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Andreas Raabe and Volker Seifert

✓ The S-100B protein is a small cytosolic protein that is found in astroglial or Schwann cells. It is highly specific for brain tissue and is increasingly being investigated as a diagnostic tool to assess the neurological damage after head injury, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and cardiopulmonary bypass.

The authors report on three patients with severe head injury with otherwise normal cerebral perfusion pressure, SaO2, PaCO2, and controlled intracranial pressure (ICP), in whom a secondary excessive increase in serum S-100B was observed. In all cases, the S-100B increase was followed by an increase in ICP. All three patients died within 72 hours after the excessive increase in S-100B. These findings indicate that major secondary brain damage may occur at a cellular level without being identified by current neuromonitoring techniques.

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Clemens Raabe, Jens Fichtner, Jürgen Beck, Jan Gralla and Andreas Raabe

OBJECTIVE

Frontal ventriculostomy is one of the most frequent and standardized procedures in neurosurgery. However, many first and subsequent punctures miss the target, and suboptimal placement or misplacement of the catheter is common. The authors therefore reexamined the landmarks and rules to determine the entry point and trajectory with the best hit rate (HtR).

METHODS

The authors randomly selected CT scans from their institution’s DICOM pool that had been obtained in 50 patients with normal ventricular and skull anatomy and without ventricular puncture. Using a 5 × 5–cm frontal grid with 25 entry points referenced to the bregma, the authors examined trajectories 1) perpendicular to the skull, 2) toward classic facial landmarks in the coronal and sagittal planes, and 3) toward an idealized target in the middle of the ipsilateral anterior horn (ILAH). Three-dimensional virtual reality ventriculostomies were simulated for these entry points; trajectories and the HtRs were recorded, resulting in an investigation of 8000 different virtual procedures.

RESULTS

The best HtR for the ILAH was 86% for an ideal trajectory, 84% for a landmark trajectory, and 83% for a 90° trajectory, but only at specific entry points. The highest HtRs were found for entry points 3 or 4 cm lateral to the midline, but only in combination with a trajectory toward the contralateral canthus; and 1 or 2 cm lateral to the midline, but only paired with a trajectory toward the nasion. The same “pairing” exists for entry points and trajectories in the sagittal plane. For perpendicular (90°) trajectories, the best entry points were at 3–5 cm lateral to the midline and 3 cm anterior to the bregma, or 4 cm lateral to the midline and 2 cm anterior to the bregma.

CONCLUSIONS

Only a few entry points offer a chance of a greater than 80% rate of hitting the ILAH, and then only in combination with a specific trajectory. This “pairing” between entry point and trajectory was found both for landmark targeting and for perpendicular trajectories, with very limited variability. Surprisingly, the ipsilateral medial canthus, a commonly reported landmark, had low HtRs, and should not be recommended as a trajectory target.

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Anthony C. Wang and Roberto C. Heros

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Andreas Raabe, Jürgen Beck, Philippe Schucht and Kathleen Seidel

Object

The authors developed a new mapping technique to overcome the temporal and spatial limitations of classic subcortical mapping of the corticospinal tract (CST). The feasibility and safety of continuous (0.4–2 Hz) and dynamic (at the site of and synchronized with tissue resection) subcortical motor mapping was evaluated.

Methods

The authors prospectively studied 69 patients who underwent tumor surgery adjacent to the CST (< 1 cm using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tracking) with simultaneous subcortical monopolar motor mapping (short train, interstimulus interval 4 msec, pulse duration 500 μsec) and a new acoustic motor evoked potential alarm. Continuous (temporal coverage) and dynamic (spatial coverage) mapping was technically realized by integrating the mapping probe at the tip of a new suction device, with the concept that this device will be in contact with the tissue where the resection is performed. Motor function was assessed 1 day after surgery, at discharge, and at 3 months.

Results

All procedures were technically successful. There was a 1:1 correlation of motor thresholds for stimulation sites simultaneously mapped with the new suction mapping device and the classic fingerstick probe (24 patients, 74 stimulation points; r2 = 0.98, p < 0.001). The lowest individual motor thresholds were as follows: > 20 mA, 7 patients; 11–20 mA, 13 patients; 6–10 mA, 8 patients; 4–5 mA, 17 patients; and 1–3 mA, 24 patients. At 3 months, 2 patients (3%) had a persistent postoperative motor deficit, both of which were caused by a vascular injury. No patient had a permanent motor deficit caused by a mechanical injury of the CST.

Conclusions

Continuous dynamic mapping was found to be a feasible and ergonomic technique for localizing the exact site of the CST and distance to the motor fibers. The acoustic feedback and the ability to stimulate the tissue continuously and exactly at the site of tissue removal improves the accuracy of mapping, especially at low (< 5 mA) stimulation intensities. This new technique may increase the safety of motor eloquent tumor surgery.

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Jens Fichtner, Erdem Güresir, Volker Seifert and Andreas Raabe

Object

Catheter-related infection of CSF is a potentially life-threatening complication of external ventricular drainage (EVD). When using EVD catheters, contact between the ventricular system and skin surface occurs and CSF infection is possible. The aim of this analysis was to compare the efficacy of silver-bearing EVD catheters for reducing the incidence of infection with standard nonimpregnated EVD catheters in neurosurgical patients with acute hydrocephalus.

Methods

Two hundred thirty-one consecutive patients were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, 164 were enrolled in the final analysis. Six patient charts were incomplete or missing, 15 patients were excluded because of catheter insertion within the previous 30 days, 6 because of a suspected CSF infection before ventriculostomy, 7 because the catheter was removed < 24 hours after insertion, and 33 patients because of the requirement of bilateral ventriculostomy. The control group with standard nonimpregnated EVD catheters consisted of 90 patients. The study group with silver-bearing EVDs consisted of 74 patients. For assessing the primary outcome, the authors recorded all CSF samples and liquor cell counts routinely obtained in sterile fashion. After removal of the catheters, they also reviewed microbiology reports of the removed catheters to assess colonization of the catheter tips.

Results

The occurrence of a positive CSF culture, colonization of the catheter tip, or liquor pleocytosis (white blood cell count > 4/μl) was ~ 2 times less in the study group with silver-bearing EVD catheters than that in the control group (18.9% compared with 33.7%, p = 0.04). Positive CSF cultures alone occurred 2 times less frequently for microorganisms in the study group (2.7% compared with 4.7%, p = 0.55). Silver-bearing catheters were 4 times less likely to become colonized as nonimpregnated EVDs (1.4% compared with 5.8%, p = 0.14). Liquor pleocytosis was half as likely in the study group (17.6% compared with 30.2%, p = 0.06).

Conclusions

Although of limited sample size and thus underpowered for subgroup analysis, this analysis indicates that EVD catheters impregnated with silver nanoparticles and an insoluble silver salt may reduce the risk of catheter-related infections in neurosurgical patients.

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Andreas Raabe and Bertil Romner

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Colette Boëx, Shahan Momjian and Karl Schaller

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Andreas Raabe and Robert F. Spetzler

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Andreas Raabe, Jürgen Beck, Stefan Rohde, Joachim Berkefeld and Volker Seifert

Object

The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of integrating three-dimensional rotational angiography (3D-RA) data into a surgical navigation system and to assess its accuracy and potential clinical benefit.

Methods

The study cohort consisted of 16 patients with 16 intracranial aneurysms who had been scheduled for routine or emergency surgery. Rotational angiography data were exported using a virtual reality modeling language file format and imported into the BrainLAB VectorVision2 image-guided surgery equipment. During 3D-RA the position of the head was measured using a special headframe. The authors also determined the accuracy of 3D-RA image guidance and the clinical benefit as judged by the surgeon, including, for example, early identification of branching vessels and the aneurysm.

There was good correspondence between the 3D-RA–based navigation data and the intraoperative vascular anatomy in all cases, with a maximum error of 9° of angulation and 9° of rotation. In eight cases, the surgeon determined that the 3D-RA image guidance facilitated the surgical procedure by predicting the location of the aneurysm or the origin of a branching artery that had been covered by brain tissue and blood clots.

Conclusions

The integration of 3D-RA into surgical navigation systems is feasible, but it currently requires a new perspective-registration technique. The intraoperative 3D view provides useful information about the vascular anatomy and may improve the quality of aneurysm surgery in selected cases.

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Juergen Konczalla, Volker Seifert, Juergen Beck, Erdem Güresir, Hartmut Vatter, Andreas Raabe and Gerhard Marquardt

OBJECTIVE

Outcome analysis of comatose patients (Hunt and Hess Grade V) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is still lacking. The aims of this study were to analyze the outcome of Hunt and Hess Grade V SAH and to compare outcomes in the current period with those of the pre–International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) era as well as with published data from trials of decompressive craniectomy (DC) for middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction.

METHODS

The authors analyzed cases of Hunt and Hess Grade V SAH from 1980–1995 (referred to in this study as the earlier period) and 2005–2014 (current period) and compared the results for the 2 periods. The outcomes of 257 cases were analyzed and stratified on the basis of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores obtained 6 months after SAH. Outcomes were dichotomized as favorable (mRS score of 0–2) or unfavorable (mRS score of 3–6). Data and number needed to treat (NNT) were also compared with the results of decompressive craniectomy (DC) trials for middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarctions.

RESULTS

Early aneurysm treatment within 72 hours occurred significantly more often in the current period (in 67% of cases vs 22% in earlier period). In the earlier period, patients had a significantly higher 30-day mortality rate (83% vs 39% in the current period) and 6-month mortality rate (94% vs 49%), and no patient (0%) had a favorable outcome, compared with 23% overall in the current period (p < 0.01, OR 32), or 29.5% of patients whose aneurysms were treated (p < 0.01, OR 219). Cerebral infarctions occurred in up to 65% of the treated patients in the current period.

Comparison with data from DC MCA trials showed that the NNTs were significantly lower in the current period with 2 for survival and 3 for mRS score of 0–3 (vs 3 and 7, respectively, for the DC MCA trials).

CONCLUSIONS

Early and aggressive treatment resulted in a significant improvement in survival rate (NNT = 2) and favorable outcome (NNT = 3 for mRS score of 0–3) for comatose patients with Hunt and Hess Grade V SAH compared with the earlier period. Independent predictors for favorable outcome were younger age and bilateral intact corneal reflexes. Despite a high rate of cerebral infarction (65%) in the current period, 29.5% of the patients who received treatment for their aneurysms during the current era (2005–2014) had a favorable outcome. However, careful individual decision making is essential in these cases.