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Si Zhang, Hexiang Zhao, Hao Li, Chao You and Xuhui Hui

OBJECTIVE

Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a life-saving treatment for severe hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). However, the correlations between the clinicoradiological features and surgical outcomes of this disease are not well established. Therefore, the authors endeavored to analyze the potential risk factors for this more severe subtype of CVT and to provide more evidence regarding the benefits of DC in patients with hemorrhagic CVT.

METHODS

The clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical outcomes of patients with severe hemorrhagic CVT who had undergone DC treatment in the period from January 2005 to March 2015 were retrospectively analyzed, and the risk factors for this disease were evaluated.

RESULTS

Fifty-eight patients, 39 females (67.2%) and 19 males (32.8%), with a mean age of 39.7 ± 12.5 years, were included in this study. The mean duration from symptom onset to surgery was 3.3 ± 1.9 days, and 21 patients experienced acute courses. On neuroimaging, the mean mass lesion volume was 114.7 ± 17.7 ml. Nine patients had bilateral lesions, and 7 patients had deep CVT. According to their hemorrhagic proportion, cases were divided into hemorrhage-dominated (27 [46.6%]) and edema-dominated (31 [53.4%]) groups. After 6 months of follow-up, 56.9% of patients had achieved a favorable outcome, and 8 patients had died. The hemorrhage-dominated lesions (p = 0.026) and deep cerebral venous involvement (p = 0.026) were significantly associated with a poor outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients suffering from severe hemorrhagic CVT, DC is an effective life-saving treatment that is associated with favorable outcomes. Hemorrhage-dominated lesions and deep cerebral venous involvement have a significant impact on the outcome of this disease.

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Wen-Han Hu, Chao Zhang, Kai Zhang, Xiao-Qiu Shao and Jian-Guo Zhang

OBJECT

Conflicting conclusions have been reported regarding several factors that may predict seizure outcomes after hemispheric surgery for refractory epilepsy. The goal of this study was to identify the possible predictors of seizure outcome by pooling the rates of postoperative seizure freedom found in the published literature.

METHODS

A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library identified English-language articles published since 1970 that describe seizure outcomes in patients who underwent hemispheric surgery for refractory epilepsy. Two reviewers independently assessed article eligibility and extracted the data. The authors pooled rates of seizure freedom from papers included in the study. Eight potential prognostic variables were identified and dichotomized for analyses. The authors also compared continuous variables within seizure-free and seizure-recurrent groups. Random- or fixed-effects models were used in the analyses depending on the presence or absence of heterogeneity.

RESULTS

The pooled seizure-free rate among the 1528 patients (from 56 studies) who underwent hemispheric surgery was 73%. Patients with an epilepsy etiology of developmental disorders, generalized seizures, nonlateralization on electroencephalography, and contralateral MRI abnormalities had reduced odds of being seizure-free after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Hemispheric surgery is an effective therapeutic modality for medically intractable epilepsy. This meta-analysis provides useful evidence-based information for the selection of candidates for hemispheric surgery, presurgical counseling, and explanation of seizure outcomes.

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Wen-Han Hu, Chao Zhang, Kai Zhang, Fan-Gang Meng, Ning Chen and Jian-Guo Zhang

Object

Whether selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SelAH) has similar seizure outcomes and better neuropsychological outcomes compared with anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) is a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to compare the 2 types of surgery with respect to seizure outcomes and changes in IQ scores.

Methods

PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant studies published between January 1990 and September 2012. Studies comparing SelAH and ATL with respect to seizure and intelligence outcomes were included. Two reviewers assessed the quality of the included studies and independently extracted the data. Odds ratios and standardized mean deviations with 95% confidence intervals were used to compare pooled proportions of freedom from seizures and changes in IQ scores between the SelAH and ATL groups.

Results

Three prospective and 10 retrospective studies were identified involving 745 and 766 patients who underwent SelAH and ATL, respectively. The meta-analysis demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in the odds of seizure freedom for patients who underwent SelAH compared with those who underwent ATL (OR 0.65 [95% CI 0.51–0.82], p = 0.0005). The differences between the changes in all IQ scores after the 2 types of surgery were not statistically significant, regardless of the side of resection.

Conclusions

Selective amygdalohippocampectomy statistically reduced the odds of being seizure free compared with ATL, but the clinical significance of this reduction needs to be further validated by well-designed randomized trials. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy did not have better outcomes than ATL with respect to intelligence.

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Nicholas M. Barbaro

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Jun Yan, Jing Wen, Roodrajeetsing Gopaul, Chao-Yuan Zhang and Shao-wen Xiao

OBJECT

There have been many multidisciplinary approaches to the treatment of vein of Galen malformations. Endovascular embolization is the first option for treatment. However, the effects of the treatment remain controversial. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of endovascular embolization to treat patients with vein of Galen malformations.

METHODS

This paper includes a retrospective analysis of a sample of 667 patients who underwent endovascular embolization to treat vein of Galen malformations. The data were obtained through a literature search of PubMed databases. The authors also evaluate the efficacy and safety of the treatment. Mortality within the follow-up period is analyzed. Pooled estimates of proportions with corresponding 95% CIs were calculated using raw (i.e., untransformed) proportions (PRAW).

RESULTS

In the 34 studies evaluated, neonates accounted for 44% of the sample (95% CI 31%-57%; I2 = 92.5%), infants accounted for 41% (95% CI 30%–51%; I2 = 83.3%), and children and adults accounted for 12% (95% CI 7%–16%; I2 = 52.9%). The meta-analysis revealed that complete occlusion was performed in 57% (95% CI 48%–65%; I2 = 68.2%) of cases, with partial occlusion in 43% (95% CI 34%–51%; I2 = 70.7%). The pooled proportion of patients showing a good outcome was 68% (95% CI 61%–76%; I2 = 77.8%), while 31% showed a poor outcome (95% CI 24%–38%; I2 = 75.6%). The proportional meta-analysis showed that postembolization mortality and complications were reported in 10% (95% CI 8%–12%; I2 = 42.8%) and 37% (95% CI 29%–45%; I2 = 79.1%), respectively. Complications included cerebral hemorrhage, cerebral ischemia, hydrocephalus, leg ischemia, and vessel perforation.

CONCLUSIONS

The successful treatment of vein of Galen malformations remains a complex therapeutic challenge. The authors’ analysis of clinical history and research literature suggests that vein of Galen malformations treated with endovascular embolization can result in an acceptable mortality rate, complications, and good clinical outcome. Future large-scale, multicenter, randomized trials are necessary to confirm these findings.

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Kai Shen, Zhongliang Deng, Junsong Yang, Chao Liu and Ranxi Zhang

OBJECTIVE

Atlantoaxial instability is usually corrected by anterior and/or posterior C1–2 fusion. However, fusion can lead to considerable loss of movement at the C1–2 level, which can adversely impact a patient’s quality of life. In this study, the authors investigated the stability and function of a novel posterior artificial atlanto-odontoid joint (NPAAJ) by using cadaveric cervical spines.

METHODS

The Oc–C7 regions from 10 cadaveric spines were used for anteroposterior (AP) translation and range of motion (ROM) tests while intact and after destabilization, NPAAJ implantation, and double-rod fixation.

RESULTS

The mean AP C1–2 translational distances in the intact, destabilization, and double-rod groups were 6.53 ± 1.07 mm, 11.54 ± 1.59 mm, and 3.24 ± 0.99 mm, respectively, and the AP translational distance in the NPAAJ group was significantly different from that in the intact group (p < 0.05). The AP translational distance in the NPAAJ group was not significantly different from that in the double-rod group (p = 0.24). The mean flexion, extension, and axial rotation ROM values of the NPAAJ group were 9.87° ± 0.91°, 8.75° ± 0.99°, and 61.93° ± 2.93°, respectively, and these were lower than the corresponding values in the intact group (p < 0.05). The mean lateral bending ROM in the NPAAJ group (9.26° ± 0.86°) was not significantly different from that in the intact group (p = 0.23), and the flexion, extension, and rotation ranges in the NPAAJ group were 79.5%, 85.2%, and 82.3%, respectively, of those in the intact group.

CONCLUSIONS

Use of NPAAJ for correction of atlantoaxial instability disorders caused by congenital odontoid dysplasia, odontoid fracture nonunion, and C-1 transverse ligament disruption (IA, IB, and IIB) may restore the stability and preserve most of the ROM of C1–2. Additionally, the NPAAJ may prevent soft tissue from embedding within the joint. However, additional studies should be performed before the NPAAJ is used clinically.

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Hong-Qi Zhang, Ling-Qiang Chen, Shao-Hua Liu, Di Zhao and Chao-Feng Guo

Object

The object of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of posterior decompression with kyphosis correction for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) at the same level.

Methods

Between January 2003 and December 2005, 11 patients (8 men and 3 women) with thoracic myelopathy due to OLF and OPLL at the same level underwent posterior decompressive laminectomy and excision of OLF. Posterior instrumentation was also performed for stabilization of the spine and reducing the thoracic kyphosis angle by approximately 5–15° (kyphosis correction), and spinal fusion was performed in all cases. The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 4 years (mean 2.8 years). The outcomes were evaluated using a recovery scale based on the Japanese Orthopaedic Association classification. The score of each patient was calculated before surgery, 1 year after surgery, and at the final follow-up visit.

Results

After surgery, the thoracic kyphosis in the stabilization area was reduced from 30.0 ± 4.02° to 20.8 ± 2.14° on average. The mean score on the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale improved from 3.5 ± 1.69 preoperatively to 8.5 ± 1.63 at the final follow-up, with a recovery rate of 68.0%. The results were good in 9 patients and fair in 2 patients. Postoperative MR imaging showed that the spinal cord was shifted posteriorly and decompressed completely in all cases. Myelopathy was not aggravated in any case after surgery.

Conclusions

A considerable degree of neurological recovery was observed after posterior decompression and kyphosis correction. The procedure is easy to perform with a low risk of postoperative paralysis. The authors therefore suggest that the procedure is useful for patients whose spinal cords are severely impinged by OLF and OPLL at the same level.

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Jian-Bin Chen, Ding Lei, Min He, Hong Sun, Yi Liu, Heng Zhang, Chao You and Liang-Xue Zhou

OBJECT

The present study aimed to clarify the incidence and clinical features of disease progression in adult moyamoya disease (MMD) patients with Graves disease (GD) for better management of these patients.

METHODS

During the past 18 years, 320 adult Chinese patients at West China Hospital were diagnosed with MMD, and 29 were also diagnosed with GD. A total of 170 patients (25 with GD; 145 without GD) were included in this study and were followed up. The mean follow-up was 106.4 ± 48.6 months (range 6–216 months). The progression of the occlusive lesions in the major intracranial arteries was measured using cerebral angiography and was evaluated according to Suzuki's angiographic staging. Information about cerebrovascular strokes was obtained from the records of patients' recent clinical visits. Both angiographic progression and strokes were analyzed to estimate the incidences of angiographic progression and strokes using Kaplan-Meier analysis. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to test the effects of sex, age at MMD onset, disease type, strokes, and GD on the onset of MMD progression during follow-up.

RESULTS

During follow-up, the incidence of disease progression in MMD patients with GD was significantly higher than in patients without GD (40.0% vs 20.7%, respectively; p = 0.036). The interval between initial diagnosis and disease progression was significantly shorter in MMD patients with GD than in patients without GD (p = 0.041). Disease progression occurred in both unilateral MMD and bilateral MMD, but the interval before disease progression in patients with unilateral disease was significantly longer than in patients with bilateral disease (p = 0.021). The incidence of strokes in MMD patients with GD was significantly higher than in patients without GD (48% vs 26.2%, respectively; p = 0.027). The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed significant differences in the incidence of disease progression (p = 0.038, log-rank test) and strokes (p = 0.031, log-rank test) between MMD patients with GD and those without GD. Multivariate analysis suggested that GD may contribute to disease progression in MMD (OR 5.97, 95% CI 1.24–33.76, p = 0.043).

CONCLUSIONS

The incidence of disease progression in MMD patients with GD was significantly higher than that in MMD patients without GD, and GD may contribute to disease progression in MMD patients. The incidence of strokes was significantly higher in MMD patients with GD than in patients without GD. Management guidelines for MMD patients with GD should be developed.

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Binsheng You, Yanhao Cheng, Jian Zhang, Qimin Song, Chao Dai, Xueyuan Heng and Chang Fei

OBJECT

The goal of this study was to investigate the significance of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) MRI-based 3D reconstruction of dural tail sign (DTS) in meningioma resection.

METHODS

Between May 2013 and August 2014, 18 cases of convexity and parasagittal meningiomas showing DTS on contrast-enhanced T1W MRI were selected. Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction of DTS was conducted before surgical treatment. The vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR images and 3D reconstruction images were measured and compared. Surgical incisions were designed by referring to the 3D reconstruction and MR images, and then the efficiency of the 2 methods was evaluated with assistance of neuronavigation.

RESULTS

Three-dimensional reconstruction of DTS can reveal its overall picture. In most cases, the DTS around the tumor is uneven, whereas the DTS around the dural vessels presents longer extensions. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS measured on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR and 3D reconstruction images. The 3D images of DTS were more intuitive, and the overall picture of DTS could be revealed in 1 image, which made it easier to design the incision than by using the MR images. Meanwhile, assessment showed that the incisions designed using 3D images were more accurate than those designed using MR images (ridit analysis by SAS, F = 7.95; p = 0.008). Pathological examination showed that 34 dural specimens (except 2 specimens from 1 tumor) displayed tumor invasion. The distance of tumor cell invasion was 1.0–21.6 mm (5.4 ± 4.41 mm [mean ± SD]). Tumor cell invasion was not observed at the dural resection margin in all 36 specimens.

CONCLUSIONS

Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction can intuitively and accurately reveal the size and shape of DTS, and thus provides guidance for designing meningioma incisions.