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Arthur R. Elvidge, Charles L. Branch and Gordon B. Thompson

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Brian J. McHugh, Jacob F. Baranoski, Ajay Malhotra, Alexander O. Vortmeyer, Gordon Sze and Charles C. Duncan

Intracranial infantile hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are exceedingly rare lesions. Only 11 cases have been previously reported in the literature. As such, little is known about the etiology, long-term prognosis, and optimal treatment paradigm. Clinically, they are consistently less aggressive than those in adults. The authors present the case of a 2-month-old boy with an intracranial HPC, review the available literature, discuss the evolving concepts of what defines an HPC, and offer a potential explanation to how HPC histology might relate to the clinical behavior of these lesions.

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Paul Douglas Garen, Clive Gordon Harper, Charles Teo and Ian Hugh Johnston

✓ A case is reported of a rare cystic schwannoma of the fourth cranial nerve which was interpreted as a probable intrinsic brain-stem lesion. The clinical approach to brain-stem tumors in terms of empirical treatment or surgical biopsy is discussed.

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Dario J. Englot, John D. Rolston, Doris D. Wang, Kevin H. Hassnain, Charles M. Gordon and Edward F. Chang

Object

In the US, approximately 500,000 individuals are hospitalized yearly for traumatic brain injury (TBI), and posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a common sequela of TBI. Improved treatment strategies for PTE are critically needed, as patients with the disorder are often resistant to antiepileptic medications and are poor candidates for definitive resection. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an adjunctive treatment for medically refractory epilepsy that results in a ≥ 50% reduction in seizure frequency in approximately 50% of patients after 1 year of therapy. The role of VNS in PTE has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with PTE attain more favorable seizure outcomes than individuals with nontraumatic epilepsy etiologies.

Methods

Using a case-control study design, the authors retrospectively compared seizure outcomes after VNS therapy in patients with PTE versus those with nontraumatic epilepsy (non-PTE) who were part of a large prospectively collected patient registry.

Results

After VNS therapy, patients with PTE demonstrated a greater reduction in seizure frequency (50% fewer seizures at the 3-month follow-up; 73% fewer seizures at 24 months) than patients with non-PTE (46% fewer seizures at 3 months; 57% fewer seizures at 24 months). Overall, patients with PTE had a 78% rate of clinical response to VNS therapy at 24 months (that is, ≥ 50% reduction in seizure frequency) as compared with a 61% response rate among patients with non-PTE (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.07–1.61), leading to improved outcomes according to the Engel classification (p < 0.0001, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel statistic).

Conclusions

Vagus nerve stimulation should be considered in patients with medically refractory PTE who are not good candidates for resection. A controlled prospective trial is necessary to further examine seizure outcomes as well as neuropsychological outcomes after VNS therapy in patients with intractable PTE.

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Iain H. Kalfas, Donald W. Kormos, Michael A. Murphy, Rick L. McKenzie, Gene H. Barnett, Gordon R. Bell, Charles P. Steiner, Mary Beth Trimble and Joseph P. Weisenberger

✓ Interactive frameless stereotaxy has been successfully applied to intracranial surgery. It has contributed to the improved localization of deep-seated brain lesions and has demonstrated a potential for reducing both operative time and morbidity. However, it has not been as effectively applied to spinal surgery.

The authors describe the application of frameless stereotactic techniques to spinal surgery, specifically pedicle screw fixation of the lumbosacral spine. Preoperative axial computerized tomography (CT) images of the appropriate spinal segments are obtained and loaded onto a high-speed graphics supercomputer workstation. Intraoperatively, these images can be linked to the appropriate spinal anatomy by a sonic localization digitizer device that is interfaced with the computer workstation. This permits the surgeon to place a pointing device (sonic wand) on any exposed spinal bone landmark in the operative field and obtain multiplanar reconstructed CT images projected in near-real time on the workstation screen. The images can be manipulated to assist the surgeon in determining the proper entry point for a pedicle screw as well as defining the appropriate trajectory in the axial and sagittal planes. It can also define the correct screw length and diameter for each pedicle to be instrumented.

The authors applied this device to the insertion of 150 screws into the lumbosacral spines of 30 patients. One hundred forty-nine screws were assessed to be satisfactorily placed by postoperative CT and plain film radiography. In this report the authors discuss their use of this device in the clinical setting and review their preliminary results of frameless stereotaxy applied to spinal surgery. On the basis of their findings, the authors conclude that frameless stereotactic technology can be successfully applied to spinal surgery.

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Domagoj Coric, Pierce D. Nunley, Richard D. Guyer, David Musante, Cameron N. Carmody, Charles R. Gordon, Carl Lauryssen, Donna D. Ohnmeiss and Margaret O. Boltes

Object

Cervical total disc replacement (CTDR) represents a relatively novel procedure intended to address some of the shortcomings associated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) by preserving motion at the treated level. This prospective, randomized, multicenter study evaluates the safety and efficacy of a new metal-on-metal CTDR implant (Kineflex|C) by comparing it with ACDF in the treatment of single-level spondylosis with radiculopathy.

Methods

The study was a prospective, randomized US FDA Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) pivotal trial conducted at 21 centers across the US. The primary clinical outcome measures included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), visual analog scale (VAS) scores, and a composite measure of clinical success. Patients were randomized to CTDR using the Kineflex|C (SpinalMotion, Inc.) cervical artificial disc or ACDF using structural allograft and an anterior plate.

Results

A total of 269 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to either CTDR (136 patients) or to ACDF (133 patients). There were no significant differences between the CTDR and ACDF groups when comparing operative time, blood loss, length of hospital stay, or the reoperation rate at the index level. The overall success rate was significantly greater in the CTDR group (85%) compared with the ACDF group (71%) (p = 0.05). In both groups, the mean NDI scores improved significantly by 6 weeks after surgery and remained significantly improved throughout the 24-month follow-up (p < 0.0001). Similarly, the VAS pain scores improved significantly by 6 weeks and remained significantly improved through the 24-month follow-up (p < 0.0001). The range of motion (ROM) in the CTDR group decreased at 3 months but was significantly greater than the preoperative mean at 12- and 24-month follow-up. The ROM in the ACDF group was significantly reduced by 3 months and remained so throughout the follow-up. Adjacent-level degeneration was also evaluated in both groups from preoperatively to 2-year follow-up and was classified as none, mild, moderate, or severe. Preoperatively, there were no significant differences between groups when evaluating the different levels of adjacent-level degeneration. At the 2-year follow-up, there were significantly more patients in the ACDF group with severe adjacent-level radiographic changes (p < 0.0001). However, there were no significant differences between groups in adjacent-level reoperation rate (7.6% for the Kineflex|C group and 6.1% for the ACDF group).

Conclusions

Cervical total disc replacement allows for neural decompression and clinical results comparable to ACDF. Kineflex|C was associated with a significantly greater overall success rate than fusion while maintaining motion at the index level. Furthermore, there were significantly fewer Kineflex|C patients showing severe adjacent-level radiographic changes at the 2-year follow-up. These results from a prospective, randomized study support that Kineflex|C CTDR is a viable alternative to ACDF in select patients with cervical radiculopathy.

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Domagoj Coric, Richard D. Guyer, Pierce D. Nunley, David Musante, Cameron Carmody, Charles Gordon, Carl Lauryssen, Margaret O. Boltes and Donna D. Ohnmeiss

OBJECTIVE

Seven cervical total disc replacement (TDR) devices have received FDA approval since 2006. These devices represent a heterogeneous assortment of implants made from various biomaterials with different biomechanical properties. The majority of these devices are composed of metallic endplates with a polymer core. In this prospective, randomized multicenter study, the authors evaluate the safety and efficacy of a metal-on-metal (MoM) TDR (Kineflex|C) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the treatment of single-level spondylosis with radiculopathy through a long-term (5-year) follow-up.

METHODS

An FDA-regulated investigational device exemption (IDE) pivotal trial was conducted at 21 centers across the United States. Standard validated outcome measures including the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and visual analog scale (VAS) for assessing pain were used. Patients were randomized to undergo TDR using the Kineflex|C cervical artificial disc or anterior cervical fusion using structural allograft and an anterior plate. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after surgery. Serum ion analysis was performed on a subset of patients randomized to receive the MoM TDR.

RESULTS

A total of 269 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to undergo either TDR (136 patients) or ACDF (133 patients). There were no significant differences between the TDR and ACDF groups in terms of operative time, blood loss, or length of hospital stay. In both groups, the mean NDI scores improved significantly by 6 weeks after surgery and remained significantly improved throughout the 60-month follow-up (both p < 0.01). Similarly, VAS pain scores improved significantly by 6 weeks and remained significantly improved through the 60-month follow-up (both p < 0.01). There were no significant changes in outcomes between the 24- and 60-month follow-ups in either group. Range of motion in the TDR group decreased at 3 months but was significantly greater than the preoperative mean value at the 12- and 24-month follow-ups and remained significantly improved through the 60-month period. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of reoperation/revision surgery or device-/surgery-related adverse events. The serum ion analysis revealed cobalt and chromium levels significantly lower than the levels that merit monitoring.

CONCLUSIONS

Cervical TDR with an MoM device is safe and efficacious at the 5-year follow-up. These results from a prospective randomized study support that Kineflex|C TDR as a viable alternative to ACDF in appropriately selected patients with cervical radiculopathy.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00374413 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Pierce D. Nunley, Marcus B. Stone, Michael S. Hisey, Kee D. Kim, Robert J. Jackson, Hyun W. Bae, Gregory A. Hoffman, Steven E. Gaede, Guy O. Danielson III, Charles Gordon, Reginald J. Davis and Bimal Rami

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Reginald J. Davis, Pierce Dalton Nunley, Kee D. Kim, Michael S. Hisey, Robert J. Jackson, Hyun W. Bae, Gregory A. Hoffman, Steven E. Gaede, Guy O. Danielson III, Charles Gordon and Marcus B. Stone

OBJECT

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of 2-level total disc replacement (TDR) using a Mobi-C cervical artificial disc at 48 months' follow-up.

METHODS

A prospective randomized, US FDA investigational device exemption pivotal trial of the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc was conducted at 24 centers in the US. Three hundred thirty patients with degenerative disc disease were randomized and treated with cervical total disc replacement (225 patients) or the control treatment, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) (105 patients). Patients were followed up at regular intervals for 4 years after surgery.

RESULTS

At 48 months, both groups demonstrated improvement in clinical outcome measures and a comparable safety profile. Data were available for 202 TDR patients and 89 ACDF patients in calculation of the primary endpoint. TDR patients had statistically significantly greater improvement than ACDF patients for the following outcome measures compared with baseline: Neck Disability Index scores, 12-Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Component Summary scores, patient satisfaction, and overall success. ACDF patients experienced higher subsequent surgery rates and displayed a higher rate of adjacent-segment degeneration as seen on radiographs. Overall, TDR patients maintained segmental range of motion through 48 months with no device failure.

CONCLUSIONS

Four-year results from this study continue to support TDR as a safe, effective, and statistically superior alternative to ACDF for the treatment of degenerative disc disease at 2 contiguous cervical levels.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00389597 (clinicaltrials.gov)