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  • Author or Editor: Abdelkader Taibah x
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Maurizio Falcioni, Paolo Fois, Abdelkader Taibah and Mario Sanna

Object

The object of this study was to evaluate long-term postoperative facial nerve (FN) function in patients undergoing vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical course of patients affected by isolated VSs with normal preoperative FN function, with no previous surgical or radiotherapeutic treatment, and who underwent surgery between 1987 and 2007. Facial nerve function was clinically evaluated according to the House-Brackmann (HB) scale. The minimum postoperative follow-up was 12 months.

Results

Among the 1550 patients surgically treated at the authors' center, 1151 matched inclusion criteria for the present study. The FN was anatomically interrupted in 48 cases (4.2%), and 51 patients (4.4%) underwent subtotal tumor removal and were considered separately. Among the 1052 patients with anatomically preserved FNs and total tumor removal, 684 (65%) enjoyed postoperative HB Grade I or II and 309 (29.4%) enjoyed Grade III, with the remaining 59 cases (5.6%) suffering unsatisfactory results (HB Grades IV–VI). As expected, FN function results deteriorated in cases of larger tumors.

Conclusions

The main factor influencing postoperative FN function was tumor size. Although there was a progressive deterioration in FN function outcome in relation to tumor size, a cutoff point between satisfactory and unsatisfactory results could be identified at around 2 cm in maximum extrameatal tumor diameter, with the “optimal size” for surgery identified at < 1 cm. This finding emphasizes the importance of an early diagnosis and should be kept in mind when selecting the correct timing for VS removal. For small lesions, the results following a middle cranial fossa approach were significantly worse as compared with those following the translabyrinthine and retrosigmoidretrolabyrinthine approaches.

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Sampath Chandra Prasad, Karthikeyan Balasubramanian, Enrico Piccirillo, Abdelkader Taibah, Alessandra Russo, Jingchun He and Mario Sanna

OBJECTIVE

The aim in this study was to review the technique and outcomes of cable graft interpositioning of the facial nerve (FN) in lateral skull base surgeries.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively evaluated data from patients who had undergone cable graft interpositioning after nerve sacrifice during skull base tumor removal between June 1987 and May 2015. All patients had undergone lateral skull base approaches to remove tumors at a quaternary referral center in Italy. Facial nerve function was evaluated before and after surgery using the House-Brackmann (HB) grading system.

RESULTS

Two hundred thirteen patients were eligible for study. The mean follow-up was 44.3 months. The most common pathology was vestibular schwannoma (83 cases [39%]), followed by FN tumor (67 cases [31%]). Facial nerve tumors had the highest incidence of nerve interruption (67 [66%] of 102 cases). Preoperative FN function was normal (HB Grade I) in 105 patients (49.3%) and mild (HB Grade II) in 19 (8.9%). At the last postoperative follow-up, 108 (50.7%) of the 213 patients had recovered to Grade III nerve function. Preoperative HB grading of the FN was found to have a significant effect on outcome (p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS

Cable graft interpositioning is a convenient and well-accepted procedure for immediate restoration of the FN. The study results, over a large number of patients, showed that the stitch-less fibrin glue–aided coaptation technique yields good results. The best possible postoperative result achieved was an HB Grade III. The chances of a good postoperative result increase when FN function is normal preoperatively. Slow-growing tumors of the cerebellopontine angle had a favorable outcome after grafting.

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Zhengnong Chen, Sampath Chandra Prasad, Filippo Di Lella, Marimar Medina, Enrico Piccirillo, Abdelkader Taibah, Alessandra Russo, Shankai Yin and Mario Sanna

Object

The authors evaluated the behavior of residual tumors and facial nerve outcomes after incomplete excision of vestibular schwannomas (VSs).

Methods

The case records of all patients who underwent surgical treatment of VSs were analyzed. All patients in whom an incomplete excision had been performed were analyzed. Incomplete excision was defined as near-total resection (NTR), subtotal resection (STR), and partial resection (PR). Tumors in the NTR and STR categories were followed up with a wait-and-rescan approach, whereas the tumors in the PR category were subjected to a second-stage surgery and were excluded from this series. All patients included in the study underwent baseline MRI at the 3rd and 12th postoperative months, and repeat imaging was subsequently performed every year for 7–10 years postoperatively or as indicated clinically. Preoperative and postoperative facial function was noted.

Results

Of the 2368 patients who underwent surgery for VS, 111 patients who had incomplete excisions of VSs were included in the study. Of these patients, 73 (65.77%) had undergone NTR and 38 (34.23%) had undergone STR. Of the VSs, 62 (55.86%) were cystic and 44 (70.97%) of these cystic VSs underwent NTR. The residual tumor was left behind on the facial nerve alone in 62 patients (55.86%), on the facial nerve and vessels in 2 patients (1.80%), on the facial nerve and brainstem in 15 patients (13.51%), and on the brainstem alone in 25 patients (22.52%). In the 105 patients with normal preoperative facial nerve function, postoperative facial nerve function was House-Brackmann (HB) Grades I and II in 51 patients (48.57%), HB Grade III in 34 patients (32.38%), and HB Grades IV–VI in 20 patients (19.05%). Seven patients (6.3%) showed evidence of tumor regrowth on follow-up MRI. All 7 patients (100%) who showed evidence of tumor regrowth had undergone STR. No patient in the NTR group exhibited regrowth. The Kaplan-Meier plot demonstrated a 5-year tumor regrowth-free survival of 92%, with a mean disease-free interval of 140 months (95% CI 127–151 months). The follow-up period ranged from 12 to 156 months (mean 45.4 months).

Conclusions

The authors' report and review of the literature show that there is undoubtedly merit for NTR and STR for preservation of the facial nerve. On the basis of this they propose an algorithm for the management of incomplete VS excisions. Patients who undergo incomplete excisions must be subjected to follow-up MRI for a period of at least 7–10 years. When compared with STR, NTR via an enlarged translabyrinthine approach has shown to have a lower rate of regrowth of residual tumor, while having almost the same result in terms of facial nerve function.