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  • Author or Editor: Ashutosh P. Jadhav x
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Bradley A. Gross, Ashutosh P. Jadhav, Brian T. Jankowitz and Tudor G. Jovin

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Bradley A. Gross, Felipe C. Albuquerque, Cameron G. McDougall, Brian T. Jankowitz, Ashutosh P. Jadhav, Tudor G. Jovin and Rose Du

The authors attempted to better delineate the natural course of untreated cerebral dural arteriovenous fistulas. For a group of 295 fistulas, drainage pattern was most important in predicting the risk of future neurological events or bleeding. Moreover, presentation with a neurological event or hemorrhage was an independent risk factor for future neurological events or hemorrhage, respectively. The authors provided hemorrhage rates for various subclasses of dural arteriovenous fistulas to facilitate risk stratification, excluding partially treated lesions.

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Jennifer L. Perez, Michael M. McDowell, Benjamin Zussman, Ashutosh P. Jadhav, Yosuke Miyashita, Patrick McKiernan and Stephanie Greene

Aneurysmal rupture can result in devastating neurological consequences and can be complicated by comorbid disease processes. Patients with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) have a low rate of reported aneurysms, but this may be due to the relative high rate of end-stage illnesses early in childhood. Authors here report the case of a 10-year-old boy with ARPKD who presented with a Hunt and Hess grade V subarachnoid hemorrhage requiring emergency ventriculostomy, embolization, and decompressive craniectomy. Despite initial improvements in his neurological status, the patient succumbed to hepatic failure. Given the catastrophic outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage in young patients, early radiographic screening in those with ARPKD may be warranted.

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Gurpreet S. Gandhoke, Yash K. Pandya, Ashutosh P. Jadhav, Tudor Jovin, Robert M. Friedlander, Kenneth J. Smith and Brian T. Jankowitz

OBJECTIVE

The price of coils used for intracranial aneurysm embolization has continued to rise despite an increase in competition in the marketplace. Coils on the US market range in list price from $500 to $3000. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential cost savings with the use of a price capitation model.

METHODS

The authors built a clinical decision analytical tree and compared their institution’s current expenditure on endovascular coils to the costs if a capped-price model were implemented. They retrospectively reviewed coil and cost data for 148 patients who underwent coil embolization from January 2015 through September 2016. Data on the length and number of coils used in all patients were collected and analyzed. The probabilities of a treated aneurysm being ≤/> 10 mm in maximum dimension, the total number of coils used for a case being ≤/> 5, and the total length of coils used for a case being ≤/> 50 cm were calculated, as was the mean cost of the currently used coils for all possible combinations of events with these probabilities. Using the same probabilities, the authors calculated the expected value of the capped-price strategy in comparison with the current one. They also conducted multiple 1-way sensitivity analyses by applying plausible ranges to the probabilities and cost variables. The robustness of the results was confirmed by applying individual distributions to all studied variables and conducting probabilistic sensitivity analysis.

RESULTS

Ninety-five (64%) of 148 patients presented with a rupture, and 53 (36%) were treated on an elective basis. The mean aneurysm size was 6.7 mm. A total of 1061 coils were used from a total of 4 different providers. Companies A (72%) and B (16%) accounted for the major share of coil consumption. The mean number of coils per case was 7.3. The mean cost per case (for all coils) was $10,434. The median total length of coils used, for all coils, was 42 cm. The calculated probability of treating an aneurysm less than 10 mm in maximum dimension was 0.83, for using 5 coils or fewer per case it was 0.42, and for coil length of 50 cm or less it was 0.89. The expected cost per case with the capped policy was calculated to be $4000, a cost savings of $6564 in comparison with using the price of Company A. Multiple 1-way sensitivity analyses revealed that the capped policy was cost saving if its cost was less than $10,500. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the lowest cost difference between current and capped policies was $2750.

CONCLUSIONS

In comparison with the cost of coils from the authors’ current provider, their decision model and probabilistic sensitivity analysis predicted a minimum $407,000 to a maximum $1,799,976 cost savings in 148 cases by adapting the capped-price policy for coils.

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Jennifer L. Perez, Michael M. McDowell, Benjamin Zussman, Ashutosh P. Jadhav, Yosuke Miyashita, Patrick McKiernan and Stephanie Greene

Aneurysmal rupture can result in devastating neurological consequences and can be complicated by comorbid disease processes. Patients with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) have a low rate of reported aneurysms, but this may be due to the relative high rate of end-stage illnesses early in childhood. Authors here report the case of a 10-year-old boy with ARPKD who presented with a Hunt and Hess grade V subarachnoid hemorrhage requiring emergency ventriculostomy, embolization, and decompressive craniectomy. Despite initial improvements in his neurological status, the patient succumbed to hepatic failure. Given the catastrophic outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage in young patients, early radiographic screening in those with ARPKD may be warranted.