlock Meckel’s cave where a large PCM lies abutting the cave, pretemporal transcavernous and anterior transpetrosal approaches are prerequisites to create adequate exposure for the final trans–Meckel’s cave step.

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Chien-Lun Tang, Chih-Hsiang Liao, Wen-Hsien Chen, Shih-Chieh Shen, Chung-Hsin Lee, Hsu-Tung Lee and Yuang-Seng Tsuei

Endovascular embolization is the treatment of choice for carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs), but failure to catheterize the cavernous sinus may occur as a result of vessel tortuosity, hypoplasia, or stenosis. In addition to conventional transvenous or transarterial routes, alternative approaches should be considered. The authors present a case in which a straightforward route to the CCF was accessed via transsphenoidal puncture of the cavernous sinus in a neurosurgical hybrid operating suite.

This 82-year-old man presented with severe chemosis and proptosis of the right eye. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a Type B CCF with a feeding artery arising from the meningohypophyseal trunk of the right cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. The CCF drained through a thrombosed right superior ophthalmic vein that ended deep in the orbit; there were no patent sinuses or venous plexuses connecting to the CCF. An endoscope-assisted transsphenoidal puncture created direct access to the nidus for embolization. Embolic agents were deployed through the puncture needle to achieve complete obliteration. Endoscope-assisted transsphenoidal puncture of the cavernous sinus is a feasible alternative to treat difficult-to-access CCFs in a neurosurgical hybrid operating suite.

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Chih-Hsiang Liao, Chung-Jung Lin, Chun-Fu Lin, Hsin-Yi Huang, Min-Hsiung Chen, Sanford P. C. Hsu and Yang-Hsin Shih

OBJECTIVE

The treatment of paraclinoid aneurysms remains challenging. It is important to determine the exact location of the paraclinoid aneurysm when considering treatment options. The authors herein evaluated the effectiveness of using the optic strut (OS) and tuberculum sellae (TS) as radiographic landmarks for distinguishing between intradural and extradural paraclinoid aneurysms on source images from CT angiography (CTA).

METHODS

Between January 2010 and September 2013, a total of 49 surgical patients with the preoperative diagnoses of paraclinoid aneurysm and 1 symptomatic cavernous-clinoid aneurysm were retrospectively identified. With the source images from CTA, the OS and the TS were used as landmarks to predict the location of the paraclinoid aneurysm and its relation to the distal dural ring (DDR). The operative findings were examined to confirm the definitive location of the paraclinoid aneurysm. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the diagnostic effectiveness of the landmarks.

RESULTS

Nineteen patients without preoperative CTA were excluded. The remaining 30 patients comprised the current study. The intraoperative findings confirmed 12 intradural, 12 transitional, and 6 extradural paraclinoid aneurysms, the diagnoses of which were significantly related to the type of aneurysm (p < 0.05) but not factors like sex, age, laterality of aneurysm, or relation of the aneurysm to the ophthalmic artery on digital subtraction angiography. To measure agreement with the correct diagnosis, the OS as a reference point was far superior to the TS (Cohen's kappa coefficients 0.462 and 0.138 for the OS and the TS, respectively). For paraclinoid aneurysms of the medial or posterior type, using the base of the OS as a reference point tended to overestimate intradural paraclinoid aneurysms. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that if the aneurysmal neck traverses the axial plane 2 mm above the base of the OS, the aneurysm is most likely to grow across the DDR and present as a transitional aneurysm (sensitivity 0.806; specificity 0.792).

CONCLUSIONS

High-resolution thin-cut CTA is a fast and crucial tool for diagnosing paraclinoid aneurysms. The OS serves as an effective landmark in CTA source images for distinguishing between intradural and extradural paraclinoid aneurysms. The DDR is supposed to be located 2 mm above the base of the OS in axial planes.

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Chih-Hsiang Liao, Chun-Fu Lin, Sanford PC. Hsu, Min-Hsiung Chen and Yang-Hsin Shih

Symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm is rare. Cranial nerves in the cavernous sinus are subjected to the mass effect of an expanding aneurysm. Microsurgical clipping is the treatment of choice to relieve compressive cranial neuropathy. In this video, the authors present a case of intracavernous aneurysm causing diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness. The patient was operated on via a pretemporal transclinoid-transcavernous approach. The aneurysm was completely obliterated through direct clipping. There were no new-onset neurologic deficits and complications after the operation. Complete recovery of the diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness was observed at the 6-month postoperative follow up.

The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/4w5QUoNIAQM.

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Chih-Hsiang Liao, Jau-Ching Wu, Wen-Cheng Huang, Wei-Hsin Wang, Peng-Yuan Chang, Henrich Cheng and Yang-Shih

Surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniation is technically challenging from anterior, lateral or posterior approaches. Because of the deeply located thoracic discs and non-retractable thoracic thecal sac, standard anterior and lateral procedures for discectomy require extensive tissue dissection causing prolonged lengths of stay in hospital. In this video, the authors present a case of calcified disc herniation at the level of T10/11 causing paraplegia and voiding difficulty. The patient was operated on via an endoscope-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal thoracic interbody fusion (EA-TTIF). The herniated disc and calcification were removed through a 26-mm tubular retractor, under microscopes via a unilateral transpedicular approach. The endoscopes were used for direct visualization of the ventral thecal sac and confirmation of complete decompression. After the operation, the patient's neurological function completely recovered. Minimally invasive EA-TTIF is a viable and effective option for the surgical management of thoracic disc herniation. Thoracic interbody fusion can be achieved through a minimally invasive approach from the back.

The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/54rRMtvSyCM.