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Kwang-Chun Cho, Jung-Jae Kim, Chang-Ki Jang, Chang-Ki Hong, Jin-Yang Joo and Yong Bae Kim

OBJECTIVE

Rete middle cerebral artery (MCA) is extremely rare and has not been frequently discussed. Rete MCA is a weblike anomaly of the MCA that does not coalesce and forms a prominent, large single branch from the plexiform vessels in the fetal stage. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the clinical and radiological characteristics of patients with rete MCA.

METHODS

A total of 2262 cerebral digital subtraction angiography procedures were performed on 1937 patients at the authors’ institution from February 2013 to May 2017. Data analysis included age, sex, clinical symptoms, underlying diseases, coexisting cerebral arterial anomalies, and operative methods and findings.

RESULTS

Rete MCAs were found in 13 patients, and the incidence of this anomaly was 0.67% (13 of 1937) in this study. Of the 13 patients, 3 had hemorrhagic strokes, 6 had ischemic strokes, and 4 had no symptoms. Eight patients underwent conservative treatment, and 5 patients underwent surgical treatment. Rete MCA is considered a congenital disease of the cerebral vasculature with the possibility of an acquired abnormality, such as an aneurysm, caused by hemodynamic stress. Although an epidemiological survey of rete MCA was not conducted, it is assumed that rete MCA has a high prevalence in Asia. Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke events are fairly common in rete MCA.

CONCLUSIONS

Clinicians should understand the radiological and clinical features of patients with rete MCA to avoid misdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment. This anomaly should be differentiated from other vascular diseases and patients presenting incidentally should be carefully monitored because of their vulnerability to both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes.

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Yeon Soo Choo, Joonho Chung, Jin-Yang Joo, Yong Bae Kim and Chang-Ki Hong

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to determine predisposing factors for good clinical outcome in patients with spontaneous basal ganglia hemorrhage with borderline volumes (defined as a hematoma volume between 20 and 50 cm3) who had undergone treatment by stereotactic catheter drainage.

METHODS

From the 298 patients whose information had been prospectively collected in the institutional database between January 2010 and December 2013, 93 patients were included in this retrospective study and divided into 2 groups: best medical treatment alone (Group A, n = 44) and best medical treatment plus catheterization (Group B, n = 49). All patients met the following criteria: 1) a diagnosis of spontaneous basal ganglia hemorrhage, and 2) a borderline hematoma volume (20 to 50 cm3). Postoperative modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores and recovery of motor weakness were compared between the 2 groups, and predisposing factors for good clinical outcome were evaluated.

RESULTS

Patients in Group B showed earlier recovery of motor weakness and improved mRS scores than patients in Group A. The final mRS score at 12 months was better in Group B than in Group A (p = 0.006). Predisposing factors for a good clinical outcome were a hematoma volume < 30 cm3 (OR 6.158, 95% CI 1.221–31.053, p = 0.028), an initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≥ 13 (OR 6.331, 95% CI 1.129–35.507, p = 0.036), the absence of internal capsule involvement (OR 4.680, 95% CI 1.152–19.010, p = 0.031), and catheterization (OR 13.376, 95% CI 2.423–73.842, p = 0.003) based on logistic regression analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

Good clinical outcome can be expected after stereotactic catheter drainage in patients with a hematoma volume between 20 and 30 cm3, an initial GCS score ≥ 13, and the absence of internal capsule involvement. Among these patients, stereotactic catheter drainage may have a beneficial effect on early recovery of motor weakness and functional outcome, indicating that lateral-type basal ganglia hematoma compression not involving the internal capsule may be better treated using stereotactic catheter drainage than treated medically.

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Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Sung-Hye Park, Seok Ho Hong, Kyu-Chang Wang and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

Immature teratomas of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare neoplasms. Although adjuvant therapy is generally recommended after resection, the exact role of each therapeutic modality is not yet established. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinicopathological correlation and the role of resection to define the optimal treatment modalities for immature teratomas of the CNS.

Methods

Between 1987 and 2002, eight patients underwent radical surgery for a lesion diagnosed as a CNS immature teratoma at the authors' institution. The clinical courses of these patients and the pathological features of their tumors were retrospectively reviewed.

Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in six patients at the initial operation. The mean follow-up period was 75 months. Two patients received postoperative adjuvant therapies and two patients did not, against medical advice. None of the four patients experienced recurrence after long-term follow up. Another four patients, all of whom underwent GTR of the tumor, did not receive adjuvant therapy as part of a prospective treatment scheme. One of them exhibited early recurrence and metastasis. The tumor had pathological features denoting a high-grade (Norris Grade III) lesion and neurocytomatous differentiation.

Conclusions

Aggressive resection seems to be of utmost importance in the treatment of immature teratomas of the CNS. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be deferred if GTR is achieved in low-grade, immature teratomas, but adjuvant therapies may be warranted for high-grade ones.

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Mohammad Abolfotoh, Wenya Linda Bi, Chang-Ki Hong, Kaith K. Almefty, Abraham Boskovitz, Ian F. Dunn and Ossama Al-Mefty

OBJECT

The combined microscopic and endoscopic technique has shown significant advantages in the management of various lesions through different approaches. Endoscopic-assisted techniques have frequently been applied to cerebellopontine angle (CPA) surgery in the context of minimally invasive craniotomies. In this paper the authors report on the use of the endoscope in the CPA as a tool to increase the extent of resection, minimize complications, and preserve the function of the delicate CPA structures. They also describe a technique of the simultaneous use of the microscope and endoscope in the CPA and dissection of CPA tumors under tandem endoscopic and microscopic vision to overcome the shortcomings of introducing the endoscope alone in the CPA. The reliability of using the microscope alone in dissecting CPA tumors is evaluated, as is the effectiveness of the combined technique in increasing the resectability of various types of CPA tumors.

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of 50 patients who underwent combined microscopic-endoscopic resection of CPA tumors by the senior author over a period of 3 years (February 2011 to February 2014) at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School. The reliability of the extent of microscopic removal was evaluated with endoscopic exploration. Additional resection was performed with both microscopic and the combined microscopic-endoscopic technique. Endoscopically verified total resection was validated by intraoperative or postoperative MRI. The function of the cranial nerves was evaluated to assess the impact of the combined technique on their function.

RESULTS

A tumor remnant was endoscopically identified in 69% of the 26 patients who were believed to have microscopic total resection. The utilization of the endoscopic visualization and dissection increased endoscopically verified total removal to 38 patients, and 82% of these patients had no sign of residual tumor on postoperative imaging. The technique was most effective with epidermoid tumors. There were a total of 17 new cranial nerve deficits in 10 patients. Preoperative fifth cranial nerve deficits improved in 52% and hearing improved in 29% of patients after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

This method provides simultaneous microscopic and endoscopic visualization and dissection techniques through skull-base approaches to CPA tumors. It overcomes some of the shortcomings of endoscopic-assisted surgery, further extends the surgical field, and increases the radicality of tumor resection with good functional outcomes.

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Joonho Chung, Sang Hyun Suh, Chang-Ki Hong, Jin-Yang Joo, Yong Cheol Lim, Yong Sam Shin and Yong Bae Kim

OBJECT

The purpose of this study was to report the authors' preliminary experience using self-expanding closed-cell stents deployed in small arteries (< 2 mm in diameter) to treat intracranial aneurysms.

METHODS

A total of 31 patients were studied. All subjects met the following criteria: 1) they received an Enterprise stent for treatment of a wide-necked aneurysm or a dissecting aneurysm or as part of a stent-salvage procedure; and 2) they had an Enterprise stent deployed in a small parent artery (< 2 mm in diameter) that had no atherosclerotic stenosis. Procedure-related complications and follow-up sizes of the parent arteries were evaluated for safety and patency.

RESULTS

There were 16 ruptured aneurysms and 15 unruptured aneurysms. Three (9.7%) of the 31 patients experienced procedure-related complications, and they all were asymptomatic. Follow-up angiography was performed in 27 patients (87.1%) (at a mean 15.5 months after surgery). Parent arteries with 2 acute angles (n = 4) were occluded in 3 cases (75.0%), and those with no acute angles (n = 13) or 1 acute angle (n = 6) showed 100% patency on follow-up angiography. There was a significant difference between the follow-up sizes (mean 1.72 ± 0.30 mm) of parent arteries and their sizes (mean 1.59 ± 0.26 mm) before treatment (95% CI − 0.254 to − 0.009 mm; p = 0.037, paired-samples t-test).

CONCLUSIONS

In the current series the deployment of self-expanding closed-cell stents in small arteries was safe and resulted in good patency, especially when the stents were deployed in segments of the parent artery with no acute angles or only 1 acute angle.

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Jin S. Yeom, Kyeong Hwan Kim, Soon Woo Hong, Kun-Woo Park, Bong-Soon Chang, Choon-Ki Lee and Jacob M. Buchowski

✓ Surgical treatment of intraforaminal disc herniations at the L5–S1 level is technically demanding. The 2 most commonly used procedures involve either a medial or lateral ipsilateral approach and often require a partial or even complete facet resection, which may in turn result in vertebral instability and/or back pain, as well as, in some cases, a fusion or stabilization procedure. In this report, the authors present a new minimally invasive technique for the treatment of L5–S1 intraforaminal disc herniations. Using this technique, which involves tubular retractors and an operative microscope to approach the neural foramen from the contralateral side, the authors could easily visualize and remove the herniated disc material and perform a thorough microdiscectomy with minimal resection of osseous and ligamentous structures. To illustrate this new minimally invasive technique for the treatment of intraforaminal disc herniations at L5–S1, they describe the cases of 2 patients who underwent the procedure and in whom successful results were achieved.

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Doo-Sik Kong, Stephanie Ming Young, Chang-Ki Hong, Yoon-Duck Kim, Sang Duk Hong, Jung Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol, Jung-Il Lee, Hyung Jin Shin, Do-Hyun Nam and Kyung In Woo

OBJECTIVE

Cranioorbital tumors are complex lesions that involve the deep orbit, floor of the frontal bone, and lesser and greater wing of the sphenoid bone. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and ophthalmological outcomes with an endoscopic transorbital approach (TOA) in the management of cranioorbital tumors involving the deep orbit and intracranial compartment.

METHODS

The authors performed endoscopic TOAs via the superior eyelid crease incision in 18 patients (16 TOA alone and 2 TOA combined with a simultaneous endonasal endoscopic resection) with cranioorbital tumors from September 2016 to November 2017. There were 12 patients with sphenoorbital meningiomas. Other lesions included osteosarcoma, plasmacytoma, sebaceous gland carcinoma, intraconal schwannoma, cystic teratoma, and fibrous dysplasia. Ten patients had primary lesions and 8 patients had recurrent tumors. Thirteen patients had intradural lesions, while 5 had only extradural lesions.

RESULTS

Of 18 patients, 7 patients underwent gross-total resection of the tumor and 7 patients underwent planned near-total resection of the tumor, leaving the cavernous sinus lesion. Subtotal resection was performed in 4 patients with recurrent tumors. There was no postoperative CSF leak requiring reconstruction surgery. Fourteen of 18 patients (77.8%) had preoperative proptosis on the ipsilateral side, and all 14 patients had improvement in exophthalmos; the mean proptosis reduced from 5.7 ± 2.7 mm to 1.5 ± 1.4 mm. However, some residual proptosis was evident in 9 of the 14 (64%). Ten of 18 patients (55.6%) had preoperative optic neuropathy, and 6 of them (60.0%) had improvement; the median best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/100 to 20/40. Thirteen of 18 patients showed mild ptosis at an immediate postoperative examination, all of whom had a spontaneous and complete recovery of their ptosis during the follow-up period. Three of 7 patients showed improvement in extraocular motility after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Endoscopic TOA can be considered as an option in the management of cranioorbital tumors involving complex anatomical areas, with acceptable sequelae and morbidity.

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Chang Sub Lee, Seok Ho Hong, Kyu-Chang Wang, Seung-Ki Kim, Joong Shin Park, Jong-Kwan Jun, Bo Hyun Yoon, Young-Ho Lee, Son Moon Shin, Yeon Kyung Lee and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

The prognosis of fetal ventriculomegaly (FVM) varies because of the disease’s heterogeneity and the diversity of accompanying anomalies. Moreover, the cases that are referred to neurosurgeons may have different clinical features from those typically encountered by obstetricians. The object of this study was to delineate the prognosis of FVM in cases for which neurosurgical consultation was sought.

Methods

Forty-four cases of FVM that were diagnosed before birth and referred to neurosurgeons for prenatal consultation were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-five of the 44 patients had accompanying anomalies, but in only three (12%) of the cases were they detected prenatally. Postnatal imaging studies revealed that agenesis of the corpus callosum (nine cases) was the most common associated anomaly. Neuronal migration disorders, periventricular leukomalacia, and arachnoid cysts were present in four cases each, and aqueductal stenosis was present in three cases.

Thirty-three patients were followed up longer than 11 months; in 15 (45%) delayed cognitive and/or motor development was documented, and all had accompanying anomalies. All 10 of the patients with isolated FVM exhibited normal development during the follow-up period. Eleven (25%) of the 44 patients underwent neurosurgical interventions for ventriculomegaly, which included ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement in seven cases. Four patients (9%) died.

Conclusions

The authors conclude that delayed development and disturbed functional status in patients in whom FVM was diagnosed prenatally are closely related to the presence of certain accompanying anomalies. On postnatal examination, more than half of the patients in whom the diagnosis of FVM was based on ultrasonography findings and whose parents were offered prenatal neurosurgical consultation were found to have additional anomalies that were not detected prenatally. Because of the possibility of additional undiagnosed anomalies, consulting neurosurgeons should be cautious in giving a prognosis in cases of FVM, even when prenatal ultrasonography reveals isolated ventriculomegaly and tests for intrauterine infection and chromosomal abnormality yield negative results.

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Tae Hoon Roh, Seok-Gu Kang, Ju Hyung Moon, Kyoung Su Sung, Hun Ho Park, Se Hoon Kim, Eui Hyun Kim, Chang-Ki Hong, Chang-Ok Suh and Jong Hee Chang

OBJECTIVE

Following resection of glioblastoma (GBM), microscopic remnants of the GBM tumor remaining in nearby tissue cause tumor recurrence more often than for other types of tumors, even after gross-total resection (GTR). Although surgical oncologists traditionally resect some of the surrounding normal tissue, whether further removal of nearby tissue may improve survival in GBM patients is unknown. In this single-center retrospective study, the authors assessed whether lobectomy confers a survival benefit over GTR without lobectomy when treating GBMs in the noneloquent area.

METHODS

The authors selected 40 patients who had undergone GTR of a histopathologically diagnosed isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)–wild type GBM in the right frontal or temporal lobe and divided the patients into 2 groups according to whether GTR of the tumor involved lobectomy, defined as a supratotal resection (SupTR group, n = 20) or did not (GTR group, n = 20). Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scores were compared between groups (p ≤ 0.05 for statistically significant differences).

RESULTS

The median postoperative PFS times for each group were as follows: GTR group, 11.5 months (95% CI 8.8–14.2) and SupTR group, 30.7 months (95% CI 4.3–57.1; p = 0.007). The median postoperative OS times for each group were as follows: GTR group, 18.7 months (95% CI 14.3–23.1) and SupTR group, 44.1 months (95% CI 25.1–63.1; p = 0.040). The mean postoperative KPS scores (GTR, 76.5; SupTR, 77.5; p = 0.904) were not significantly different. In multivariate analysis, survival for the SupTR group was significantly longer than that for the GTR group in terms of both PFS (HR 0.230; 95% CI 0.090–0.583; p = 0.002) and OS (HR 0.247; 95% CI 0.086–0.704; p = 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS

In cases of completely resectable, noneloquent-area GBMs, SupTR provides superior PFS and OS without negatively impacting patient performance.

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Chiman Jeon, Chang-Ki Hong, Kyung In Woo, Sang Duk Hong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Jung Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

Tumors involving Meckel’s cave remain extremely challenging because of the surrounding complex neurovascular structures and deep-seated location. The authors investigated a new minimal-access technique using the endoscopic transorbital approach (eTOA) through the superior eyelid crease to Meckel’s cave and middle cranial fossa lesions and reviewed the most useful surgical procedures and pitfalls of this approach.

METHODS

Between September 2016 and January 2018, the authors performed eTOA in 9 patients with tumors involving Meckel’s cave and the middle cranial fossa. The lesions included trigeminal schwannoma in 4 patients, meningioma in 2 patients, metastatic brain tumor in 1 patient, chondrosarcoma in 1 patient, and dermoid cyst in 1 patient. In 7 of the 9 patients, eTOA alone was performed, while the other 2 patients underwent a combined eTOA and endoscopic endonasal approach or retrosigmoid craniotomy. Data including details of surgical techniques and clinical outcomes were recorded.

RESULTS

Gross-total resection was performed in 7 of the 9 patients (77.8%). Four patients underwent extended eTOA (with lateral orbital rim osteotomy). Drilling of the trapezoid sphenoid floor, a middle fossa “peeling” technique, and full visualization of Meckel’s cave were applied to approach the lesions. Tumors were exposed and removed extradurally in 3 patients and intradurally in 6 patients. There was no postoperative CSF leak.

CONCLUSIONS

The eTOA affords a direct route to access Meckel’s cave and middle cranial fossa lesions. With experience, this novel approach can be successfully applied to selected skull base lesions. To achieve successful removal of the tumor, emphasis should be placed on the importance of adequately removing the greater sphenoid wing and vertical crest. However, because of limited working space eTOA may not be an ideal approach for posterior fossa lesions.