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Walavan Sivakumar, J. Bradley Elder and Mark H. Bilsky

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a common neurosurgical procedure, and the benefits, long-term outcomes, and complications are well described in the literature. The development of a juxtafacet joint cyst resulting in radiculopathy is a rare outcome after ACDF and merits further description. The authors describe a patient in whom a juxtafacet joint cyst developed after ACDF procedures, resulting in surgical intervention. When a juxtafacet joint cyst develops after ACDF, symptoms can include radiculopathy, neck pain, and neurological symptoms such as paresthesias and motor weakness. The presence of a juxtafacet joint cyst implies instability in that region of the spine. Patients with this pathological entity may require decompression of neural elements and fusion across the segment involved with the cyst.

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Ahmed Mohyeldin, Russell R. Lonser and J. Bradley Elder

OBJECT

The object of this study was to assess the feasibility, accuracy, and safety of real-time MRI-compatible frameless stereotactic brain biopsy.

METHODS

Clinical, imaging, and histological data in consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic brain biopsy using a frameless real-time MRI system were analyzed.

RESULTS

Five consecutive patients (4 males, 1 female) were included in this study. The mean age at biopsy was 45.8 years (range 29–60 years). Real-time MRI permitted concurrent display of the biopsy cannula trajectory and tip during placement at the target. The mean target depth of biopsied lesions was 71.3 mm (range 60.4–80.4 mm). Targeting accuracy analysis revealed a mean radial error of 1.3 ± 1.1 mm (mean ± standard deviation), mean depth error of 0.7 ± 0.3 mm, and a mean absolute tip error of 1.5 ± 1.1 mm. There was no correlation between target depth and absolute tip error (Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, r = 0.22). All biopsy cannulae were placed at the target with a single penetration and resulted in a diagnostic specimen in all cases. Histopathological evaluation of biopsy samples revealed dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (1 case), breast carcinoma (1 case), and glioblastoma multiforme (3 cases).

CONCLUSIONS

The ability to place a biopsy cannula under real-time imaging guidance permits on-the-fly alterations in the cannula trajectory and/or tip placement. Real-time imaging during MRI-guided brain biopsy provides precise safe targeting of brain lesions.

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Christopher S. Hong, Daniel M. Prevedello and J. Bradley Elder

OBJECT

Tubular brain retractors may improve access to deep-seated brain lesions while potentially reducing the risks of collateral neurological injury associated with standard microsurgical approaches. Here, microscope-assisted resection of lesions using tubular retractors is assessed to determine if it is superior to endoscope-assisted surgery due to the technological advancements associated with modern tubular ports and surgical microscopes.

METHODS

Following institutional approval of the tubular port, data obtained from the initial 20 patients to undergo transportal resection of deep-seated brain lesions were analyzed in this study. The pathological entities of the resected tissues included metastatic tumors (8 patients), glioma (7), meningioma (1), neurocytoma (1), radiation necrosis (1), primitive neuroectodermal tumor (1), and hemangioblastoma (1). Surgery incorporated endoscopic (5 patients) or microscopic (15) assistance. The locations included the basal ganglia (11 patients), cerebellum (4), frontal lobe (2), temporal lobe (2), and parietal lobe (1). Cases were reviewed for neurological outcomes, extent of resection (EOR), and complications. Technical data for the port, surgical microscope, and endoscope were analyzed.

RESULTS

EOR was considered total in 14 (70%), near total (> 95%) in 4 (20%), and subtotal (< 90%) in 2 (10%) of 20 patients. Incomplete resection was associated with the basal ganglia location (p < 0.05) and use of the endoscope (p < 0.002). Four of 5 (80%) endoscope-assisted cases were near-total (2) or subtotal (2) resection. Histopathological diagnosis, presenting neurological symptoms, and demographics were not associated with EOR. Complication rates were low and similar between groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Initial experience with tubular retractors favors use of the microscope rather than the endoscope due to a wider and 3D field of view. Improved microscope optics and tubular retractor design allows for binocular vision with improved lighting for the resection of deep-seated brain lesions.

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J. Bradley Elder and E. Antonio Chiocca

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J. Bradley Elder and E. Antonio Chiocca

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J. Bradley Elder and E. Antonio Chiocca

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Kristin Huntoon, Tianxia Wu, J. Bradley Elder, John A. Butman, Emily Y. Chew, W. Marston Linehan, Edward H. Oldfield and Russell R. Lonser

OBJECT

Peritumoral cysts are frequently associated with CNS hemangioblastomas and often underlie neurological morbidity and mortality. To determine their natural history and clinical impact, the authors prospectively analyzed hemangioblastoma-associated peritumoral cysts in patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease.

METHODS

Patients with VHL disease who had 2 or more years of follow-up and who were enrolled in a prospective study at the National Institutes of Health were included. Serial prospectively acquired laboratory, genetic, imaging, and clinical data were analyzed.

RESULTS

One hundred thirty-two patients (of 225 in the VHL study with at least 2 years of follow-up) had peritumoral cysts that were followed for more than 2 years (total of 292 CNS peritumoral cysts). The mean age at study entrance was 37.4 ± 13.1 years ([mean ± SD], median 37.9, range 12.3–65.1 years). The mean follow-up was 7.0 ± 1.7 years (median 7.3, range 2.1–9.0 years). Over the study period, 121 of the 292 peritumoral cysts (41.4%) became symptomatic. Development of new cysts was associated with a larger number cysts at study enrollment (p = 0.002) and younger age (p < 0.0001). Cyst growth rate was associated with anatomical location (cerebellum cysts grew faster than spine and brainstem cysts; p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0008), younger age (< 35 years of age; p = 0.0006), and development of new neurological symptoms (p < 0.0001). Cyst size at symptom production depended on anatomical location (p < 0.0001; largest to smallest were found, successively, in the cerebellum, spinal cord, and brainstem). The most common location for peritumoral cysts was the cerebellum (184 cysts [63%]; p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Peritumoral cysts frequently underlie symptom formation that requires surgical intervention in patients with VHL disease. Development of new cysts was associated with a larger number of cysts at study enrollment and younger age. Total peritumoral cyst burden was associated with germline partial deletion of the VHL gene.

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Jaime Vengoechea, Andrew E. Sloan, Yanwen Chen, Xiaowei Guan, Quinn T. Ostrom, Amber Kerstetter, Devan Capella, Mark L. Cohen, Yingli Wolinsky, Karen Devine, Warren Selman, Gene H. Barnett, Ronald E. Warnick, Christopher McPherson, E. Antonio Chiocca, J. Bradley Elder and Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan

Object

Although most meningiomas are benign, about 20% are atypical (Grade II or III) and have increased mortality and morbidity. Identifying tumors with greater malignant potential can have significant clinical value. This validated genome-wide methylation study comparing Grade I with Grade II and III meningiomas aims to discover genes that are aberrantly methylated in atypical meningiomas.

Methods

Patients with newly diagnosed meningioma were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study. The Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip (Illumina, Inc.) was used to interrogate 27,578 CpG sites in 14,000 genes per sample for a discovery set of 33 samples (3 atypical). To verify the results, the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Illumina, Inc.) was used to interrogate 450,000 cytosines at CpG loci throughout the genome for a verification set containing 7 replicates (3 atypical), as well as 12 independent samples (6 atypical). A nonparametric Wilcoxon exact test was used to test for difference in methylation between benign and atypical meningiomas in both sets. Heat maps were generated for each set. Methylation results were validated for the 2 probes with the largest difference in methylation intensity by performing Western blot analysis on a set of 20 (10 atypical) samples, including 11 replicates.

Results

The discovery array identified 95 probes with differential methylation between benign and atypical meningiomas, creating 2 distinguishable groups corresponding to tumor grade when visually examined on a heat map. The validation array evaluated 87 different probes and showed that 9 probes were differentially methylated. On heat map examination the results of this array also suggested the existence of 2 major groups that corresponded to histological grade. IGF2BP1 and PDCD1, 2 proteins that can increase the malignant potential of tumors, were the 2 probes with the largest difference in intensity, and for both of these the atypical meningiomas had a decreased median production of protein, though this was not statistically significant (p = 0.970 for IGF2BP1 and p = 1 for PDCD1).

Conclusions

A genome-wide methylation analysis of benign and atypical meningiomas identified 9 genes that were reliably differentially methylated, with the strongest difference in IGF2BP1 and PDCD1. The mechanism why increased methylation of these sites is associated with an aggressive phenotype is not evident. Future research may investigate this mechanism, as well as the utility of IGF2BP1 as a marker for pathogenicity in otherwise benign-appearing meningiomas.

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J. Bradley Elder and E. Antonio Chiocca