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Michael A. Vogelbaum, Cathy Brewer, Gene H. Barnett, Alireza M. Mohammadi, David M. Peereboom, Manmeet S. Ahluwalia and Shenqiang Gao

OBJECTIVE

Progress in management of high-grade gliomas (HGGs) has been hampered by poor access of potential therapeutics to the CNS. The Cleveland Multiport Catheter (CMC), which deploys 4 independent delivery microcatheters, was developed to be a reliable, high-volume delivery device for delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain and other solid organs. The authors undertook this first-in-human clinical trial effort to evaluate the delivery characteristics of the CMC in patients with HGGs.

METHODS

A series of pilot studies were launched after approval of a sponsor-investigator IND (investigational new drug) application to evaluate the delivery of topotecan and gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) via the CMC in patients with recurrent HGG. The first pilot trial evaluated delivery into enhancing tumor and nonenhancing, tumor-infiltrated brain. Two catheters were placed with the use of a conventional frameless stereotactic technique following a biopsy to confirm tumor recurrence, and drug infusion was performed both intraoperatively and postoperatively for a total of 96 hours with the same rate for all microcatheters. Delivery was assessed by intermittent MRI.

RESULTS

Three patients were enrolled in the first pilot study. MRI demonstrated delivery from all 6 catheters (24 microcatheters). The volume of distribution (Vd) of Gd-DTPA was heavily dependent upon CMC location (enhancing vs nonenhancing) with an approximately 10-fold difference in Vd observed (p = 0.005). There were no hemorrhages related to catheter placement or removal, and all 3 patients completed the protocol-defined treatment.

CONCLUSIONS

The CMC is capable of providing backflow-resistant drug delivery to the brain and brain tumors. The volume of distribution is heavily dependent upon the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Assessment of delivery is essential for development of loco-regionally applied therapeutics in the CNS.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT02278510 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Michael A. Vogelbaum, Cathy Brewer, Gene H. Barnett, Alireza M. Mohammadi, David M. Peereboom, Manmeet S. Ahluwalia and Shenqiang Gao

OBJECTIVE

Progress in management of high-grade gliomas (HGGs) has been hampered by poor access of potential therapeutics to the CNS. The Cleveland Multiport Catheter (CMC), which deploys 4 independent delivery microcatheters, was developed to be a reliable, high-volume delivery device for delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain and other solid organs. The authors undertook this first-in-human clinical trial effort to evaluate the delivery characteristics of the CMC in patients with HGGs.

METHODS

A series of pilot studies were launched after approval of a sponsor-investigator IND (investigational new drug) application to evaluate the delivery of topotecan and gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) via the CMC in patients with recurrent HGG. The first pilot trial evaluated delivery into enhancing tumor and nonenhancing, tumor-infiltrated brain. Two catheters were placed with the use of a conventional frameless stereotactic technique following a biopsy to confirm tumor recurrence, and drug infusion was performed both intraoperatively and postoperatively for a total of 96 hours with the same rate for all microcatheters. Delivery was assessed by intermittent MRI.

RESULTS

Three patients were enrolled in the first pilot study. MRI demonstrated delivery from all 6 catheters (24 microcatheters). The volume of distribution (Vd) of Gd-DTPA was heavily dependent upon CMC location (enhancing vs nonenhancing) with an approximately 10-fold difference in Vd observed (p = 0.005). There were no hemorrhages related to catheter placement or removal, and all 3 patients completed the protocol-defined treatment.

CONCLUSIONS

The CMC is capable of providing backflow-resistant drug delivery to the brain and brain tumors. The volume of distribution is heavily dependent upon the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Assessment of delivery is essential for development of loco-regionally applied therapeutics in the CNS.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT02278510 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Andrew E. Sloan, Manmeet S. Ahluwalia, Jose Valerio-Pascua, Sunil Manjila, Mark G. Torchia, Stephen E. Jones, Jeffrey L. Sunshine, Michael Phillips, Mark A. Griswold, Mark Clampitt, Cathy Brewer, Jennifer Jochum, Mary V. McGraw, Dawn Diorio, Gail Ditz and Gene H. Barnett

Object

Laser interstitial thermal therapy has been used as an ablative treatment for glioma; however, its development was limited due to technical issues. The NeuroBlate System incorporates several technological advances to overcome these drawbacks. The authors report a Phase I, thermal dose–escalation trial assessing the safety and efficacy of NeuroBlate in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (rGBM).

Methods

Adults with suspected supratentorial rGBM of 15- to 40-mm dimension and a Karnofsky Performance Status score of ≥ 60 were eligible. After confirmatory biopsy, treatment was delivered using a rigid, gas-cooled, side-firing laser probe. Treatment was monitored using real-time MRI thermometry, and proprietary software providing predictive thermal damage feedback was used by the surgeon, along with control of probe rotation and depth, to tailor tissue coagulation. An external data safety monitoring board determined if toxicity at lower levels justified dose escalation.

Results

Ten patients were treated at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center (Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals–Case Medical Center). Their average age was 55 years (range 34–69 years) and the median preoperative Karnofsky Performance Status score was 80 (range 70–90). The mean tumor volume was 6.8 ± 5 cm3 (range 2.6–19 cm3), the percentage of tumor treated was 78% ± 12% (range 57%–90%), and the conformality index was 1.21 ± 0.33 (range 1.00–2.04). Treatment-related necrosis was evident on MRI studies at 24 and 48 hours. The median survival was 316 days (range 62–767 days). Three patients improved neurologically, 6 remained stable, and 1 worsened. Steroid-responsive treatment-related edema occurred in all patients but one. Three had Grade 3 adverse events at the highest dose.

Conclusions

NeuroBlate represents new technology for delivering laser interstitial thermal therapy, allowing controlled thermal ablation of deep hemispheric rGBM. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00747253 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

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J. Bradley Elder and E. Antonio Chiocca