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  • Author or Editor: Caterina Michelozzi x
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Caterina Michelozzi, Jean Darcourt, Adrien Guenego, Anne-Christine Januel, Philippe Tall, Matthias Gawlitza, Fabrice Bonneville and Christophe Cognard

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study is to present the authors’ medium-term results, with special emphasis on complications, occlusion rate of the aneurysm sac (digital subtraction angiography [DSA] and MRI), and the fate of cortical branches and perforating arteries covered (“jailed”) by the flow diverter (FD) stent.

METHODS

Between January 2010 and September 2017, 29 patients (14 female) with 30 aneurysms were treated with an FD stent. Twenty-one aneurysms were at the middle cerebral artery bifurcation, 8 were in the anterior communicating artery region, and 1 was a pericallosal artery bifurcation. Thirty-five cortical branches were covered. A single FD stent was used in all patients. Symptomatic and asymptomatic periprocedural and delayed complications were reported. DSA and MRI controls were analyzed to evaluate modification of the aneurysm sac and jailed branches.

RESULTS

Permanent morbidity was 3.4% (1/29), due to a jailed branch occlusion, with a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 2 at the last follow-up. Mortality and permanent complication with poor prognosis (mRS score > 2) rates were 0%. The mean follow-up time for DSA and MRI (mean ± SD) was 21 ± 14.5 months (range 3–66 months) and 19 ± 16 months (range 3–41 months), respectively. The mean time to aneurysm sac occlusion (available for 24 patients), including stable remodeling, was 11.8 ± 6 months (median 13, range 3–27 months). The overall occlusion rate was 82.1% (23/28), and it was 91.7% (22/24) in the group of patients with at least 2 DSA control sequences. One recanalization occurred at 41 months posttreatment. At the time of publication, at the latest follow-up, 7 (20%) of 35 covered branches were occluded, 18 (51.4%) showed a decreased caliber, and the remaining 10 (28.5%) were unchanged. MRI T2-weighted sequences showed complete sac reabsorption in 7/29 aneurysms (24.1%), and the remaining lesions were either smaller (55.2%) or unchanged (17.2%). MRI revealed asymptomatic and symptomatic ischemic events in perforator territories in 7/28 (25%) and 4/28 (14.3%) patients, respectively, which were reversible within 24 hours.

CONCLUSIONS

Flow diversion of bifurcation aneurysms is feasible, with low rates of permanent morbidity and mortality and high occlusion rates; however, recurrence may occur. Caliber reduction and asymptomatic occlusion of covered cortical branches as well as silent perforator stroke are common. Ischemic complications may occur with no identified predictable factors. MRI controls should be required in all patients to evaluate silent ischemic lesions and aneurysm sac reabsorption over time.

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Christoph J. Griessenauer, Christopher S. Ogilvy, Nimer Adeeb, Adam A. Dmytriw, Paul M. Foreman, Hussain Shallwani, Nicola Limbucci, Salvatore Mangiafico, Ashish Kumar, Caterina Michelozzi, Timo Krings, Vitor Mendes Pereira, Charles C. Matouk, Mark R. Harrigan, Hakeem J. Shakir, Adnan H. Siddiqui, Elad I. Levy, Leonardo Renieri, Thomas R. Marotta, Christophe Cognard and Ajith J. Thomas

OBJECTIVE

Flow diversion for posterior circulation aneurysms performed using the Pipeline embolization device (PED) constitutes an increasingly common off-label use for otherwise untreatable aneurysms. The safety and efficacy of this treatment modality has not been assessed in a multicenter study.

METHODS

A retrospective review of prospectively maintained databases at 8 academic institutions was performed for the years 2009 to 2016 to identify patients with posterior circulation aneurysms treated with PED placement.

RESULTS

A total of 129 consecutive patients underwent 129 procedures to treat 131 aneurysms; 29 dissecting, 53 fusiform, and 49 saccular lesions were included. At a median follow-up of 11 months, complete and near-complete occlusion was recorded in 78.1%. Dissecting aneurysms had the highest occlusion rate and fusiform the lowest. Major complications were most frequent in fusiform aneurysms, whereas minor complications occurred most commonly in saccular aneurysms. In patients with saccular aneurysms, clopidogrel responders had a lower complication rate than did clopidogrel nonresponders. The majority of dissecting aneurysms were treated in the immediate or acute phase following subarachnoid hemorrhage, a circumstance that contributed to the highest mortality rate in those aneurysms.

CONCLUSIONS

In the largest series to date, fusiform aneurysms were found to have the lowest occlusion rate and the highest frequency of major complications. Dissecting aneurysms, frequently treated in the setting of subarachnoid hemorrhage, occluded most often and had a low complication rate. Saccular aneurysms were associated with predominantly minor complications, particularly in clopidogrel nonresponders.