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  • Author or Editor: Burton M. Onofrio x
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Radiofrequency percutaneous Gasserian ganglion lesions

Results in 140 patients with trigeminal pain

Burton M. Onofrio

✓ Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of the Gasserian ganglion or posterior root, or both, was performed in 140 patients. Of the 135 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, satisfactory analgesia was achieved in 121. Postoperative complications included unintentional first-division analgesia (10), transient sixth-nerve palsy (1), neuroparalytic keratitis (2), and anesthesia dolorosa (2). The phenomenon of facial blush may be helpful in avoiding unwanted first-division analgesia. In four of five patients with other forms of neuralgia, the procedure did not relieve pain; the fifth patient experienced significant relief from pain due to carcinoma of the mandible.

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Injection of chymopapain into intervertebral discs

Preliminary report on 72 patients with symptoms of disc disease

Burton M. Onofrio

✓ The author presents an evaluation of 72 patients given intradiscal chymopapain as the treatment for symptoms related to ruptured intervertebral disc. The rationale, criteria for patient selection, risks, and results are described. The author believes that this early follow-up suggests that chymopapain may have a place in the treatment of symptomatic disc protrusions and extrusions.

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Mark W. Fox and Burton M. Onofrio

✓ Fifty-nine cases of vertebral hemangioma were seen at the Mayo Clinic between 1980 and 1990. Vertebral hemangiomas were discovered incidentally in 35 patients, while pain was the presenting complaint in 13 patients. Five patients presented directly with progressive neurological deficit requiring surgery, and six patients had surgery elsewhere for spinal cord compression and were referred for follow-up evaluation. To better define the natural history of these lesions, a historical review of these patients was conducted; progression of an asymptomatic or painful lesion to neurological symptoms was found in only two cases (mean follow-up period 7.4 years, range 1 to 35 years). New-onset back pain followed by subacute progression (mean time to progression 4.4 months, range 0.25 to 12 months) of a thoracic myelopathy was the most common presentation for patients with neurological deficit. Initially, all 11 patients with spinal cord compression underwent decompressive surgery with full neurological recovery. Recurrent neurological symptoms were observed in three of six patients following subtotal tumor resection and postoperative administration of 1000 cGy or less radiation therapy (mean follow-up period 8.7 years, range 1 to 17 years). No recurrences were noted in four patients who had subtotal excision plus radiotherapy between 2600 and 4500 cGy. One other patient had gross total tumor removal without radiotherapy and has not had a recurrence.

Based on these patients and a review of the literature, the authors recommend annual neurological and radiological examinations for patients with hemangiomas associated with pain, especially young females with thoracic lesions in whom spinal cord compression is most likely to develop. Radiation therapy or embolization is an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with severe medically refractory pain. Regular follow-up monitoring for patients with asymptomatic lesions is unnecessary unless pain develops at the appropriate spinal level. It is concluded that management of patients with a progressive neurological deficit should include preoperative angiography and embolization, decompressive surgery with the approach determined by the degree of vertebral involvement and site of spinal cord compression, and postoperative radiation therapy in patients following subtotal tumor removal. Operative management and complications are discussed.

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Malcolm Shupeck and Burton M. Onofrio

✓ In an effort to increase the beneficial results from decompressive surgery for suprascapular nerve entrapment, an anterior approach has been developed which minimizes manipulation of the suprascapular nerve and maximizes visualization while the decompression is being carried out. The technique and results in three patients are described.

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Mark W. Fox and Burton M. Onofrio

Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis is a common condition affecting middle-aged and elderly people. Significant controversy exists concerning the appropriate indications for fusion following decompressive surgery. The purpose of this report is to compare the clinical outcomes of patients who were and were not treated with fusion following decompressive laminectomy for spinal stenosis and to identify whether fusion was beneficial. The authors conclude that patients in whom concomitant fusion procedures were performed fared better than patients who were treated by means of decompression alone when evidence of radiological instability existed preoperatively.

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Burton M. Onofrio and Hernan K. Campa

✓ This paper evaluates 286 Mayo Clinic patients who had dorsal rhizotomies for pain. For purposes of analysis the patients were divided according to the origin of the pain. The group with pain of unknown etiology had the highest success rate (25% to 50%), but the overall long-term results were discouraging. Many groups had no success. Diagnostic blocks were almost always unsuccessful and proved to be a very unreliable prognostic indication of the result to be expected from section of the same roots.

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Ronald Reimer and Burton M. Onofrio

✓ The authors review 32 cases of spinal cord astrocytoma in patients under 20 years of age who were treated at the Mayo Clinic between 1955 and 1980. There was a 1.3:1 male to female ratio. Twenty patients were between 6 and 15 years of age at the time of diagnosis. The duration of symptoms prior to definitive diagnosis varied from 5 days to 9 years, with an average of 24 months. The most common symptoms were pain (62.5%), gait disturbance (43.7%), numbness (18.8%), and sphincteric dysfunction (18.8%). The most common neurological findings were a Babinski response (50.0%), posterior column sensory dysfunction (40.6%), and paraparesis (37.5%). A median follow-up period of 8.6 years (range 0.8 to 25.5 years) revealed that the survival time diminished with increased histological grade of the astrocytoma (p < 0.001).

The development of postlaminectomy spinal deformities represented a serious postoperative complication. This occurred in 13 patients and was first recognized between 8 and 90 months postoperatively. Six deformities occurred following cervical laminectomy, and eight patients required at least one orthopedic procedure. It is crucial to follow these patients for an extended period of time to watch for postoperative spinal deformities.

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The long-term results of chymopapain chemonucleolysis for lumbar disc disease

Ten-year follow-up results in 268 patients injected at the Mayo Clinic

Robert J. Maciunas and Burton M. Onofrio

✓ The long-term clinical outcome is evaluated for 268 patients after chymopapain chemonucleolysis for radicular complaints referrable to documented intervertebral disc disease. The follow-up period for 92% of these patients was 10 years. No complications due to chymopapain toxicity were observed; 80.1% of patients were relieved of their presenting radicular leg pain and 75.1% were employed at a capacity equal to or more strenuous than before injection. Chemonucleolysis was demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment modality, with long-term results that compare favorably with those of similarly selected patients undergoing open surgical procedures. In the patients whose chymopapain therapy failed, the outcome of subsequent open surgical procedures was not necessarily compromised by prior chemonucleolysis. A higher rate of failure and subsequent surgical intervention was seen in those patients with injections performed soon after an unsuccessful open procedure on the same side and at the same interspace, those with workmen's compensation or litigation pending, those with a history of work-related injury, those whose employment involved heavy manual labor or extensive driving, and those whose preinjection spine x-ray films indicated retrograde spondylolisthesis.