Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Cesare Zoia x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Cesare Zoia, Paolo Gaetani, Iacopo Dallan, Davide Lepera, Paolo Battaglia, Paolo Castelnuovo, and Antonio Fratto

Full access

Cesare Zoia, Daniele Bongetta, Cristiano Alicino, Marcella Chimenti, Raffaelino Pugliese, and Paolo Gaetani

OBJECTIVE

In this paper, the authors sought to verify whether corset adoption could improve the short-term and midterm outcome scores of patients after single-level lumbar discectomy.

METHODS

A monocentric, randomized controlled trial of 54 consecutive patients who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy at the authors’ institution was performed from September 2014 to August 2015. Patients were randomly assigned to use or not use a lumbar corset in the upright position. Patients with previous interventions for disc herniation or with concomitant canal or foraminal stenosis were excluded. The visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire were used to compare groups at the 1- and 6-month follow-up time points.

RESULTS

No significant differences between the 2 groups were reported at either time point for any given outcome irrespective of the scale used.

CONCLUSIONS

Corset adoption does not improve the short-term and midterm outcomes of patients after single-level lumbar discectomy.

Free access

Ismail Zaed, Daniele Bongetta, Giuseppe Maria Della Pepa, Cesare Zoia, Teresa Somma, Matteo Zoli, Giovanni Raffa, and Grazia Menna

OBJECTIVE

Imposter syndrome (IS) occurs when high-achieving individuals have a pervasive sense of self-doubt combined with fear of being exposed as a fraud, despite objective measures of success. This is one of the main causes of burnout among professionals, threatening their mental health and general well-being. The prevalence and severity of IS among neurosurgery residents and young neurosurgeons has not been yet studied. The primary outcomes of this study were the prevalence and severity of IS.

METHODS

An anonymous cross-sectional survey including both a demographic questionnaire (Clance Imposter Phenomenon Survey) and compensatory mechanisms was distributed to young neurosurgeons and residents in neurosurgery in Italy.

RESULTS

A total of 103 responses were collected. The prevalence rate was 81.6%. Among the respondents with IS, 42.7% showed moderate signs, 27.2% frequent, and only 11.7% had an intense symptomatology. Level of education, female sex, and academic achievements were all identified as predictive factors of IS.

CONCLUSIONS

A total of 81.6% of respondents reported potentially significant levels. The implications of IS on both the outcomes in patients and the well-being of neurosurgeons should be evaluated in future studies.

Full access

Daniele Bongetta, Cesare Zoia, Fabio Pagella, and Paolo Gaetani

Restricted access

Domenico Solari, Elena d’Avella, Gianluca Agresta, Domenico Catapano, Aurelio D’Ecclesia, Davide Locatelli, Luca Massimi, Diego Mazzatenta, Giannantonio Spena, Gianpiero Tamburrini, Cesare Zoia, Matteo Zoli, Giuseppe Cinalli, Paolo Cappabianca, and Luigi Maria Cavallo

OBJECTIVE

Infradiaphragmatic craniopharyngiomas (ICs) represent a distinct subtype, harboring a sellar-suprasellar origin and generally growing in the extra-arachnoidal space contained by the diaphragma sellae. They have been considered ideal for surgical removal through the transsphenoidal approach since the 1960s. The authors present a multicentric national study, intending to selectively analyze IC behavior and the impact of the transsphenoidal endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) on surgical outcomes.

METHODS

Craniopharyngiomas that were intraoperatively recognized as infradiaphragmatic and removed with standard EEA between 2000 and 2021 at 6 Italian neurosurgical departments were included in the study. Clinical, radiological, and surgical findings and outcomes were evaluated and reviewed.

RESULTS

In total, 84 patients were included, with 45.23% identified as pediatric cases and 39.28% as having recurrent tumors. The most common presenting symptoms were endocrine (75%), visual (59.52%), and hypothalamic (26.19%) disorders. ICs were classified as extending below (6 intrasellar and 41 occupying the suprasellar cistern) or above (26 obliterating the anterior recesses of the third ventricle and 11 extending up to the foramina of Monro) the chiasmatic cistern. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 54 cases (64.28%). Tumor extension above the chiasmatic cistern and calcifications were associated with lower likelihood of GTR. The cumulative rate of postoperative complications was 34.53%, with CSF leak being the most common (14.28%). Endocrine, visual, and hypothalamic functions deteriorated postoperatively in 41/78 patients (52.56%), 5/84 (5.95%), and 14/84 (16.67%), respectively. Twenty-eight patients (33.33%) had recurrence during follow-up (mean 63.51 months), with a mean 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 58%. PFS was greater in patients who achieved GTR than patients with other extent of resection.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the largest series in the literature to describe ICs removed with standard EEA, without the need for additional bone and dural opening over the planum sphenoidale. EEA provides a direct route to ICs, the opportunity to manage lesions extending up to the third ventricle without breaching the diaphragma, and high rates of GTR and satisfactory clinical outcomes. Increased surgical complexity and morbidity should be expected in patients with extensive suprasellar extension and involvement of the surrounding vital neurovascular structures.

Free access

Francesco Doglietto, Marika Vezzoli, Antonio Biroli, Giorgio Saraceno, Luca Zanin, Marta Pertichetti, Stefano Calza, Edoardo Agosti, Jahard Mijail Aliaga Arias, Roberto Assietti, Silvio Bellocchi, Claudio Bernucci, Simona Bistazzoni, Daniele Bongetta, Andrea Fanti, Antonio Fioravanti, Alessandro Fiorindi, Alberto Franzin, Davide Locatelli, Raffaelino Pugliese, Elena Roca, Giovanni Marco Sicuri, Roberto Stefini, Martina Venturini, Oscar Vivaldi, Costanza Zattra, Cesare Zoia, and Marco Maria Fontanella

OBJECTIVE

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many countries into lockdown and has led to the postponement of nonurgent neurosurgical procedures. Although stress has been investigated during this pandemic, there are no reports on anxiety in neurosurgical patients undergoing nonurgent surgical procedures.

METHODS

Neurosurgical patients admitted to hospitals in eastern Lombardy for nonurgent surgery after the lockdown prospectively completed a pre- and postoperative structured questionnaire. Recorded data included demographics, pathology, time on surgical waiting list, anxiety related to COVID-19, primary pathology and surgery, safety perception during hospital admission before and after surgery, and surgical outcomes. Anxiety was measured with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Descriptive statistics were computed on the different variables and data were stratified according to pathology (oncological vs nononcological). Three different models were used to investigate which variables had the greatest impact on anxiety, oncological patients, and safety perception, respectively. Because the variables (Xs) were of a different nature (qualitative and quantitative), mostly asymmetrical, and related to outcome (Y) by nonlinear relationships, a machine learning approach composed of three steps (1, random forest growing; 2, relative variable importance measure; and 3, partial dependence plots) was chosen.

RESULTS

One hundred twenty-three patients from 10 different hospitals were included in the study. None of the patients developed COVID-19 after surgery. State and trait anxiety were reported by 30.3% and 18.9% of patients, respectively. Higher values of state anxiety were documented in oncological compared to nononcological patients (46.7% vs 25%; p = 0.055). Anxiety was strongly associated with worry about primary pathology, surgery, disease worsening, and with stress during waiting time, as expected. Worry about positivity to SARS-CoV-2, however, was the strongest factor associated with anxiety, even though none of the patients were infected. Neuro-oncological disease was associated with state anxiety and with worry about surgery and COVID-19. Increased bed distance and availability of hand sanitizer were associated with a feeling of safety.

CONCLUSIONS

These data underline the importance of psychological support, especially for neuro-oncological patients, during a pandemic.