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Yu-Shu Yen, Li-Min Sun, Cheng-Li Lin, Shih-Ni Chang, Fung-Chang Sung, and Chia-Hung Kao

Object

Evidence suggests that hormones play a role in modifying both uterine myoma (UM) and meningioma. A number of studies have observed the positive association between these diseases. The aim of the current population-based study was to determine if women with UM are at a higher risk for meningioma.

Methods

The authors used data from the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan for the study. The UM cohort contained 281,244 women. Each woman was randomly frequency-matched with 4 women without UM, based on age, index year of diagnosis, occupation, urbanization (urbanization level was categorized by the population density of the residential area into 4 levels, with Level 1 as the most urbanized and Level 4 as the least urbanized), and comorbidity, to form the control cohort. Cox's proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted to estimate the influence of UM on the meningioma risk.

Results

Among women with UM, the risk of developing meningioma was significantly higher (45%) than among women without UM (95% CI 1.23–1.70). The same phenomenon was observed among most age groups, but a significant difference was only seen in the middle-age range. For women with UM, further analysis did not show a significant change after myomectomy. The cumulative incidence of meningioma between groups with and without UM differed over time.

Conclusions

The nationwide population-based cohort study found that Taiwanese women with UM are at higher risk for developing meningioma.

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Jung-Tung Liu, Cho-shun Li, Cheng-Siu Chang, and Wen-Jui Liao

OBJECT

Long-term follow-up study is required for verifying whether the clinical outcomes of kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty are altered. The authors' findings showed only subtle differences between these operations within a 5-year period. However, they still suggest the use of vertebroplasty over kyphoplasty in view of the treatment costs. In their previous study, the authors performed a short-term prospective comparison between vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. Vertebroplasty was recommended instead of kyphoplasty for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) because of the subtle differences between this procedure and kyphoplasty and the treatment costs. To determine whether these clinical outcomes persist in the long term, they continued to observe the patients from their short-term study over a longer-term period.

METHODS

One hundred cases of VCF were assigned randomly to either the kyphoplasty or the vertebroplasty group. In cement augmentation, the authors used polymethylmethacrylate as bone filler. Pain was assessed by using a visual analog scale (VAS). For each patient, vertebral body height and wedge angle were measured from reconstructed CT images.

RESULTS

The duration of the follow-up period was 5 years. Vertebral body height, kyphotic wedge angle, and VAS score were not evidently altered. Eight patients in the kyphoplasty group had an adjacent fracture after the procedure, whereas 7 patients in the vertebroplasty group had an adjacent fracture after the procedure. These adjacent fractures occurred within 1 year of surgery in both treatment groups except in 1 kyphoplasty-treated patient in whom the adjacent fracture was noted 16 months after treatment. Three patients in the vertebroplasty group had a nonadjacent fracture, and 4 patients in the kyphoplasty group had a nonadjacent fracture. The link between angular correction and the occurrence of adjacent fracture was statistically significant in the vertebroplasty group.

CONCLUSIONS

Excessive angular correction is a critical concern in the risk of adjacent fracture after vertebroplasty. Given the subtle differences between vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty observed over the course of 5 years, vertebroplasty remains the preferred option in view of the costs.

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Zhiming Tu, Yawei Li, Lei Li, Guohua Lv, and Bing Wang

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Tsung-Hsi Tu, Chih-Chang Chang, Jau-Ching Wu, Li-Yu Fay, Wen-Cheng Huang, and Henrich Cheng

The most commonly accepted indications for cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) are 1- and 2-level cervical disc herniation or spondylosis causing radiculopathy or myelopathy that is refractory to medical management. Unlike anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), which eliminates motion, CDA aims to restore the physiological range of motion of the indexed joint. Thus, the effect of indirect decompression gained by the insertion of a sufficiently large interbody graft and incorporation into arthrodesis after ACDF cannot be duplicated for CDA. For patients undergoing CDA, during extreme flexion/extension or rotation, the exiting nerve roots might be impinged by inadequately decompressed foraminal osteophytes. Therefore, the authors advocate generous decompression, including resection of the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) and bilateral uncovertebral joints (UVJs), even in the asymptomatic side. This video demonstrates full dural expansion and enlarged neuroforamen after removal of the PLL and UVJs. Venous hemorrhage encountered during foraminotomy can always be controlled by cottonoid packing or hemostatic agents. Also, the endplates of the surrounding vertebral bodies were meticulously prepared for parallel insertion of the ProDisc-C Nova (DePuy Synthes Spine) artificial disc. Please note that the ProDisc-C Nova is currently not available on the US market.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/XUo34j6WFYs.

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Hui-Ren Tao, Tian-Li Yang, Michael S. Chang, Huan Li, Da-Wei Zhang, Hong-Bin Fan, Chao Shen, and Zhuo-Jing Luo

Tethered cord is a common finding in congenital scoliosis. The most frequently advocated approach for this condition is to perform prophylactic detethering of the cord before scoliosis corrective surgery. The authors report on a 14-year-old patient with congenital thoracic kyphoscoliosis associated with a tethered cord, who developed progressive paraparesis and was successfully treated by posterior spine shortening osteotomy alone without prophylactic untethering. The patient had a 103° scoliotic curve together with a 93° kyphotic curve with an apical vertebra of T-7. Furthermore, he developed a significant progression of neurological deficits, including weakness of both legs and urinary and bowel incontinence. Preoperative MRI revealed that the spinal cord was entrapped by the apical vertebra and the low-placed conus medullaris was at approximately L-5. A posterior vertebral column resection of T-7 was performed for the purpose of simultaneously correcting the kyphoscoliosis and releasing tension on the tethered cord without a true detethering surgery. The patient's spinal cord function recovered completely from Frankel D to Frankel E by 6 months after the procedure. Evaluation at 31 months after surgery showed maintenance of good curve correction and normal neurological function.

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Hsuan-Kan Chang, Chih-Chang Chang, Tsung-Hsi Tu, Jau-Ching Wu, Wen-Cheng Huang, Li-Yu Fay, Peng-Yuan Chang, Ching-Lan Wu, and Henrich Cheng

OBJECTIVE

Many reports have successfully demonstrated that cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) can preserve range of motion after 1- or 2-level discectomy. However, few studies have addressed the extent of changes in segmental mobility after CDA or their clinical correlations.

METHODS

Data from consecutive patients who underwent 1-level CDA were retrospectively reviewed. Indications for surgery were medically intractable degenerative disc disease and spondylosis. Clinical outcomes, including visual analog scale (VAS)–measured neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, were analyzed. Radiographic outcomes, including C2–7 Cobb angle, the difference between pre- and postoperative C2–7 Cobb angle (ΔC2–7 Cobb angle), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), the difference between pre- and postoperative SVA (ΔSVA), segmental range of motion (ROM), and the difference between pre- and postoperative ROM (ΔROM), were assessed for their association with clinical outcomes. All patients underwent CT scanning, by which the presence and severity of heterotopic ossification (HO) were determined during the follow-up.

RESULTS

A total of 50 patients (mean age 45.6 ± 9.33 years) underwent a 1-level CDA (Prestige LP disc) and were followed up for a mean duration of 27.7 ± 8.76 months. All clinical outcomes, including VAS, NDI, and JOA scores, improved significantly after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative ROM values were similar (mean 9.5° vs 9.0°, p > 0.05) at each indexed level. The mean changes in segmental mobility (ΔROM) were −0.5° ± 6.13°. Patients with increased segmental mobility after surgery (ΔROM > 0°) had a lower incidence of HO and HO that was less severe (p = 0.048) than those whose ΔROM was < 0°. Segmental mobility (ROM) was significantly lower in patients with higher HO grade (p = 0.012), but it did not affect the clinical outcomes. The preoperative and postoperative C2–7 Cobb angles and SVA remained similar. The postoperative C2–7 Cobb angles, SVA, ΔC2–7 Cobb angles, and ΔSVA were not correlated to clinical outcomes after CDA.

CONCLUSIONS

Segmental mobility (as reflected by the mean ROM) and overall cervical alignment (i.e., mean SVA and C2–7 Cobb angle) had no significant impact on clinical outcomes after 1-level CDA. Patients with increased segmental mobility (ΔROM > 0°) had significantly less HO and similarly improved clinical outcomes than those with decreased segmental mobility (ΔROM < 0°).

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Gordon Li, Steven Chang, John R. Adler Jr., and Michael Lim

✓ Glomus jugulare tumors are rare, slow-growing vascular lesions that arise from the chief cells of the paraganglia within the jugular bulb. They can be associated with the tympanic branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve (Jacobsen nerve) or the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold nerve) and are also referred to as chemodectomas or nonchromaffin paragangliomas. Optimal treatment of these histologically benign tumors remains controversial. Surgery remains the treatment of choice, but can carry high morbidity rates. External-beam radiation was originally used for subtotal resections and in patients who were poor surgical candidates; however, radiosurgery has recently been introduced as an effective and safe treatment option for patients with these tumors. In this article the authors discuss the history of radiation therapy for glomus jugulare tumors, focusing on recent radiosurgical results.

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Chang-Po Kuo, Li-Li Wen, Chun-Mei Chen, Billy Huh, Chen-Hwan Cherng, Chih-Shung Wong, Wen-Jinn Liaw, Chun-Chang Yeh, Bo-Feng Lin, and Ching-Tang Wu

Object

Baicalein has been shown to offer neuroprotection in the ischemic brain, but its effect in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is unknown. The authors used a double-hemorrhage model to study the role of early baicalein treatment in SAH.

Methods

Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in male Wistar rats through a repeat injection of autologous blood at a 48-hour interval. Rats subjected or not subjected to SAH received a 30-mg/kg baicalein injection 3 hours after SAH and daily for 6 consecutive days, and results were compared with those obtained in vehicle-treated control rats. Mortality of the rats was recorded. Neurological outcome was assessed daily. Cerebrospinal fluid dialysates were collected and examined for glutamate concentrations. Cerebral vasospasm (CVS), brain water content, neuron variability, expression of glutamate transporter–1 (GLT-1), immunoreactivity of astrocyte, and level of malondialdehyde, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase in brain tissues content were determined on post-SAH Day 7.

Results

Mortality rate, neuronal degeneration, brain water content, and CVS were decreased and neurological function improved in the baicalein-treated rats. Baicalein increased astrocyte activity and preserved GLT-1, which attenuated the glutamate surge after SAH. Baicalein also provided antioxidative stress by preserving activities of SOD and catalase and decreased malondialdehydelevel after SAH. The glutamate, body weight, neurological scores, and glial fibrillary acidic protein activity were significantly correlated. The CVS was correlated with neuronal degeneration, and GLT-1 was correlated with oxidative stress.

Conclusions

Early baicalein treatment attenuated CVS and limited neurological injury following SAH. These data may indicate clinical utility for baicalein as an adjunct therapy to reduce brain injury and improve patient outcomes.

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Hsuan-Kan Chang, Huang-Chou Chang, Jau-Ching Wu, Tsung-Hsi Tu, Li-Yu Fay, Peng-Yuan Chang, Ching-Lan Wu, Wen-Cheng Huang, and Henrich Cheng

OBJECT

The aim of this paper was to investigate the risk of recurrence of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in patients with scoliosis who underwent microdiscectomy.

METHODS

A series of consecutive patients who underwent microdiscectomy for LDH was retrospectively reviewed. The inclusion criteria were young adults younger than 40 years who received microdiscectomy for symptomatic 1-level LDH. An exclusion criterion was any previous spinal surgery, including fusion or correction of scoliosis. The patients were divided into 2 groups: those with scoliosis and those without scoliosis. The demographic data in the 2 groups were similar. All medical records and clinical and radiological evaluations were reviewed.

RESULTS

A total of 58 patients who underwent 1-level microdiscectomy for LDH were analyzed. During the mean follow-up of 24.6 months, 6 patients (10.3%) experienced a recurrence of LDH with variable symptoms. The recurrence rate was significantly higher among the scoliosis group than the nonscoliosis group (33.3% vs 2.3%, p = 0.001). Furthermore, the recurrence-free interval in the scoliosis group was short.

CONCLUSIONS

Young adults (< 40 years) with uncorrected scoliosis are at higher risk of recurrent LDH after microdiscectomy.