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André Beer-Furlan, Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Krishna C. Joshi, and Michael Chen

Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are uncommon, complex fistulas located between the leaves of the tentorium cerebelli with a specific anatomic and clinical presentation characterized by high hemorrhagic risk. They have an extensive arterial supply and complex venous drainages, making them difficult to treat. There is recent literature favoring treatment through an endovascular transarterial route. The authors present an uncommon tentorial/ambient cistern region DAVF with feeders arising from the external and internal carotid arteries. The patient underwent a combined transarterial and transvenous approach with successful obliteration of the DAVF. The authors discuss the management challenges faced in this case.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/VXDD8zUvsSQ.

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André Beer-Furlan, Krishna C. Joshi, Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, and Michael Chen

Superior sagittal sinus (SSS) dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are rare and present unique challenges to treatment. Complex, often bilateral, arterial supply and involvement of large volumes of eloquent cortical venous drainage may necessitate multimodality therapy such as endovascular, microsurgical, and stereotactic radiosurgery techniques. The authors present a complex SSS DAVF associated with an occluded/severely stenotic SSS. The patient underwent a successful endovascular transvenous approach with complete obliteration of the SSS. The authors discuss the management challenges faced on this case.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/-rztg0_cBXY.

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André Beer-Furlan, Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Krishna C. Joshi, and Michael Chen

Acute basilar artery occlusion is one of the most devastating subtypes of ischemic stroke with an extremely high morbidity and mortality rate. The most common causes include embolism, large-artery atherosclerosis, penetrating small-artery disease, and arterial dissection. The heart and vertebral arteries are the main source of emboli in embolic basilar occlusions. The authors present an uncommon acute basilar occlusion secondary to a fusiform aneurysm with intraluminal thrombus. The patient underwent a mechanical thrombectomy with successful recanalization, but persistent intraluminal thrombus. The authors discuss the management dilemma and describe their choice for placement of flow diverter stents.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/XzBdgxJPSWQ.

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André Beer-Furlan, Ali O. Jamshidi, Ricardo L. Carrau, and Daniel M. Prevedello

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André Beer-Furlan, Bradley A. Otto, Ricardo L. Carrau, and Daniel M. Prevedello

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Krishna C. Joshi, Daniel M. Heiferman, André Beer-Furlan, and Demetrius K. Lopes

External carotid artery (ECA) to internal carotid artery (ICA) bypass is a well-established procedure for the treatment of chronic ischemic diseases of the carotid artery. Rarely de novo aneurysms can develop at the site of anastomosis. The treatment of these aneurysms can be very challenging due to various factors, including the presence of graft, previous craniotomy, atherosclerotic vessels, and lack of direct access. In this video the authors report and discuss the management of a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) wide-necked de novo aneurysm by stent-assisted coiling through a retrograde trans-posterior communicating artery access.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/MBKolPvOErU.

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André Beer-Furlan, Diego A. Servián, Ricardo L. Carrau, and Daniel M. Prevedello

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Alaa S. Montaser, Juan M. Revuelta Barbero, Alexandre Todeschini, André Beer-Furlan, Russell R. Lonser, Ricardo L. Carrau, and Daniel M. Prevedello

A 69-year-old female with incidental diagnosis of a dorsum sellae meningioma had shown significant tumor growth after initial conservative management. The procedure started with a microscopic sublabial transsphenoidal approach to the sella and the suprasellar space. Due to limitations to a safe dissection and removal of the retrosellar component, the surgery was converted to a purely endoscopic endonasal approach with left hemi-transposition of the pituitary gland, followed by drilling of the dorsum sellae and removal of the left posterior clinoid process. A complete tumor resection was achieved, and a multilayer skull base reconstruction was performed without complications.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/BEolyK-To_A.

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Max Whitmeyer, Bledi C. Brahimaj, André Beer-Furlan, Sameer Alvi, Madeline J. Epsten, Fred Crawford, Richard W. Byrne, and R. Mark Wiet

OBJECTIVE

Multiple short series have evaluated the efficacy of salvage microsurgery (MS) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VSs); however, there is a lack of a large volume of patient data available for interpretation and clinical adaptation. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of tumor characteristics, management, and surgical outcomes of salvage of MS after SRS for VS.

METHODS

The Medline/PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases were queried according to PRISMA guidelines. All English-language and translated publications were included. Studies lacking adequate study characteristics and outcomes were excluded. Cases involving neurofibromatosis type 2, previous MS, or malignant transformation were excluded when possible.

RESULTS

Twenty studies containing 297 cases met inclusion criteria. Three additional cases from Rush University Medical Center were added for 300 total cases. Tumor growth with or without symptoms was the primary indication for salvage surgery (92.3% of cases), followed by worsening of symptoms without growth (4.6%) and cystic enlargement (3.1%). The average time to MS after SRS was 39.4 months. The average size and volume of tumor at surgery were 2.44 cm and 5.92 cm3, respectively. The surgical approach was retrosigmoid (42.8%) and translabyrinthine (57.2%); 59.5% of patients had a House-Brackmann (HB) grade of I or II. The facial nerve was preserved in 91.5% of cases. Facial nerve preservation and HB grades were lower for the translabyrinthine versus retrosigmoid approach (p = 0.31 and p = 0.18, respectively); however, fewer complications were noted in the translabyrinthine approach (p = 0.29). Gross-total resection (GTR) was completed in 55.7% of surgeries. Studies that predominantly used subtotal resection (STR) were associated with a lower rate of facial nerve injury (5.3% vs 11.3%, p = 0.07) and higher rate of HB grade I or II (72.9% vs 48.0%, p = 0.00003) versus those using predominantly GTR. However, majority STR was associated with a recurrence rate of 3.6% as compared to 1.4% for majority GTR (p = 0.29).

CONCLUSIONS

This study showed that the leading cause of MS after SRS was tumor growth at an average of 39.4 months after radiation. There were no significant differences in outcomes of facial nerve preservation, postoperative HB grade, or complication rate based on surgical approach. Patients who underwent STR showed statistically significant better HB outcomes compared with GTR. MS after SRS was considered by most authors to be more difficult than primary MS. These data support the notion that the surgical goals of salvage surgery are debulking of tumor mass, decreasing compression of the brainstem, and not necessarily pursuing GTR.