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Alexander Spiessberger, Deborah R. Vogt, Javier Fandino and Serge Marbacher

OBJECTIVE

Incidence rates of de novo aneurysm formation and recurrence after clip ligation remain controversial. In this meta-analysis, the authors provide data on pooled annual incidence rates and the association of patient characteristics with time to formation of de novo aneurysms and time to recurrence after clipping.

METHODS

A search of the literature up to June 15, 2016, on PubMed and a systematic review were performed. The association of age, aneurysm rupture status, aneurysm multiplicity, and anatomical location with time to recurrence or formation of de novo aneurysm was estimated using multivariable Cox proportional-hazards models. Kaplan-Meier estimates (event-free survival curves) are shown. Pooled annualized incidence rates of recurrent and de novo aneurysms were estimated using Poisson regression. Proportions of aneurysms and average follow-up times are displayed as bubble plots with LOESS smoothers weighted for study size.

RESULTS

Of the 7606 articles screened, 92 were included in the study. Case reports on 101 patients with recurrent aneurysms and 132 patients with de novo aneurysms were analyzed. Long-term follow-up studies on de novo aneurysm formation included 13,723 patients with 101,378 patient-years of follow-up; studies on aneurysm recurrence included 5922 patients with 31,055 patient-years of follow-up. Mean time to recurrence was 12.9 ± 6.6 years (mean ± standard deviation), and mean time to de novo formation was 9.3 ± 6.1 years. No association with sex, aneurysm location, and initial rupture could be shown. De novo aneurysms occurred later in patients with multiplicity of aneurysms at diagnosis (HR 0.63, p = 0.03) and in patients with increasing age (HR per 10 yrs 0.88, p = 0.06). Pooled annualized incidence rates were 0.35% for de novo aneurysms and 0.13% for recurrent aneurysms.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite low reported annual incidence rates, the cumulative risk of 9.6%–22% for aneurysm recurrence or de novo formation 20 years after clip ligation warrants lifelong follow-up. Screening at 5, 10, and 20 years would detect 30.8% (95% CI 23.3%–37.6%), 64.2% (95% CI 55.9%–70.9%), and 95.9% (95% CI 90.9%–97.9%) of de novo aneurysms. Screening for recurrent aneurysms at 10, 15, and 20 years would detect 36.6% (95% CI 26.5%–45.4%), 65.3% (95% CI 54.7%–73.5%), and 95.1% (95% CI 85.8%–96.6%) of lesions.

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Alexander Spiessberger, Fabio Strange, Basil Erwin Gruter, Stefan Wanderer, Daniela Casoni, Philipp Gruber, Michael Diepers, Luca Remonda, Javier Fandino, Javier Añon and Serge Marbacher

OBJECTIVE

Temporary parent vessel occlusion performed to establish a high-flow interpositional bypass carries the risk of infarcts. The authors investigated the feasibility of a novel technique to establish a high-flow bypass without temporary parent vessel occlusion in order to lower the risk of ischemic complications.

METHODS

In 10 New Zealand white rabbits, a carotid artery side-to-end anastomosis was performed under parent artery patency with a novel endovascular balloon device. Intraoperative angiography, postoperative neurological assessments, and postoperative MRI/MRA were performed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the novel technique.

RESULTS

A patent anastomosis was established in 10 of 10 animals; 3 procedure-related complications occurred. No postoperative focal neurological deficits were observed. The MRI/MRA findings include no infarcts and bypass patency in 50% of the animals.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors demonstrated the feasibility of an endovascular assisted, nonocclusive high-flow bypass. Future refinement of the device and technique in an animal model is necessary to lower the complication rate and increase patency rates.