Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 65 items for

  • Author or Editor: Allan D. Levi x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

S. Shelby Burks, David J. Levi, Seth Hayes, and Allan D. Levi

Object

The object of this study was to highlight the challenge of insufficient donor graft material in peripheral nerve surgery, with a specific focus on sciatic nerve transection requiring autologous sural nerve graft.

Methods

The authors performed an anatomical analysis of cadaveric sciatic and sural nerve tissue. To complement this they also present 3 illustrative clinical cases of sciatic nerve injuries with segmental defects. In the anatomical study, the cross-sectional area (CSA), circumference, diameter, percentage of neural tissue, fat content of the sural nerves, as well as the number of fascicles, were measured from cadaveric samples. The percentage of neural tissue was defined as the CSA of fascicles lined by perineurium relative to the CSA of the sural nerve surrounded by epineurium.

Results

Sural nerve samples were obtained from 8 cadaveric specimens. Mean values and standard deviations from sural nerve measurements were as follows: CSA 2.84 ± 0.91 mm2, circumference 6.67 ± 1.60 mm, diameter 2.36 ± 0.43 mm, fat content 0.83 ± 0.91 mm2, and number of fascicles 9.88 ± 3.68. The percentage of neural tissue seen on sural nerve cross-section was 33.17% ± 4.96%. One sciatic nerve was also evaluated. It had a CSA of 37.50 mm2, with 56% of the CSA representing nerve material. The estimated length of sciatic nerve that could be repaired with a bilateral sural nerve harvest (85 cm) varied from as little as 2.5 cm to as much as 8 cm.

Conclusions

Multiple methods have been used in the past to repair sciatic nerve injury but most commonly, when a considerable gap is present, autologous nerve grafting is required, with sural nerve being the foremost source. As evidenced by the anatomical data reported in this study, a considerable degree of variability exists in the diameter of sural nerve harvests. Conversely, the percentage of neural tissue is relatively consistent across specimens. The authors recommend that the peripheral nerve surgeon take these points into consideration during nerve grafting as insufficient graft material may preclude successful recovery.

Restricted access

Adam S. Rochman, Elizabeth Vitarbo, and Allan D. Levi

✓ The authors report a case of traumatic femoral nerve palsy caused by a pseudoaneurysm of the iliolumbar artery and a iliacus muscle hematoma. This case report details not only the classic history and physical findings seen in patients such as this one, but also illustrates an unusual source of the hematoma and a discussion of its treatment.

A 20-year-old man was assaulted and presented to the authors's institution with a 1-week history of severe pain in the left anterior thigh and groin, weakness in the left quadriceps muscle, and numbness in the anterior thigh and medial distal leg. Imaging studies demonstrated a large, 9.4 × 6.4 × 5.2-cm iliacus hematoma as well as a pseudoaneurysm originating from the left iliolumbar artery. The patient underwent angiographic embolization of the pseudoaneurysm followed by surgical evacuation of the hematoma. The embolization was performed before surgery to prevent any possible rebleeding from the pseudoaneurysm during evacuation of the hematoma.

Femoral nerve palsy caused by traumatic iliacus hematoma is an infrequent diagnosis often missed because of its insidious presentation. In this case, embolization of the iliolumbar artery pseudoaneurysm followed by surgical evacuation of the hematoma resulted in a nearly full recovery of the femoral nerve as of the last follow-up examination.

Full access

Michael Y Wang and Allan D. O. Levi

Occipital neuralgia is a result of neuropathic pain transmission in the distribution of the greater occipital nerve. Because it is well anatomically localized, occipital neuralgia has been the focus of various surgical treatments. Ablation, decompression, and modulation of the C-2 nerve have all been described as effective treatments. The C-2 dorsal root ganglionectomy provides effective treatment for this disorder with a low incidence of unpleasant side effects. In this review the authors summarize the current treatment of occipital neuralgia.

Full access

Stephanie Chen, Brandon Gaynor, and Allan D. Levi

Pudendal nerve schwannomas are very rare, with only two cases reported in the English-language literature. The surgical approaches described in these two case reports are the transgluteal approach and the laparoscopic approach. The authors present the case of a patient with progressive pelvic pain radiating ipsilaterally into her groin, vagina, and rectum, who was subsequently found to have a pudendal schwannoma. The authors used a transischiorectal fossa approach and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring and successfully excised the tumor. This approach has the advantage of direct access to Alcock's canal with minimal disruption of the pelvic muscles and ligaments. The patient experienced complete relief of her pelvic pain after the procedure.

Free access

Michael Y. Wang, Gabriel Widi, and Allan D. Levi

OBJECT

The aging of the population will require that surgeons increasingly consider operating on elderly patients. Performing surgery safely in the elderly will require an understanding of the factors that predict successful outcomes and avoid complications.

METHODS

Records of patients 85 years and older undergoing elective lumbar spinal surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Microdiscectomies were excluded. Preexisting medical illnesses measured using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status class, age, and surgical parameters were analyzed as factors potentially predictive of complications. Ambulatory function was rated on a 4-point scale.

RESULTS

During the study 26 consecutive patients (mean age 87 years) with a mean ASA class of 2.6 ± 0.65 and CCI of 1.1 ± 1.27 were enrolled. The average number of levels treated was 2.17 ± 1.23, and 73% underwent fusion. The mean follow-up was 41.9 months with a minimum of 24 months, and all patients were alive at last follow-up. Average blood loss was 142 ± 184 ml, and the operative time was 183.3 ± 80.6 minutes. The mean number of levels treated was 2.17 ± 1.13 (range 1–4). Ambulatory function improved significantly by 0.59 ± 1.0 points. Five complications (19.2%) occurred in 4 patients, 2 major and 3 minor. Four complications were temporary and 1 was permanent. Patient age, blood loss, CCI score, ASA class, the number of levels treated, and fusion surgery were not statistically associated with a complication. Operative time of longer than 180 minutes (p = 0.0134) was associated with complications.

CONCLUSIONS

Lumbar spine surgery in patients 85 years and older can be accomplished safely if careful attention is paid to preoperative selection. Prolonged operative times are associated with a higher risk of complications.

Full access

Laura Bloom, S. Shelby Burks, and Allan D. Levi

Postoperative wound infections in spinal surgery remain an important complication to diagnose and treat successfully. In most cases of deep infection, even with instrumentation, aggressive soft-tissue debridement followed by intravenous antibiotics is sufficient. This report presents a patient who underwent L3–S1 laminectomy and pedicle screw placement including bicortical sacral screws. This patient went on to develop multiple (7) recurrent infections at the operative site over a 5-year period. Continued investigation eventually revealed a large presacral abscess, which remained the source of recurrent bacterial seeding via the remaining bone tracts of the bicortical sacral screws placed during the original lumbar surgery. Two years after drainage of this presacral collection via a retroperitoneal approach, the patient remains symptom free.

Restricted access

Robert J. Rothrock, Victor M. Lu, and Allan D. Levi

OBJECTIVE

Syringomyelia is a debilitating, progressive disease process that can lead to loss of neurological function in patients already experiencing significant compromise. Syringosubarachnoid, syringoperitoneal, and syringopleural shunts are accepted treatment options for patients with persistent syringomyelia, but direct comparisons have been lacking to date. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis to compare clinical outcomes between these three syrinx shunt modalities.

METHODS

Utilizing PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines for systematic reviews, Ovid Embase, PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, American College of Physicians Journal Club, and Database of Abstracts of Review of Effectiveness were searched to identify all potentially relevant studies published from inception until July 2020. Data were extracted and analyzed using meta-analysis of proportions. The primary study outcome was the rate of reoperation based on the initial shunt modality. Secondary outcomes included clinical improvement, clinical deterioration, and complications following shunt placement.

RESULTS

A total of 22 articles describing 27 distinct treatment cohorts published between 1984 and 2019 satisfied the inclusion criteria. This captured 473 syrinx shunt procedures, 193 (41%) by syringosubarachnoid shunt, 153 (32%) by syringoperitoneal shunt, and 127 (27%) by syringopleural shunt, with an overall median clinical follow-up of 44 months. The pooled incidences of revision surgery were estimated as 13% for syringosubarachnoid, 28% for syringoperitoneal, and 10% for syringopleural shunts, respectively (p-interaction = 0.27). The rate of clinical improvement was estimated as 61% for syringosubarachnoid, 64% for syringoperitoneal, and 71% for syringopleural shunts. The rate of clinical deterioration following placement was estimated as 13% for syringosubarachnoid, 13% for syringoperitoneal, and 10% for syringopleural shunts.

CONCLUSIONS

The preferred modality of syrinx shunting remains a controversial topic for symptomatic syringomyelia. This study suggests that while all three modalities offer similar rates of clinical improvement and deterioration after placement, syringoperitoneal shunts have a greater rate of malfunction requiring surgical revision. These data also suggest that syringopleural shunts may offer the best rate of clinical improvement with the lowest rate of reoperation.

Full access

Karthik Madhavan, Lee Onn Chieng, Brandon G. Gaynor, and Allan D. Levi

Retro-odontoid cysts that arise from the tectorial membrane are uncommon lesions that can occur in elderly patients. They arise secondary to degenerative changes, including calcium pyrophosphate deposition within the ligaments. Surgical treatment is indicated when these lesions result in intractable pain, instability, and/or myelopathy. Several surgical techniques to treat this condition exist, but the optimal approach in elderly patients with comorbidities remains controversial. Here, the authors present a case series of 3 patients who underwent successful resection of a retro-odontoid lesion performed through a transdural approach.

The patients were 70, 81, and 74 years old and presented with symptoms of cervical myelopathy. In consideration of their advanced age and the location of their lesion, resection via a posterior approach was considered. A 1- to 2-cm suboccipital craniectomy and C-1 and partial C-2 laminectomy were performed. These lesions could not be accessed via an extradural posterolateral approach, and so a transdural approach was performed. In the first 2 patients, a preexisting deformity prompted an instrumented fusion. In the third patient, only a lesion resection was performed. In each case, the dural opening was made using a paramedian ipsilateral-sided incision, and the lesion was resected through an incision in the anterior dura mater. Only the posterior dura was closed primarily. MR imaging evidence of excellent spinal cord decompression was evident in follow-up examinations.

Transdural resection of retro-odontoid cysts is a viable option for treating asymmetrical ventral extradural cysts. Results from this case series suggest that such an approach is safe and feasible and can provide an alternative to open or endoscopic anterior transpharyngeal approaches.

Restricted access

Allan D. Levi and Jan M. Schwab

The corticospinal tract (CST) is the preeminent voluntary motor pathway that controls human movements. Consequently, long-standing interest has focused on CST location and function in order to understand both loss and recovery of neurological function after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury, such as traumatic central cord syndrome. The hallmark clinical finding is paresis of the hands and upper-extremity function with retention of lower-extremity movements, which has been attributed to injury and the sparing of specific CST fibers. In contrast to historical concepts that proposed somatotopic (laminar) CST organization, the current narrative summarizes the accumulated evidence that 1) there is no somatotopic organization of the corticospinal tract within the spinal cord in humans and 2) the CST is critically important for hand function. The evidence includes data from 1) tract-tracing studies of the central nervous system and in vivo MRI studies of both humans and nonhuman primates, 2) selective ablative studies of the CST in primates, 3) evolutionary assessments of the CST in mammals, and 4) neuropathological examinations of patients after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury involving the CST and prominent arm and hand dysfunction. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome is characterized by prominent upper-extremity dysfunction, which has been falsely predicated on pinpoint injury to an assumed CST layer that specifically innervates the hand muscles. Given the evidence surveyed herein, the pathophysiological mechanism is most likely related to diffuse injury to the CST that plays a critically important role in hand function.

Restricted access

Paul McMahon, Marina Dididze, and Allan D. Levi

Object

Incidental durotomies (IDs) are an unfortunate but anticipated potential complication of spinal surgery. The authors surveyed the frequency of IDs for a single spine surgeon and analyzed the major risk factors as well as the impact on long-term patient outcomes.

Methods

The authors conducted a prospective review of elective spinal surgeries performed over a 15-year period. Any surgery involving peripheral nerve only, intradural procedures, or dural tears due to trauma were excluded from analysis. The incidence of ID was categorized by surgery type including primary surgery, revision surgery, and so forth. Incidence of ID was also examined in the context of years of physician experience and training. Furthermore, the incidence and types of sequelae were examined in patients with an ID.

Results

Among 3000 elective spinal surgery cases, 3.5% (104) had an ID. The incidence of ID during minimally invasive procedures (3.3%) was similar, but no patients experienced long-term sequelae. The incidence of ID during revision surgery (6.5%) was higher. There was a marked difference in incidence between cervical (1.3%) and thoracolumbar (5.1%) cases. The incidence was lower for cases involving instrumentation (2.4%). When physician training was examined, residents were responsible for 49% of all IDs, whereas fellows were responsible for 26% and the attending for 25%. Among all of the cases that involved an ID, 7.7% of patients went on to experience a neurological deficit as compared with 1.5% of those without an ID. The overall failure rate of dural repair was 6.9%, and failure was almost 3 times higher (13%) in revision surgery as compared with a primary procedure (5%).

Conclusions

The authors established a reliable baseline incidence for durotomy after spine surgery: 3.5%. They also identified risk factors that can increase the likelihood of a durotomy, including location of the spinal procedure, type of procedure performed, and the implementation of a new procedure. The years of physician training or resident experience did not appear to be a major risk for ID.