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Azam A. Qureshi, Jennifer J. Cheng, Abraham N. Sunshine, Adela Wu, Gregory M. Pontone, Nicola Cascella, Frederick A. Lenz, Stephen E. Grill and William S. Anderson

OBJECT

Cases of postoperative psychosis in Parkinson’s disease patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment have previously been published. However, the magnitude of symptom incidence and the clinical risk factors are currently unknown. This retrospective study sheds light on these issues by investigating psychosis in a group of 128 Parkinson’s disease patients who received DBS implants.

METHODS

A retrospective chart review was performed to obtain surgery dates, follow-up clinic visit dates, and associated stimulation parameter settings (contacts in use and the polarity of each along with stimulation voltage, frequency, and pulse width) for each patient. Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale II Thought Disorder scores, used as a clinical assessment tool to evaluate the presence of psychosis at each visit, were also collected. The data were compiled into a database and analyzed.

RESULTS

The lifetime incidence of psychosis in this cohort of patients was 28.1%. The data suggest that risk of psychosis remains fairly constant throughout the first 5 years after implantation of a DBS system and that patients older at the time of receiving the first DBS implant are not only more likely to develop psychosis, but also to develop symptoms sooner than their younger counterparts. Further analysis provides evidence that psychosis is largely independent of the clinically used electrode contact and of stimulation parameters prior to psychosis onset.

CONCLUSIONS

Although symptoms of psychosis are widely seen in patients with Parkinson’s disease in the years following stimulator placement, results of the present suggest that most psychoses occurring postoperatively are likely independent of implantation and stimulation settings.

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Kevin M. Stanko, Young M. Lee, Jennifer Rios, Adela Wu, Giovanna W. Sobrinho, Jon D. Weingart, Eric M. Jackson, Edward S. Ahn, Kaisorn L. Chaichana and George I. Jallo

OBJECT

Chiari Type I malformation involves caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils below the foramen magnum, which obstructs normal cerebrospinal fluid flow and increases intracranial pressure. Certain aspects of its surgical treatment remain controversial. A retrospective study was conducted to assess the efficacy of tonsillar cautery on syrinx resolution among pediatric Chiari patients undergoing cervicomedullary decompression.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort study was performed for patients 0–18 years of age who underwent surgical correction for Chiari Type I malformation with syrinx between 1995 and 2013. Basic demographic information was collected as well as data for preoperative symptoms, prior surgical history, perioperative characteristics, and postsurgical outcomes. Descriptive statistics were performed in addition to bivariate analyses. Candidate predictor variables were identified based on an association with tonsillar cautery with p < 0.10. Forward stepwise likelihood ratio was used to select candidate predictors in a binary logistic regression model (Pin = 0.05, Pout = 0.10) most strongly associated with the outcome.

RESULTS

A total of 171 patients with Chiari Type I malformation with syrinx were identified, and 43 underwent tonsillar cautery. Patients who underwent tonsillar cautery had 6.11 times greater odds of improvement in their syrinx (95% CI 2.57–14.49, p < 0.001). There was no effect of tonsillar cautery on increased perioperative complications as well as the need for repeat decompressions.

CONCLUSIONS

Tonsillar cautery is safe and effective in the treatment of Chiari Type I malformation with syrinx and may decrease time to syrinx resolution after cervicomedullary decompression. Tonsillar cautery does not increase postoperative complications in pediatric Chiari Type I malformation patients.

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Timothy Y. Kim, Christopher M. Jackson, Yuanxuan Xia, Leila A. Mashouf, Kisha K. Patel, Eileen S. Kim, Alice L. Hung, Adela Wu, Tomas Garzon-Muvdi, Matthew T. Bender, Chetan Bettegowda, John Y. K. Lee and Michael Lim

OBJECTIVE

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a neuropathic pain disorder characterized by severe, lancinating facial pain that is commonly treated with neuropathic medication, percutaneous rhizotomy, and/or microvascular decompression (MVD). Patients who are not found to have distinct arterial compression during MVD present a management challenge. In 2013, the authors reported on a small case series of such patients in whom glycerin was injected intraoperatively into the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve. The objective of the authors’ present study was to report their updated experience with this technique to further validate this novel approach.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of data obtained in patients in whom glycerin was directly injected into the inferior third of the cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve. Seventy-four patients, including 14 patients from the authors’ prior study, were identified, and demographic information, intraoperative findings, postoperative course, and complications were recorded. Fisher’s exact test, unpaired t-tests, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves using Mantel log-rank test were used to compare the 74 patients with a cohort of 476 patients who received standard MVD by the same surgeon.

RESULTS

The 74 patients who underwent MVD and glycerin injection had an average follow-up of 19.1 ± 18.0 months, and the male/female ratio was 1:2.9. In 33 patients (44.6%), a previous intervention for TN had failed. On average, patients had an improvement in the Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity score from 4.1 ± 0.4 before surgery to 2.1 ± 1.2 after surgery. Pain improvement after the surgery was documented in 95.9% of patients. Thirteen patients (17.6%) developed burning pain following surgery. Five patients developed complications (6.7%), including incisional infection, facial palsy, CSF leak, and hearing deficit, all of which were minor.

CONCLUSIONS

Intraoperative injection of glycerin into the trigeminal nerve is a generally safe and potentially effective treatment for TN when no distinct site of arterial compression is identified during surgery or when decompression of the nerve is deemed to be inadequate.