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  • Author or Editor: Berksu Curebal x
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Berksu Curebal, Nazan Dalgic and Banu Bayraktar

Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt infections are seen in 3%–17% of patients with VP shunts. These infections may cause severe morbidity and mortality. Staphylococci are the most common cause of CSF shunt-associated infections, although gram-negative bacteria (especially multidrug-resistant [MDR] and extensive drug–resistant [XDR] bacteria) also play an important role. Due to increased antibiotic resistance, sometimes off-label usage of antibiotics is considered. Tigecycline is one of these antibiotics. It should not be used unless there are no other antibiotic treatment options available, especially in children. It belongs to the glycylcycline class of antibiotic agents and inhibits protein translation in bacteria by binding to the 30S ribosomal subunit. The authors describe the case of a patient who had an XDR Klebsiella pneumoniae–positive VP shunt infection. After removal of his VP shunt, an external ventricular drain was inserted, and the patient was treated with a combination of intravenous (1.2 mg/kg/day) and intraventricular (4 mg/day) tigecycline in addition to his meropenem (120 mg/kg/day) treatment. On the 7th day of the combined therapy, his CSF culture was sterile. Because tigecycline distribution into the tissues is not sufficient with intravenous administration, combining it with intraventricular infusion can provide new treatment methods. However, further studies are needed for its use as a treatment method in children.

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Berksu Curebal, Nazan Dalgic and Banu Bayraktar

Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt infections are seen in 3%–17% of patients with VP shunts. These infections may cause severe morbidity and mortality. Staphylococci are the most common cause of CSF shunt-associated infections, although gram-negative bacteria (especially multidrug-resistant [MDR] and extensive drug–resistant [XDR] bacteria) also play an important role. Due to increased antibiotic resistance, sometimes off-label usage of antibiotics is considered. Tigecycline is one of these antibiotics. It should not be used unless there are no other antibiotic treatment options available, especially in children. It belongs to the glycylcycline class of antibiotic agents and inhibits protein translation in bacteria by binding to the 30S ribosomal subunit. The authors describe the case of a patient who had an XDR Klebsiella pneumoniae–positive VP shunt infection. After removal of his VP shunt, an external ventricular drain was inserted, and the patient was treated with a combination of intravenous (1.2 mg/kg/day) and intraventricular (4 mg/day) tigecycline in addition to his meropenem (120 mg/kg/day) treatment. On the 7th day of the combined therapy, his CSF culture was sterile. Because tigecycline distribution into the tissues is not sufficient with intravenous administration, combining it with intraventricular infusion can provide new treatment methods. However, further studies are needed for its use as a treatment method in children.