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Justin Schwarz, Joseph A. Carnevale, Jacob L. Goldberg, Alexander D. Ramos, Thomas W. Link, and Jared Knopman

OBJECTIVE

Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a common and challenging pathology to treat due to both the historically high recurrence rate following surgical evacuation and the medical comorbidities inherent in the aging patient population that it primarily affects. Middle meningeal artery (MMA) embolization has shown promise in the treatment of cSDHs, most convincingly to avoid surgical evacuation in relatively asymptomatic patients. Symptomatic patients requiring surgical evacuation may also benefit from perioperative MMA embolization to prevent cSDH recurrence. The goal of this study was to determine the utility of perioperative MMA embolization for symptomatic cSDH requiring surgical evacuation and to assess if there is a decrease in the cSDH recurrence rate compared to historical recurrence rates following surgical evacuation alone.

METHODS

Symptomatic cSDHs were evacuated using a subdural evacuating port system (SEPS) with 5-mm twist-drill craniostomy in an intensive care unit or by performing a craniotomy in the operating room, using either a small (silver dollar, < 4 cm) or large (≥ 4 cm) craniotomy. MMA embolization was performed perioperatively using angiography, selective catheterization of the MMA, and infusion of polyvinyl particles. Outcomes were assessed clinically and radiographically with interval head CT imaging.

RESULTS

There were 44 symptomatic cSDHs in 41 patients, with 3 patients presenting with bilateral symptomatic cSDH. All cSDHs were evacuated using an SEPS (n = 18), a silver-dollar craniotomy (n = 16), or a large craniotomy (n = 10). Prophylactic MMA embolization was performed successfully in all cSDHs soon after surgical evacuation. There were no deaths and no procedural complications. There was an overall reduction of greater than 50% or resolution of cSDH in 40/44 (90.9%) cases, regardless of the evacuation procedure used. Of the 44 prophylactic cases, there were 2 (4.5%) cases of cSDH recurrence that required repeat surgical evacuation at the 1-year follow-up. These 2 cSDHs were initially evacuated using an SEPS and subsequently required a craniotomy, thereby representing an overall 4.5% recurrence rate of treated cSDH requiring repeat evacuation. Most notably, of the 26 patients who underwent surgical evacuation with a craniotomy followed by MMA embolization, none had cSDH recurrence requiring repeat intervention.

CONCLUSIONS

Perioperative prophylactic MMA embolization in the setting of surgical evacuation, via either craniotomy or SEPS, may help to lower the recurrence rate of cSDH.

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Evan D. Bander, Alexander D. Ramos, Eva Wembacher-Schroeder, Iryna Ivasyk, Rowena Thomson, Peter F. Morgenstern, and Mark M. Souweidane

OBJECTIVE

While the safety and efficacy of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) have been studied in patients receiving single-dose drug infusions, agents for oncological therapy may require repeated or chronic infusions to maintain therapeutic drug concentrations. Repeat and chronic CED infusions have rarely been described for oncological purposes. Currently available CED devices are not approved for extended indwelling use, and the only potential at this time is for sequential treatments through multiple procedures. The authors report on the safety and experience in a group of pediatric patients who received sequential CED into the brainstem for the treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

METHODS

Patients in this study were enrolled in a phase I single-center clinical trial using 124I-8H9 monoclonal antibody (124I-omburtamab) administered by CED (clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01502917). A retrospective chart and imaging review were used to assess demographic data, CED infusion data, and postoperative neurological and surgical outcomes. MRI scans were analyzed using iPlan Flow software for volumetric measurements. Target and catheter coordinates as well as radial, depth, and absolute error in MRI space were calculated with the ClearPoint imaging software.

RESULTS

Seven patients underwent 2 or more sequential CED infusions. No patients experienced Clinical Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3 or greater deficits. One patient had a persistent grade 2 cranial nerve deficit after a second infusion. No patient experienced hemorrhage or stroke postoperatively. There was a statistically significant decrease in radial error (p = 0.005) and absolute tip error (p = 0.008) for the second infusion compared with the initial infusion. Sequential infusions did not result in significantly different distribution capacities between the first and second infusions (volume of distribution determined by the PET signal/volume of infusion ratio [mean ± SD]: 2.66 ± 0.35 vs 2.42 ± 0.75; p = 0.45).

CONCLUSIONS

This series demonstrates the ability to safely perform sequential CED infusions into the pediatric brainstem. Past treatments did not negatively influence the procedural workflow, technical application of the targeting interface, or distribution capacity. This limited experience provides a foundation for using repeat CED for oncological purposes.