Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Aaron Bond x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Aaron E. Bond and W. Jeffrey Elias

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to improve the predictability of lesion size during focused ultrasound (FUS) thalamotomy procedures.

METHODS

Treatment profiles and T2-weighted MRI (T2 MRI) studies obtained in 63 patients who participated in 3 clinical trials of FUS thalamotomy from February 2011 to March 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Four damage estimate models were compared with lesion sizes measured on postprocedural T2 MRI. Models were based on 54°C × 3 seconds, 240 cumulative equivalent minutes at 43°C, and simple thermal threshold analysis, which recorded the maximum diameter that reached a temperature of at least 51°C and 54°C. Energy requirements per °C thermal rise above 37°C were also recorded.

RESULTS

Lesion diameters from T2 MRI correlated poorly from the day of the procedure to day 1 postprocedure (mean increase 78% [SD 79%]). There was more predictability of lesion size from day 1 to day 30, with a mean reduction in lesion diameter of 11% (SD 24%). Of the 4 models tested, the most correlative model to day 1 findings on T2 MRI was a 51°C threshold. The authors observed an increase in the energy requirement for each subsequent treatment sonication, with the largest percentage increase from treatment sonication 1 to treatment sonication 2 (mean increase 20% in energy required per °C increase in temperature above 37°C).

CONCLUSIONS

At the margins, 51°C temperature threshold diameters correlated best to lesion diameters measured at day 1 with T2 MRI. The lesion size from T2 MRI decreases from day 1 to day 30 in a predictable manner, much more so than from the day of the procedure to day 1 postprocedure. Energy requirements per °C rise above 37°C continuously increase with each successive sonication.

Full access

Aaron E. Bond, John A. Jane Sr., Kenneth C. Liu and Edward H. Oldfield

OBJECT

The authors completed a prospective, institutional review board–approved study using intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in patients undergoing posterior fossa decompression (PFD) for Chiari I malformation. The purpose of the study was to examine the utility of iMRI in determining when an adequate decompression had been performed.

METHODS

Patients with symptomatic Chiari I malformations with imaging findings of obstruction of the CSF space at the foramen magnum, with or without syringomyelia, were considered candidates for surgery. All patients underwent complete T1, T2, and cine MRI studies in the supine position preoperatively as a baseline. After the patient was placed prone with the neck flexed in position for surgery, iMRI was performed. The patient then underwent a bone decompression of the foramen magnum and arch of C-1, and the MRI was repeated. If obstruction was still present, then in a stepwise fashion the patient underwent dural splitting, duraplasty, and coagulation of the tonsils, with an iMRI study performed after each step guiding the decision to proceed further.

RESULTS

Eighteen patients underwent PFD for Chiari I malformations between November 2011 and February 2013; 15 prone preincision iMRIs were performed. Fourteen of these patients (93%) demonstrated significant improvement of CSF flow through the foramen magnum dorsal to the tonsils with positioning only. This improvement was so notable that changes in CSF flow as a result of the bone decompression were difficult to discern.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors observed significant CSF flow changes when simply positioning the patient for surgery. These results put into question intraoperative flow assessments that suggest adequate decompression by PFD, whether by iMRI or intraoperative ultrasound. The use of intraoperative imaging during PFD for Chiari I malformation, whether by ultrasound or iMRI, is limited by CSF flow dynamics across the foramen magnum that change significantly when the patient is positioned for surgery.

Full access

I. Jonathan Pomeraniec, Aaron E. Bond, M. Beatriz Lopes and John A. Jane Sr.

OBJECT

Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) remains most often a clinical diagnosis and has been widely considered responsive to the placement of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt. The high incidence of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with NPH symptoms leads to poorer outcomes than would be expected in patients with NPH alone. This article reviews a series of patients operated on for presumed NPH in whom preoperative high-volume lumbar puncture (HVLP) and intraoperative cortical brain biopsies were performed. The data derived from these procedures were then used to understand the incidence of AD in patients presenting with NPH symptoms and to analyze the efficacy of HVLP in patients with NPH and patients with concurrent AD (NPH+AD). A review of the outcomes of shunt surgery is provided.

METHODS

The cases of all patients who underwent placement of a CSF shunt for NPH from 1998 to 2013 at the University of Virginia by the senior author were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who underwent HVLP and patients who underwent cortical brain biopsies were stratified based on the biopsy results into an NPH-only group and an NPH+AD group. The HVLP results and outcomes were then compared in these 2 groups.

RESULTS

From 1998 to 2013, 142 patients underwent shunt operations because of a preoperative clinical diagnosis of NPH. Of the patients with a shunt who had a diagnosis of NPH, 105 (74%) received HVLPs. Of 142 shunt-treated patients with NPH, 27 (19%) were determined to have concomitant Alzheimer’s pathology based on histopathological findings at the time of shunting. Patients who underwent repeat biopsies had an initial positive outcome. After they clinically deteriorated, they underwent repeat biopsies during shunt interrogation, and 13% of the repeat biopsies demonstrated Alzheimer’s pathology. Improvements in gait and cognition did not reach significance between the NPH and NPH+AD groups. In total, 105 patients underwent HVLP before shunt placement. In the NPH cohort, 44.6% of patients experienced improvement in symptoms with HVLP and went on to experience resolution or improvement. In the NPH+AD cohort, this proportion was lower (18.2%), and the majority of patients who experienced symptomatic relief with HVLP actually went on to experience either no change or worsening of symptoms (p = 0.0136).

CONCLUSIONS

A high prevalence of AD histopathological findings (19%) occurred in patients treated with shunts for NPH based on cortical brain biopsies performed during placement of CSF shunts. HVLP results alone were not predictive of clinical outcome. However, cortical brain biopsy results and the presence of Alzheimer’s pathology had a strong correlation with success after CSF shunting. Thirteen percent of patients who initially had a normal cortical brain biopsy result had evidence of AD pathology on repeat biopsy, demonstrating the progressive nature of the disease.

Restricted access

Aaron E. Bond, Gabriel Zada, Ira Bowen, J. Gordon McComb and Mark D. Krieger

Object

The goal of this study was to review all cases of pediatric spinal arachnoid cysts (SACs) surgically treated at the authors' institution between 1992 and 2008 and to compare these cases to the published literature for the general population.

Methods

The charts of all pediatric patients with SACs were reviewed for demographics, medical history, presenting symptoms, imaging findings, operative procedure(s), complications, and outcomes. Following a complete literature review, the pediatric data were compared with data from the general population and unique findings associated with pediatric patients were identified.

Results

Thirty-one pediatric patients (median age 6.9 years) underwent operative intervention for SACs between 1992 and 2008 (median duration of follow-up 4.2 years). There were 17 female patients (55%) and 14 male patients (45%). Twenty-one patients (68%) presented with symptoms of radiculopathy or myelopathy. The most common presenting symptoms were pain (42%), lower-extremity weakness (39%), gait instability (32%), spasticity (19%), sensory loss (10%), and bladder dysfunction (7%). In 3 patients (10%) SACs were incidental findings. Intradural SACs were more common (18 patients, 58%) than extradural SACs (11 patients, 36%). One patient (3%) had extradural and intradural components. One patient (3%) had a purely intramedullary cyst, and 1 patient (3%) had both an intradural and intramedullary component. Of the 18 intradural SACs, 9 (50%) were located ventral to the spinal cord and 9 (50%) were dorsally situated. One dorsal intradural SAC had an intramedullary component. All extradural SACs were located dorsal to the spinal cord. Intradural SACs were primarily concentrated in the cervical and thoracic regions (67%), whereas extradural cysts were more evenly distributed between the thoracic, lumbar, and sacral regions. Of the 18 patients with intradural SACs, 13 (72%) had significant previous CNS abnormalities, compared with 3 (27%) of 11 patients with extradural SACs. There were 2 operative complications. One patient had a CSF leak treated with a lumbar drain, and the second patient had a pseudomeningocele. No patients had neurological deterioration as a result of surgical intervention. Twenty-one patients (68%) had complete remission of symptoms, 6 (19%) had improvement, 3 (10%) were stable, and 1 (3%) has worsening of symptoms with recurrence that ultimately required cystoperitoneal shunting, despite multiple failed attempts at fenestration.

Conclusions

Spinal arachnoid cysts are rare lesions in the pediatric population. Affected patients present with back pain, weakness, and/or gait instability. In children, SACs predominantly develop in the thoracic region and are more likely to occur intradurally, compared with SACs in the general population. Overall outcomes following surgical fenestration or excision of SACs are excellent, with complete remission or improvement of symptoms achieved in 87% of cases.

Restricted access

Aaron E. Bond, Robert F. Dallapiazza, M. Beatriz Lopes and W. Jeffrey Elias

OBJECTIVE

Stereotactic deep brain stimulation surgery is most commonly performed while patients are awake. This allows for intraoperative clinical assessment and electrophysiological target verification, thereby promoting favorable outcomes with few side effects. Intraoperative CT and MRI have challenged this concept of clinical treatment validation. Image-guided surgery is capable of delivering electrodes precisely to a planned, stereotactic target; however, these methods can be limited by low anatomical resolution even with sophisticated MRI modalities. The authors are developing a novel method using convection-enhanced delivery to safely manipulate the extracellular space surrounding common anatomical targets for surgery. By altering the extracellular content of deep subcortical structures and their associated white matter tracts, the MRI visualization of the basal ganglia can be improved to better define the anatomy. This technique could greatly improve the accuracy and success of stereotactic surgery, potentially eliminating the reliance on awake surgery.

METHODS

Observations were made in the clinical setting where vasogenic and cytotoxic edema improved the MRI visualization of the basal ganglia. These findings were replicated in the experimental setting using an FDA-approved intracerebral catheter that was stereotactically inserted into the thalamus or basal ganglia of 7 swine. Five swine were infused with normal saline, and 2 were infused with autologous CSF. Flow rates varied between 1 μl/min to 6 μl/min to achieve convective distributions. Concurrent MRI was performed at 15-minute intervals to monitor the volume of infusion and observe the imaging changes of the deep subcortical structures. The animals were then clinically observed, and necropsy was performed within 48 hours, 1 week, or 1 month for histological analysis.

RESULTS

In all animals, the white matter tracts became hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging as compared with basal ganglia nuclei, enabling better definition of the deep brain anatomy. The volume of distribution and infusion (Vd/Vi ratio) ranged from 2.5 to 4.5. There were no observed clinical effects from the infusions. Histological analysis demonstrated mild neuronal effects from saline infusions but no effects from CSF infusions.

CONCLUSIONS

This work provides the initial foundation for a novel approach to improve the visualization of deep brain anatomy during MRI-guided, stereotactic procedures. Convective infusions of CSF alter the extracellular fluid content of the brain for improved MRI without evidence of clinical or toxic effects.

Free access

Tony R. Wang, Aaron E. Bond, Robert F. Dallapiazza, Aaron Blanke, David Tilden, Thomas E. Huerta, Shayan Moosa, Francesco U. Prada and W. Jeffrey Elias

Although the use of focused ultrasound (FUS) in neurosurgery dates to the 1950s, its clinical utility was limited by the need for a craniotomy to create an acoustic window. Recent technological advances have enabled efficient transcranial delivery of US. Moreover, US is now coupled with MRI to ensure precise energy delivery and monitoring. Thus, MRI-guided transcranial FUS lesioning is now being investigated for myriad neurological and psychiatric disorders. Among the first transcranial FUS treatments is thalamotomy for the treatment of various tremors. The authors provide a technical overview of FUS thalamotomy for tremor as well as important lessons learned during their experience with this emerging technology.

Full access

Robert Dallapiazza, Aaron E. Bond, Yuval Grober, Robert G. Louis, Spencer C. Payne, Edward H. Oldfield and John A. Jane Jr.

Object

The object of this study was to compare surgical outcomes and complications in a contemporaneous series of patients undergoing either microscopic or endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas without imaging evidence of cavernous sinus invasion.

Methods

This is a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database from a single institution. Data were collected from patients whose surgery had occurred in the period from June 2010 to January 2013. Patients who underwent microscopic or endoscopic surgery for Knosp Grade 0, 1, or 2 nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas were included in the study. Patients who had clinically secreting or Knosp Grade 3 or 4 tumors and patients who were undergoing revision surgery were excluded from analysis. Eligible patient records were analyzed for outcomes and complications. Statistical analyses were performed on tumor volume, intraoperative factors, postoperative complications, and degree of resection on 1-year postoperative MRI. The results were used to compare the outcomes after microscopic and endoscopic approaches.

Results

Forty-three patients underwent microscopic transsphenoidal surgery, and 56 underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. There were no statistical differences in the intraoperative extent of resection or endocrinological complications. There were significantly more intraoperative CSF leaks in the endoscopic group (58% vs 16%); however, there was no difference in the incidence of postoperative CSF rhinorrhea (12% microscopic vs 7% endoscopic). Length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in patients undergoing an endoscopic approach (3.0 days vs 2.4 days). Two-month follow-up imaging was available in 95% of patients, and 75% of patients had 1-year follow-up imaging. At 2 months postprocedure, there was no evidence of residual tumor in 79% (31 of 39) and 85% (47 of 55) of patients in the microscopic and endoscopic groups, respectively. At 1 year postprocedure, 83% (25 of 30) of patients in the microscopic group had no evidence of residual tumor and 82% (36 of 44) of those in the endoscopic group had no evidence of residual tumor.

Conclusions

The microscopic and endoscopic techniques provide similar outcomes in the surgical treatment of Knosp Grades 0–2 nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas.