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Benjamin T. Himes, Thomas J. Wilson, Andres A. Maldonado, Naveen S. Murthy and Robert J. Spinner

The authors present a case of delayed peroneal neuropathy following a lateral gastrocnemius rotational flap reconstruction. The patient presented 1.5 years after surgery with a new partial foot drop, which progressed over 3 years. At operation, a fascial band on the deep side of the gastrocnemius flap was compressing the common peroneal nerve proximal to the fibular head, correlating with preoperative imaging. Release of this fascial band and selective muscle resection led to immediate improvement in symptoms postoperatively.

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Benjamin T. Himes, Michael W. Ruff, Jaimie J. Van Gompel, Sean S. Park, Evanthia Galanis, Timothy J. Kaufmann and Joon H. Uhm

The authors present the case of a man with a papillary craniopharyngioma, first diagnosed at 47 years of age, who experienced multiple recurrences. Review of the pathologic specimen from his first resection demonstrated the BRAF V600E mutation. With his most recent recurrence following previous surgery and radiotherapy, at 52 years of age, the decision was made to initiate treatment with the BRAF V600E inhibitor dabrafenib. Imaging following initiation of dabrafenib demonstrated reduction in tumor size. He remained on dabrafenib therapy for approximately 1 year and continued to demonstrate a good clinical result. At that time the decision was made to discontinue dabrafenib therapy and follow up with serial imaging. After more than 1 year of follow-up since stopping dabrafenib, the patient has continued to do well with no radiographic evidence of tumor progression and continues to be monitored with frequent interval imaging.

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Benjamin T. Himes, Michael W. Ruff, Jaimie J. Van Gompel, Sean S. Park, Evanthia Galanis, Timothy J. Kaufmann and Joon H. Uhm

The authors present the case of a man with a papillary craniopharyngioma, first diagnosed at 47 years of age, who experienced multiple recurrences. Review of the pathologic specimen from his first resection demonstrated the BRAF V600E mutation. With his most recent recurrence following previous surgery and radiotherapy, at 52 years of age, the decision was made to initiate treatment with the BRAF V600E inhibitor dabrafenib. Imaging following initiation of dabrafenib demonstrated reduction in tumor size. He remained on dabrafenib therapy for approximately 1 year and continued to demonstrate a good clinical result. At that time the decision was made to discontinue dabrafenib therapy and follow up with serial imaging. After more than 1 year of follow-up since stopping dabrafenib, the patient has continued to do well with no radiographic evidence of tumor progression and continues to be monitored with frequent interval imaging.

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Benjamin T. Himes, Grant W. Mallory, Arnoley S. Abcejo, Jeffrey Pasternak, John L. D. Atkinson, Fredric B. Meyer, W. Richard Marsh, Michael J. Link, Michelle J. Clarke, William Perkins and Jamie J. Van Gompel

OBJECTIVE

Historically, performing neurosurgery with the patient in the sitting position offered advantages such as improved visualization and gravity-assisted retraction. However, this position fell out of favor at many centers due to the perceived risk of venous air embolism (VAE) and other position-related complications. Some neurosurgical centers continue to perform sitting-position cases in select patients, often using modern monitoring techniques that may improve procedural safety. Therefore, this paper reports the risks associated with neurosurgical procedures performed in the sitting position in a modern series.

METHODS

The authors reviewed the anesthesia records for instances of clinically significant VAE and other complications for all neurosurgical procedures performed in the sitting position between January 1, 2000, and October 8, 2013. In addition, a prospectively maintained morbidity and mortality log of these procedures was reviewed for instances of subdural or intracerebral hemorrhage, tension pneumocephalus, and quadriplegia. Both overall and specific complication rates were calculated in relation to the specific type of procedure.

RESULTS

In a series of 1792 procedures, the overall complication rate related to the sitting position was 1.45%, which included clinically significant VAE, tension pneumocephalus, and subdural hemorrhage. The rate of any detected VAE was 4.7%, but the rate of VAE requiring clinical intervention was 1.06%. The risk of clinically significant VAE was highest in patients undergoing suboccipital craniotomy/craniectomy with a rate of 2.7% and an odds ratio (OR) of 2.8 relative to deep brain stimulator cases (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–70, p = 0.04). Sitting cervical spine cases had a comparatively lower complication rate of 0.7% and an OR of 0.28 as compared with all cranial procedures (95% CI 0.12–0.67, p < 0.01). Sitting cervical cases were further subdivided into extradural and intradural procedures. The rate of complications in intradural cases was significantly higher (OR 7.3, 95% CI 1.4–39, p = 0.02) than for extradural cases. The risk of VAE in intradural spine procedures did not differ significantly from sitting suboccipital craniotomy/craniectomy cases (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.09–5.4, p = 0.7). Two cases (0.1%) had to be aborted intraoperatively due to complications. There were no instances of intraoperative deaths, although there was a single death within 30 days of surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large, modern series of cases performed in the sitting position, the complication rate was low. Suboccipital craniotomy/craniectomy was associated with the highest risk of complications. When appropriately used with modern anesthesia techniques, the sitting position provides a safe means of surgical access.