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  • Author or Editor: Amy S. Nowacki x
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Sara J. Hardy, Amy S. Nowacki, Mary Bertin and Robert J. Weil

Object

In select patient populations, hyperglycemia has been shown to increase the risk of surgical site infection (SSI), whereas stringent glucose control has improved outcomes. To date, no study has focused on whether SSIs in patients with brain tumors undergoing resection are associated with hyperglycemia.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent a craniotomy after receiving a diagnosis of brain tumor. From 2001 to 2008, 2485 patients underwent a craniotomy for tumor resection at the Brain Tumor & Neuro-Oncology Center at the Cleveland Clinic. Fifty-seven of these patients (2.3%) developed SSIs postoperatively. A matched case-control study design was used, with 57 patients who developed SSIs after craniotomy (cases) matched with 57 patients who did not develop SSIs (controls). The results were analyzed using both univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression.

Results

Glucose level was not a significant factor in postoperative SSI (p = 0.83) after adjusting for duration of surgery and adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis. However, duration of surgery was significantly associated with postoperative SSI (p = 0.047).

Conclusions

For patients who undergo craniotomy for definitive resection of a brain tumor, duration of surgery described more variation in the model to predict SSI than blood glucose levels.

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Kalil G. Abdullah, Amy S. Nowacki, Michael P. Steinmetz, Jeffrey C. Wang and Thomas E. Mroz

Object

The C-7 lateral mass has been considered difficult to fit with instrumentation because of its unique anatomy. Of the methods that exist for placing lateral mass screws, none particularly accommodates this anatomical variation. The authors have related 12 distinct morphological measures of the C-7 lateral mass to the ability to place a lateral mass screw using the Magerl, Roy-Camille, and a modified Roy-Camille method.

Methods

Using CT scans, the authors performed virtual screw placement of lateral mass screws at the C-7 level in 25 male and 25 female patients. Complications recorded included foraminal and articular process violations, inability to achieve bony purchase, and inability to place a screw longer than 6 mm. Violations were monitored in the coronal, axial, and sagittal planes. The Roy-Camille technique was applied starting directly in the middle of the lateral mass, as defined by Pait's quadrants, with an axial angle of 15° lateral and a sagittal angle of 90°. The Magerl technique was performed by starting in the inferior portion of the top right square of Pait's quadrants and angling 25° laterally in the axial plane with a 45° cephalad angle in the sagittal plane. In a modified method, the starting point is similar to the Magerl technique in the top right square of Pait's quadrant and then angling 15° laterally in the axial plane. In the sagittal plane, a 90° angle is taken perpendicular to the dorsal portion of the lateral mass, as in the traditional Roy-Camille technique.

Results

Of all the morphological methods analyzed, only a combined measure of intrusion of the T-1 facet and the overall length of the C-7 lateral mass was statistically associated with screw placement, and only in the Roy-Camille technique. Use of the Magerl technique allowed screw placement in 28 patients; use of the Roy-Camille technique allowed placement in 24 patients; and use of the modified technique allowed placement in 46 patients. No screw placement by any method was possible in 4 patients.

Conclusions

There is only one distinct anatomical ratio that was shown to affect lateral mass screw placement at C-7. This ratio incorporates the overall length of the lateral mass and the amount of space occupied by the T-1 facet at C-7. Based on this virtual study, a modified Roy-Camille technique that utilizes a higher starting point may decrease the complication rate at C-7 by avoiding placement of the lateral mass screw into the T1 facet.

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Matthew M. Grabowski, Pablo F. Recinos, Amy S. Nowacki, Jason L. Schroeder, Lilyana Angelov, Gene H. Barnett and Michael A. Vogelbaum

Object

The impact of extent of resection (EOR) on survival for patients with glioblastoma (GBM) continues to be a point of debate despite multiple studies demonstrating that increasing EOR likely extends survival for these patients. In addition, contrast-enhancing residual tumor volume (CE-RTV) alone has rarely been analyzed quantitatively to determine if it is a predictor of outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CE-RTV and T2/FLAIR residual volume (T2/F-RV) on overall survival.

Methods

A retrospective review of 128 patients who underwent primary resection of supratentorial GBM followed by standard radiation/chemotherapy was undertaken utilizing quantitative, volumetric analysis of pre- and postoperative MR images. The results were compared with clinical data obtained from the patients' medical records.

Results

At analysis, 8% of patients were alive, and no patients were lost to follow-up. The overall median survival was 13.8 months, with a median Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score of 90 at presentation. The median contrast-enhancing preoperative tumor volume (CE-PTV) was 29.0 cm3, and CE-RTV was 1.2 cm3, equating to a 95.8% median EOR. The median T2/F-RV was 36.8 cm3. CE-PTV, CE-RTV, T2/F-RV, and EOR were all statistically significant predictors of survival when controlling for age and KPS score. A statistically significant benefit in survival was seen with a CE-RTV less than 2 cm3 or an EOR greater than 98%. Evaluation of the volumetric analysis methodology was performed by observers of varying degrees of experience—an attending neurosurgeon, a fellow, and a medical student. Both the medical student and fellow recorded correlation coefficients of 0.98 when compared with the attending surgeon's measured volumes of CE-PTV, while for CE-RTV, correlation coefficients of 0.67 and 0.71 (medical student and fellow, respectively) were obtained.

Conclusions

CE-RTV and EOR were found to be significant predictors of survival after GBM resection. CERTV was the more significant predictor of survival compared with EOR, suggesting that the volume of residual contrast-enhancing tumor may be a more accurate and meaningful reflection of the pathobiology of GBM.

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Daniel Lubelski, Kalil G. Abdullah, Amy S. Nowacki, Matthew D. Alvin, Michael P. Steinmetz, Srita Chakka, Yumeng Li, Nicholas Gajewski, Edward C. Benzel and Thomas E. Mroz

Object

The goal of this study was to compare the urological complications in patients after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with and without the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein–2 (rhBMP-2).

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent ALIF with and without rhBMP-2 between January 2002 and August 2010. Patient demographic, operative, and complication information was analyzed. Male patients who underwent ALIF between L-4 and S-1 were contacted to assess postoperative urological complications.

Results

Of the 110 male patients who underwent ALIF and were included in this study, 59 were treated with rhBMP-2 and 51 did not receive rhBMP-2. The mean follow-up duration was 17.5 months for the rhBMP-2 group and 30.8 months for the control group. No difference was found regarding the total number of urological complications in the rhBMP-2 group versus the control group (22% vs 20%, respectively; p = 1.0) or for retrograde ejaculation specifically (8% vs 8%, respectively; p = 1.0).

Conclusions

In this study, the use of rhBMP-2 with ALIF surgery was not associated with an increased incidence of urological complications and retrograde ejaculation when compared with control ALIF without rhBMP-2. Further prospective analyses that specifically look at these complications are warranted.

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Mark N. Hadley