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Bo Wu, Hong Zhu, Weidong Liu and Longyi Chen

Radiation-induced cranial fasciitis is a rare complication of radiotherapy, especially in an intradiploic location. The authors report such a case of cranial fasciitis in a 13-year-old girl previously subjected to cranial radiotherapy for a recurrent cerebellar medulloblastoma. The patient had undergone a gross-total removal of a medulloblastoma followed by no radiation therapy at the age of 10 years. The tumor recurred at the original site 2 years later, warranting a repeat operation with a gross-total tumor removal and subsequent radiation therapy. The follow-up MRI sequence demonstrated no abnormal appearance for 1 year, until a new enhancing mass was found within the occipital bone adjacent to the prior bone window. Following its resection, the new lesion was histologically identified as cranial fasciitis. Differential diagnosis of a well-circumscribed bone lesion should include cranial fasciitis, especially in young children with radiotherapy for a previous intracranial malignancy. Radiotherapy should be considered among the inciting factors in the development of cranial fasciitis. The osteolytic lesions of cranial fasciitis, although nontumoral and self-limited in duration, should be eligible candidates for early, total resection to avoid potential intracranial expansion.

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Emad Eskandar

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Bo Xiao, Fang-Fang Wu, Hong Zhang and Yan-Bin Ma

Object

When treating patients with a spontaneous supratentorial massive (≥ 70 ml) intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the results of surgery are gloomy. A worsening pupil response has been observed in patients preoperatively, despite blood pressure control and diuretic administration. Because open surgery needs time for decompression to occur, the authors conducted a prospective randomized study to determine whether patients who have suffered a massive ICH can benefit from a more urgently performed decompressive procedure.

Methods

Overall, 36 eligible patients admitted 6 or fewer hours post-ictus were enrolled in the study. In Group A, 12 patients underwent CT-based hematoma puncture and partial aspiration in the emergency department (ED) and subsequent evacuation via a craniectomy; in Group B, 24 patients underwent hematoma evacuation via a craniectomy only. Pupil responses were categorized into 5 grades (Grade 0, bilaterally fixed; Grade 1, unilaterally fixed with the fixed pupil > 7 mm; Grade 2, unilaterally fixed with the fixed pupil ≤ 7 mm; Grade 3, a unilaterally sluggish response; and Grade 4, a bilaterally brisk response). Grades were obtained on admission, at surgical decompression (defined as the point at which liquid hematoma began to flow out in Group A and at dural opening in Group B), and at completion of craniectomy. The Barthel Scale was used to assess survivors' functional outcome at 12 months. Comparisons were made between Groups A and B. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the positive likelihood ratio of all variables for survival and function (Barthel Scale score of ≥ 35 at 12 months).

Results

Decompressive surgery was undertaken approximately 60 minutes earlier in Group A than B. A worsening pupil reflex before decompression was observed in no Group A patient and in 9 Group B patients. At the time of decompression pupil response was better in Group A than B (p < 0.05). Although only approximately one-third of the hematoma volume documented on initial CT scanning had been drained before the craniectomy in Group A, when partial aspiration was followed by craniectomy, better pupil-response results were obtained in Group A at the completion of craniectomy, and survival rate and 12-month Barthel Scale score were better as well (p < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that one variable, a minimum pupil grade of 3 at the time of decompression, had the highest predictive value for survival at 12 months (8.0, 95% CI 2.0–32.0), and a pupil grade of 4 at the same time was the most valuable predictor of a Barthel Scale score of 35 or greater at 12 months (15.0, 95% CI 1.9–120.9).

Conclusions

Patients with massive spontaneous supratentorial ICHs may benefit from more urgent surgical decompression. The results of logistic regression analysis implied that, to improve long-term functional outcome, decompression should be performed in patients before herniation occurs. Due to the fact that most of these patients have signs of herniation when presenting to the ED and because conventional surgical decompression requires time to take effect, this combination of surgical treatment provides a feasible and effective surgical option.

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Hong Bo Sim, Judith A. Murovic, Bo Young Cho, T. Jesse Lim and Jon Park

Object

Both posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) have been frequently undertaken for lumbar arthrodesis. These procedures use different approaches and cage designs, each of which could affect spine stability, even after the addition of posterior pedicle screw fixation. The objectives of this biomechanical study were to compare PLIF and TLIF, each accompanied by bilateral pedicle screw fixation, with regard to the stability of the fused and adjacent segments.

Methods

Fourteen human L2–S2 cadaveric spine specimens were tested for 6 different modes of motion: flexion, extension, right and left lateral bending, and right and left axial rotation using a load control protocol (LCP). The LCP for each mode of motion utilized moments up to 8.0 Nm at a rate of 0.5 Nm/second with the application of a constant compression follower preload of 400 N. All 14 specimens were tested in the intact state. The specimens were then divided equally into PLIF and TLIF conditions. In the PLIF Group, a bilateral L4–5 partial facetectomy was followed by discectomy and a single-level fusion procedure. In the TLIF Group, a unilateral L4–5 complete facetectomy was performed (and followed by the discectomy and single-level fusion procedure). In the TLIF Group, the implants were initially positioned inside the disc space posteriorly (TLIF-P) and the specimens were tested; the implants were then positioned anteriorly (TLIF-A) and the specimens were retested. All specimens were evaluated at the reconstructed and adjacent segments for range of motion (ROM) and at the adjacent segments for intradiscal pressure (IDP), and laminar strain.

Results

At the reconstructed segment, both the PLIF and the TLIF specimens had significantly lower ROMs compared with those for the intact state (p < 0.05). For lateral bending, the PLIF resulted in a marked decrease in ROM that was statistically significantly greater than that found after TLIF (p < 0.05). In flexion-extension and rotation, the PLIF Group also had less ROM, however, unlike the difference in lateral bending ROM, these differences in ROM values were not statistically significant. Variations in the position of the implants within the disc space were not associated with any significant differences in ROM values (p = 0.43). Analyses of ROM at the adjacent levels L2–3, L3–4, and L5–S1 showed that ROM was increased to some degree in all directions. When compared with that of intact specimens, the ROMs were increased to a statistically significant degree at all adjacent segments in flexion-extension loads (p < 0.05); however, the differences in values among the various operative procedures were not statistically significant. The IDP and facet contact force for the adjacent L3–4 and L5–S1 levels were also increased, but these values were not statistically significantly increased from those for the intact spine (p > 0.05).

Conclusions

Regarding stability, PLIF provides a higher immediate stability compared with that of TLIF, especially in lateral bending. Based on our findings, however, PLIF and TLIF, each with posterolateral fusions, have similar biomechanical properties regarding ROM, IDP, and laminar strain at the adjacent segments.

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Tianyi Qian, Wenjing Zhou, Zhipei Ling, Shangkai Gao, Hesheng Liu and Bo Hong

Object

Electrocorticography (ECoG) is a powerful tool for presurgical functional mapping. Power increase in the high gamma band has been observed from ECoG electrodes on the surface of the sensory motor cortex during the execution of body movements. In this study the authors aim to validate the clinical usage of high gamma activity in presurgical mapping by comparing ECoG mapping with traditional direct electrical cortical stimulation (ECS) and functional MRI (fMRI) mapping.

Methods

Seventeen patients with epilepsy participated in an ECoG motor mapping experiment. The patients executed a 5-minute hand/tongue movement task while the ECoG signal was recorded. All 17 patients also underwent extraoperative ECS mapping to localize the motor cortex. Eight patients also participated in a presurgical fMRI study. The high gamma activity on ECoG was modeled using the general linear model (GLM), and the regions showing significant gamma power increase during the task condition compared with the rest condition were localized. The maps derived from GLM-based ECoG mapping, ECS, and fMRI were then compared.

Results

High gamma activity in the motor cortex can be reliably modulated by motor tasks. Localization of the motor regions achieved with GLM-based ECoG mapping was consistent with the localization determined by ECS. The maps also appeared to be highly localized compared with the fMRI activations. Using the ECS findings as the reference, GLM-based ECoG mapping showed a significantly higher sensitivity than fMRI (66.7% for ECoG, 52.6% for fMRI, p < 0.05), while the specificity was high for both techniques (> 97%). If the current-spreading effect in ECS is accounted for, ECoG mapping may produce maps almost identical to those produced by ECS mapping (100% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity).

Conclusions

General linear model–based ECoG mapping showed a superior performance compared to traditional ECS and fMRI mapping in terms of efficiency and accuracy. Using this method, motor functions can be reliably mapped in less than 5 minutes.

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Shu-Guang Gao, Guang-Hua Lei, Hong-Bo He, Hua Liu, Wen-Feng Xiao, Ting Wen, Jie-Yu Liang and Kang-Hua Li

Object

With the increasing advocacy for total disc replacement (TDR) as a potential alternative to fusion in the management of lumbar degenerative disc disease, intradiscal pressures (IDPs) and facet joint stresses at the adjacent levels of spine have generated considerable interest. The purpose of this study was to compare adjacent-level IDPs and facet joint stresses among TDR, discectomy, and fusion.

Methods

Ten fresh human cadaveric lumbar specimens (L2–S1) were subjected to an unconstrained load in axial torsion, lateral bending, flexion, and extension by using multidirectional flexibility test. Four surgical treatment modes—control (disc intact), discectomy, TDR, and fusion—were tested in sequential order at L4–5. During testing, the IDPs and facet forces following each treatment were calculated at the adjacent vertebral levels (L3–4 and L5–S1).

Results

Intradiscal pressures and facet force pressures were similar between the intact condition and the TDR reconstruction at the L3–4 and L5–S1 levels under all loading conditions (p > 0.05). Compared with the intact and TDR groups, the discectomy and fusion groups had higher IDPs at the L3–4 and L5–S1 levels under all loading conditions (p < 0.05). No significant difference in the facet force pressure was noted among the intact, discectomy, and TDR groups at the L3–4 and L5–S1 levels under any loading conditions (p > 0.05). However, the facet force pressure produced for fusion was significantly higher than the mean values obtained for the intact, discectomy, and TDR groups at the L3–4 and L5–S1 levels under all loading conditions (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Lumbar TDR maintained adjacent-level IDPs and facet force pressures near the values for intact spines, whereas adjacent-level IDPs tended to increase after discectomy or fusion and facet forces tended to increase after fusion.

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Bo Wu, Weidong Liu, Hong Zhu, Hailong Feng and Jinping Liu

Gliomas are rare entities in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) in adults. The authors present clinical, neuroradiological, serological, and neuropathological findings in a 60-year-old man with an extraaxial CPA glioblastoma arising from the proximal portion of cranial nerve VIII. The patient presented with progressive left-sided deafness and left-sided facial palsy lasting less than 2 months and progressive dysarthria and dysphagia lasting 2 weeks. Preoperative neuroimaging suggested the diagnosis of CPA meningioma with “dural-tail” sign and involvement of the internal auditory canal. Serological examination showed an increase in the malignant markers of ferritin and neuron-specific enolase, which suggested underlying malignancy. The tumor was subtotally removed, and it was confirmed to be completely separated from the brainstem and cerebellum. Cranial nerves VII and VIII were destroyed and sacrificed. Transient severe bradycardia occurred during surgery due to entrapment of the caudal cranial nerve complex by the tumor in such an infiltrative way. The neuropathological examination revealed a glioblastoma. The patient underwent no further treatment and died of cachexia 2 months postoperatively. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the first case of a primary glioblastoma in the CPA in an adult. A high index of suspicion along with reliance on clinical assessment, radiological findings, and serum detection of specific malignant markers is essential to diagnose such uncommon CPA lesions.

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Min He, Heng Zhang, Ding Lei, Bo-Yong Mao, Chao You, Xiao-Dong Xie, Hong Sun, Yan Ju and Jia-Ming Zhang

Object

Utilization of covered stent grafts in treating neurovascular disorders has been reported, but their efficacy and safety in vertebral artery (VA) dissecting aneurysms needs further investigation.

Methods

Six cases are presented involving VA dissecting aneurysms that were treated by positioning a covered stent graft. Two aneurysms were located distal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 4 were located proximal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Aspirin as well as ticlopidine or clopidogrel were administered after the procedure to prevent stent-related thrombosis. All patients were followed up both angiographically and clinically.

Results

Five of the 6 patients underwent successful placement of a covered stent graft. The covered stent could not reach the level of the aneurysm in 1 patient with serious vasospasm who died secondary to severe subarachnoid hemorrhage that occurred 3 days later. Patient follow-up ranged from 6 to 14 months (mean 10.4 months), and demonstrated complete stabilization of the obliterated aneurysms, and no obvious intimal hyperplasia. No procedure-related complications such as stenosis or embolization occurred in the 5 patients with successful stent graft placement.

Conclusions

Although long-term follow-up studies using a greater number of patients is required for further validation of this technique, this preliminary assessment shows that covered stent graft placement is an efficient, safe, and microinvasive technique, and is a promising tool in treating intracranial VA dissecting aneurysms.

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Qiao Zuo, Pengfei Yang, Nan Lv, Qinghai Huang, Yu Zhou, Xiaoxi Zhang, Guoli Duan, Yina Wu, Yi Xu, Bo Hong, Rui Zhao, Qiang Li, Yibin Fang, Kaijun Zhao, Dongwei Dai and Jianmin Liu

OBJECTIVE

The authors compared the contemporary perioperative procedure-related complications between coiling with stent placement and coiling without stent placement for acutely ruptured aneurysms treated in a single center after improvement of interventional skills and strategy.

METHODS

In an institutional review board–approved protocol, 133 patients who underwent coiling with stent placement and 289 patients who underwent coiling without stent placement from January 2012 to December 2014 were consecutively reviewed retrospectively. Baseline characteristics, procedure-related complications and mortality rate, angiographic follow-up results, and clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups. Univariate analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the association of procedure-related complications of coiling with stent placement with potential risk factors.

RESULTS

The coiling/stent group and coiling/no-stent group were statistically comparable with respect to all baseline characteristics except for aneurysm location (p < 0.001) and parent artery configuration (p = 0.024). The immediate embolization results and clinical outcomes between the two groups showed no significant differences (p = 0.807 and p = 0.611, respectively). The angiographic follow-up results of the coiling in stent group showed a significant higher occlusion rate and lower recurrence rate compared with the coiling/no-stent group (82.5% vs 66.7%, 3.5% vs 14.5%, p = 0.007). Procedure-related intraoperative rupture and thrombosis, postoperative early rebleeding and thrombosis, and external ventricular drainage–related hemorrhagic event occurred in 3.0% (4 of 133), 2.3% (3 of 133), 1.5% (2 of 133), 0.7% (1 of 133), and 0.8% (1 of 133) of the coiling/stent group compared with 1.0% (3 of 289), 1.4% (4 of 289), 1.4% (4 of 289), and 0.7% (2 of 289) of the coiling/no-stent group, respectively (p = 0.288, p = 0.810, p = 1.000, p = 0.315, and p = 1.000, respectively). One patient presented with coil protrusion in the group of coiling without stent. The procedure-related mortality was 1.5% (2 of 133) in the coiling/stent group and 0.7% in the coiling/no-stent group (p = 0.796). Multivariable analysis showed no significant predictors for the total perioperative procedure-related complications, hemorrhagic complications, or ischemic complications.

CONCLUSIONS

The perioperative procedure-related complications and mortality rate did not differ significantly between the coiling/stent group and the coiling/no-stent group for patients with acutely ruptured aneurysms. Considering the better angiographic follow-up results, coiling with stent placement might be a feasible, safe, and promising option for treatment in the acute phase of selected wide-necked ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

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Zang-Hee Cho, Hoon-Ki Min, Se-Hong Oh, Jae-Yong Han, Chan-Woong Park, Je-Geun Chi, Young-Bo Kim, Sun Ha Paek, Andres M. Lozano and Kendall H. Lee

Object

A challenge associated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) in treating advanced Parkinson disease (PD) is the direct visualization of brain nuclei, which often involves indirect approximations of stereotactic targets. In the present study, the authors compared T2*-weighted images obtained using 7-T MR imaging with those obtained using 1.5- and 3-T MR imaging to ascertain whether 7-T imaging enables better visualization of targets for DBS in PD.

Methods

The authors compared 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T MR images obtained in 11 healthy volunteers and 1 patient with PD.

Results

With 7-T imaging, distinct images of the brain were obtained, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi). Compared with the 1.5- and 3-T MR images of the STN and GPi, the 7-T MR images showed marked improvements in spatial resolution, tissue contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio.

Conclusions

Data in this study reveal the superiority of 7-T MR imaging for visualizing structures targeted for DBS in the management of PD. This finding suggests that by enabling the direct visualization of neural structures of interest, 7-T MR imaging could be a valuable aid in neurosurgical procedures.