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Moritz Scherer, Christine Jungk, Alexander Younsi, Philipp Kickingereder, Simon Müller, and Andreas Unterberg

OBJECTIVE

In this analysis, the authors sought to identify variables triggering an additional resection (AR) and determining residual intraoperative tumor volume in 1.5-T intraoperative MRI (iMRI)-guided glioma resections.

METHODS

A consecutive case series of 224 supratentorial glioma resections (WHO Grades I–IV) from a prospective iMRI registry (inclusion dates January 2011–April 2013) was examined with univariate and multiple regression models including volumetric data, tumor-related, and surgeon-related factors. The surgeon's expectation of an AR, in response to a questionnaire completed prior to iMRI, was evaluated using contingency analysis. A machine-learning prediction model was applied to consider if anticipation of intraoperative findings permits preoperative identification of ideal iMRI cases.

RESULTS

An AR was performed in 70% of cases after iMRI, but did not translate into an accumulated risk for neurological morbidity after surgery (p = 0.77 for deficits in cases with AR vs no AR). New severe persistent deficits occurred in 6.7% of patients. Initial tumor volume determined frequency of ARs and was independently correlated with larger tumor remnants delineated on iMRI (p < 0.0001). Larger iMRI volume was further associated with eloquent location (p = 0.010) and recurrent tumors (p < 0.0001), and with WHO grade (p = 0.0113). Greater surgical experience had no significant influence on the course of surgery. The surgeon's capability of ruling out an AR prior to iMRI turned out to incorporate guesswork (negative predictive value 43.6%). In a prediction model, AR could only be anticipated with 65% accuracy after integration of confounding variables.

CONCLUSIONS

Routine use of iMRI in glioma surgery is a safe and reliable method for resection guidance and is characterized by frequent ARs after scanning. Tumor-related factors were identified that influenced the course of surgery and intraoperative decision-making, and iMRI had a common value for surgeons of all experience levels. Commonly, the subjective intraoperative impression of the extent of resection had to be revised after iMRI review, which underscores the manifold potential of iMRI guidance. In combination with the failure to identify ideal iMRI cases preoperatively, this study supports a generous, tumor-oriented rather than surgeon-oriented indication for iMRI in glioma surgery.

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Lennart Riemann, Daphne C. Voormolen, Katrin Rauen, Klaus Zweckberger, Andreas Unterberg, Alexander Younsi, and the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) Investigators and Participants

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this paper was to evaluate the prevalence of postconcussive symptoms and their relation to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric and adolescent patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) who received head CT imaging during initial assessment.

METHODS

Patients aged between 5 and 21 years with mTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale scores 13–15) and available Rivermead Post Concussion Questionnaire (RPQ) at 6 months of follow-up in the multicenter, prospectively collected CENTER-TBI (Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in TBI) study were included. The prevalence of postconcussive symptoms was assessed, and the occurrence of postconcussive syndrome (PSC) based on the ICD-10 criteria, was analyzed. HRQOL was compared in patients with and without PCS using the Quality of Life after Brain Injury (QOLIBRI) questionnaire.

RESULTS

A total of 196 adolescent or pediatric mTBI patients requiring head CT imaging were included. High-energy trauma was prevalent in more than half of cases (54%), abnormalities on head CT scans were detected in 41%, and admission to the regular ward or intensive care unit was necessary in 78%. Six months postinjury, 36% of included patients had experienced at least one moderate or severe symptom on the RPQ. PCS was present in 13% of adolescents and children when considering symptoms of at least moderate severity, and those patients had significantly lower QOLIBRI total scores, indicating lower HRQOL, compared with young patients without PCS (57 vs 83 points, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Adolescent and pediatric mTBI patients requiring head CT imaging show signs of increased trauma severity. Postconcussive symptoms are present in up to one-third of those patients, and PCS can be diagnosed in 13% 6 months after injury. Moreover, PCS is significantly associated with decreased HRQOL.