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  • Author or Editor: Abdulrahman Y. Alturki x
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Raghav Gupta, Christopher S. Ogilvy, Justin M. Moore, Christoph J. Griessenauer, Alejandro Enriquez-Marulanda, Madeline Leadon, Nimer Adeeb, Luis Ascanio, Georgios A. Maragkos, Abhi Jain, Philip G. R. Schmalz, Abdulrahman Y. Alturki, Kimberly Kicielinski, Clemens M. Schirmer and Ajith J. Thomas

OBJECTIVE

There is currently no standardized follow-up imaging strategy for intracranial aneurysms treated with the Pipeline embolization device (PED). Here, the authors use follow-up imaging data for aneurysms treated with the PED to propose a standardizable follow-up imaging strategy.

METHODS

A retrospective review of all patients who underwent treatment for ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms with the PED between March 2013 and March 2017 at 2 major academic institutions in the US was performed.

RESULTS

A total of 218 patients underwent treatment for 259 aneurysms with the PED and had undergone at least 1 follow-up imaging session to assess aneurysm occlusion status. There were 235 (90.7%) anterior and 24 posterior (9.3%) circulation aneurysms. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, the cumulative incidences of aneurysm occlusion at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months were 38.2%, 77.8%, 84.2%, and 85.1%, respectively. No differences in the cumulative incidence of aneurysm occlusion according to aneurysm location (p = 0.39) or aneurysm size (p = 0.81) were observed. A trend toward a decreased cumulative incidence of aneurysm occlusion in patients 70 years or older was observed (p = 0.088). No instances of aneurysm rupture after PED treatment or aneurysm recurrence after occlusion were noted. Sixteen (6.2%) aneurysms were re-treated with the PED; 11 of these had imaging follow-up data available, demonstrating occlusion in 3 (27.3%).

CONCLUSIONS

The authors propose a follow-up imaging strategy that incorporates 12-month digital subtraction angiography and 24-month MRA for patients younger than 70 years and single-session digital subtraction angiography at 12 months in patients 70 years or older. For recurrent or persistent aneurysms, re-treatment with the PED or use of an alternative treatment modality may be considered.

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Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi, Ron L. Alterman, Martina Stippler, Kevin Phan, Abdulrahman Y. Alturki, Efstathios Papavassiliou, Ekkehard M. Kasper, Jeffrey Arle, Christopher S. Ogilvy and Ajith J. Thomas

OBJECTIVE

Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has a variety of clinical presentations, including hemiparesis. Hemiparesis is of the utmost importance because it is one of the major indications for surgical intervention and influences outcome. In the current study, the authors intended to identify factors influencing the presence of hemiparesis in CSDH patients and to determine the threshold value of hematoma thickness and midline shift for development of hemiparesis.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed 325 patients (266 with unilateral and 59 with bilateral hematomas) with CSDH who underwent surgical evacuation, regardless of presence or absence of hemiparesis.

RESULTS

In univariate analysis, hematoma loculation, age, hematoma maximal thickness, and midline shift were significantly associated with hemiparesis. Moreover, patients with unilateral hematomas had a higher rate of hemiparesis than patients with bilateral hematomas. Sex, trauma history, anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use, presence of comorbidities, Glasgow Coma Scale score, hematoma density characteristics on CT scan, and hematoma signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MRI were not associated with hemiparesis. In multivariate analysis, the presence of loculation and hematoma laterality (unilateral vs bilateral) influenced hemiparesis. For unilateral hematomas, maximal hematoma thickness of 19.8 mm and midline shift of 6.4 mm were associated with a 50% probability of hemiparesis. For bilateral hematomas, 29.0 mm of maximal hematoma thickness and 6.8 mm of shift were associated with a 50% probability of hemiparesis.

CONCLUSIONS

Presence of loculations, unilateral hematomas, older patient age, hematoma maximal thickness, and midline shift were associated with a higher rate of hemiparesis in CSDH patients. Moreover, 19.8 mm of hematoma thickness and 6.4 mm of midline shift were associated with a 50% probability of hemiparesis in patients with unilateral hematomas.

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Kathryn M. Wagner, Visish M. Srinivasan, Aditya Srivatsan, Michael G. Z. Ghali, Ajith J. Thomas, Alejandro Enriquez-Marulanda, Abdulrahman Y. Alturki, Christopher S. Ogilvy, Maxim Mokin, Anna L. Kuhn, Ajit Puri, Ramesh Grandhi, Stephen Chen, Jeremiah Johnson and Peter Kan

OBJECTIVE

With the increasing use of flow diversion as treatment for intracranial aneurysms, there is a concomitant increased vigilance in monitoring complications. The low porosity of flow diverters is concerning when the origins of vessels are covered, whether large circle of Willis branches or critical perforators. In this study, the authors report their experience with flow diverter coverage of the lenticulostriate vessels and evaluate their safety and outcomes.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed 5 institutional databases of all flow diversion cases from August 2012 to June 2018. Information regarding patient presentation, aneurysm location, treatment, and outcomes were recorded. Patients who were treated with flow diverters placed in the proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA), proximal anterior cerebral artery, or distal internal carotid artery leading to coverage of the medial and lateral lenticulostriate vessels were included. Clinical outcomes according to the modified Rankin Scale were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to establish risk factors for lenticulostriate infarct.

RESULTS

Fifty-two patients were included in the analysis. Postprocedure cross-sectional images were available in 30 patients. Two patients experienced transient occlusion of the MCA during the procedure; one was asymptomatic, and the other had a clinical and radiographic ipsilateral internal capsule stroke. Five patients had transient symptoms without radiographic infarct in the lenticulostriate territory. Two patients experienced in-stent thrombosis, leading to clinical MCA infarcts (one in the ipsilateral caudate) after discontinuing antiplatelet therapy. Discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy prior to 6 months was the only variable that was significantly correlated with stroke outcome (p < 0.01, OR 0.3, 95% CI 0–0.43), and this significance persisted when controlled for other risk factors, including age, smoking status, and aneurysm location.

CONCLUSIONS

The use and versatility of flow diversion is increasing, and safety data are continuing to accumulate. Here, the authors provide early data on the safety of covering lenticulostriate vessels with flow diverters. The authors concluded that the coverage of these perforators does not routinely lead to clinically significant ischemia when dual antiplatelet therapy is continued for 6 months. Further evaluation is needed in larger cohorts and with imaging follow-up as experience develops in using these devices in more distal circulation.

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Luis C. Ascanio, Raghav Gupta, Nimer Adeeb, Justin M. Moore, Christoph J. Griessenauer, Julie Mayeku, Yaw Tachie-Baffour, Ranjit Thomas, Abdulrahman Y. Alturki, Philip G. R. Schmalz, Christopher S. Ogilvy and Ajith J. Thomas

OBJECTIVE

Currently, there is no established standard regarding the ideal number of external ventricular drain (EVD) clamp trials performed before ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion following nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this study, the authors aimed to evaluate this relationship.

METHODS

A retrospective review of all patients presenting with SAH between July 2007 and December 2016 was performed. Patients with SAH who had received an EVD within the first 24 hours of hospital admission and had undergone at least 1 clamp trial prior to EVD removal were eligible for inclusion in the study. Patient demographics, clinical presentations, SAH etiologies and grades, clamp trial data, hospital lengths of stay, and functional outcomes were recorded.

RESULTS

One hundred fourteen patients with nontraumatic SAH complicated by posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus were included in the study. The median patient age was 57 years (range 28–90 years), with a male/female ratio of 1:1.7. A ruptured aneurysm was the underlying etiology of SAH in 79.8% of patients. A majority of patients (69.4%) had a Hunt and Hess grade III–V on admission. The median number of clamp trials performed was 2 (range 1–6). A VP shunt was required in 40.4% of patients. In those who underwent 2 and 3 clamp trials, 60% and 38.9%, respectively, did not require subsequent VP shunt placement.

CONCLUSIONS

Surgical placement of a VP shunt is associated with complications. Clamp trials are routinely performed before making the decision to insert a shunt. In the present study, the authors found that a significant percentage of patients passed their second and third clamp trials without requiring subsequent shunt insertion. These data support performing multiple clamp trials prior to shunt placement.