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  • Author or Editor: Yukihiko Fujii x
  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics x
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Atsuko Harada, Kenichi Nishiyama, Junichi Yoshimura, Masakazu Sano and Yukihiko Fujii

Object

Sacrococcygeal dimples in the gluteal fold, also known as coccygeal pits, are observed in 2%–4% of newborns. Sacrococcygeal dimples are not generally considered to be associated with a significant risk of intraspinal anomalies and therefore are not thought to require further radiographic evaluation. Accordingly, the precise incidence and nature of intraspinal lesions that may be associated with sacrococcygeal dimples is unclear. This study was conducted to determine the incidence of intraspinal lesions in patients with intergluteal dimples.

Methods

In this study, the authors used MRI to evaluate 103 children who were seen at the Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital between 2006 and 2011 because of skin abnormalities in the lumbosacral region. Of these children, 14 were excluded as having a subcutaneous fatty mass, and 5 were excluded because the dimples were above the gluteal fold or did not end at the coccyx. The remaining 84 patients were classified according to whether the bottom of the dimple was visible (shallow) or not (deep). The authors also retrospectively examined other skin abnormalities and coexisting anomalies.

Results

The mean age at the time of MRI evaluation was 11.7 months. Magnetic resonance imaging led to the identification of fibrolipoma of the terminal filum (FTF) in 14 cases (16.7%); 6 of these patients also had a low conus. Classified by depth, there were 58 cases with shallow and 26 with deep dimples. Fibrolipoma of the terminal filum was found in significantly more patients with deep dimples (9 [34.6%]) than in those with shallow dimples (5 [8.6%]). The frequency of other congenital anomalies was significantly higher in patients with FTF-associated dimples (6 [42.9%] of 14) than in those with dimples that were not associated with FTF (9 [12.9%] of 70).

Conclusions

Fibrolipoma of the terminal filum was identified by MRI in 16.7% of patients with sacrococcygeal dimples. The risk of FTF increased when the dimples were deeply excavated or were accompanied by congenital anomalies. Magnetic resonance imaging should be performed to identify intraspinal lesions when there are high risk factors for intraspinal abnormalities, or when an ultrasound screening suggests intraspinal abnormalities.

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Kazuhiko Nishino, Yasushi Ito, Takatoshi Sorimachi, Junsuke Shimbo and Yukihiko Fujii

Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a neurocutaneous disorder presenting with a facial port-wine stain, along with an occipital leptomeningeal angiomatosis that is typically located ipsilateral to the stain. In this paper, the authors present a rare case of SWS associated with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) instead of an angiomatosis in the ipsilateral occipital lobe. While the patient was in the care of the authors, the AVM progressively enlarged, and was accompanied by progressive stenoocclusive changes of the venous system. The resulting brain edema finally brought about a serious neurological condition 13 years after the initial diagnosis. Transarterial embolization and medical treatments decreased the edema. Subsequently, however, a large intraparenchymal cyst appeared, aggravating the patient's motor weakness. Aspiration of the cyst ameliorated these symptoms. The analysis of the fluid from the cyst revealed that it contained a very high concentration of protein. Although there is no proven pathogenic mechanism to explain these protein concentrations and the enlargement of the AVM, the authors hypothesize that the progressive edema resulted from a synergic augmentation of the inflow from the AVM and the progressive obstruction of venous drainage that is a hallmark of SWS. The formation of the cyst probably resulted from the blood vessel hyperpermeability that is inherent to SWS.

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Shinya Jinguji, Junichi Yoshimura, Kenichi Nishiyama, Hiroshi Aoki, Keisuke Nagasaki, Manabu Natsumeda, Yuichiro Yoneoka, Masafumi Fukuda and Yukihiko Fujii

Object

Radiation monotherapy—prophylactic craniospinal or whole-brain irradiation paired with a radiation boost to the primary tumor—is the standard treatment for intracranial germinomas at the authors' institution. The authors assessed long-term outcomes of patients with germinoma who underwent therapy and identified factors affecting them.

Methods

The authors retrospectively analyzed data obtained in 46 patients (35 males and 11 females, age 5–43 years at diagnosis) who had been treated for intracranial germinomas between 1990 and 2009 at the authors' institution. Thirty patients had germinomas in localized regions and 16 in multiple regions. Thirty-eight patients (83%) underwent radiotherapy alone (craniospinal irradiation in 32 and whole-brain irradiation in 6). Seven patients underwent radiochemotherapy and 1 underwent chemotherapy alone. The mean radiation doses for the whole brain, spine, and primary tumor site were 26.9, 26.6, and 49.8 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up period was 125 months.

Results

The 10-year overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 93.3% and 89.3%, respectively. None of the 38 patients who received radiation monotherapy developed a recurrent lesion, whereas 1 of 7 who underwent radiochemotherapy and the 1 patient who underwent chemotherapy had a recurrent lesion. Of the entire population, 26 patients required hormone replacement therapy, 2 had short stature, and 1 developed a radiation-induced meningioma. Seventeen of the 25 childhood- or adolescent-onset patients were 19 years or older at the latest follow-up visit, 15 of whom graduated from senior high school, and only 2 of whom graduated from college. Of 34 patients who were 19 years or older at the latest visit, 4 were students, 18 worked independently, 4 worked in sheltered workplaces, and 8 were unemployed. Of the 34 patients, 4 got married after the initial treatment, 3 of whom had children. There were 8 patients (17%) with low postoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores that were significantly associated with impaired neurocognitive functions, severe surgical complications, and neurological impairments. In 10 of the 46 patients, KPS scores at the latest visit were lower than their postoperative KPS scores. These decreases in KPS scores were significantly correlated with a delayed decline in neurocognitive functions in childhood-onset patients and a postoperative impairment of neurocognitive functions in patients with adolescent- or adult-onset germinoma.

Conclusions

No tumor recurrence occurred in germinoma patients treated with the authors' radiation monotherapy, which appears to be effective enough to cure the tumor. Brain damage caused by tumors themselves and surgical complications were found to adversely affect functional outcomes in patients regardless of their age. Although radiotherapy rarely caused late adverse effects in patients with adolescent- or adult-onset, in some childhood-onset lesions, the radiation seems to carry the risk of neurocognitive dysfunctions, which are attributable to late adverse effects. Accordingly, treatments for germinoma patients should be selected according to a patient's age and the extent of the tumor and with particular care to avoid surgical complications.

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Shinya Jinguji, Kouichirou Okamoto, Junichi Yoshimura, Yuichiro Yoneoka, Ryousuke Ogura, Akihiko Saito and Yukihiko Fujii

The authors report a rare case involving the occurrence of metachronous pure germinomas long after treatment of a mixed germ cell tumor (GCT) categorized as having a poor prognosis. A neurohypophysial germinoma occurred 4 years and 6 months after the initial treatment of a mixed pineal GCT containing a yolk sac tumor and a germinoma. Furthermore, intramedullary germinomas occurred 21 years after the initial treatment of the mixed GCT and 15 years after the second treatment of the neurohypophysial germinoma. The neurohypophysial germinoma was not confirmed histopathologically, but the intramedullary germinoma was histopathologically diagnosed as a pure germinoma. Serum α-fetoprotein levels at the second neurohypophysial and third intramedullary occurrences of the germinomas were less than 10 ng/ml. Therefore, no yolk sac components seemed to be contained in the tumors. The second neurohypophysial and third intramedullary germinomas might be recurrences of the germinoma component of the pineal mixed GCT, which consisted of a yolk sac tumor and a germinoma. However, it seems very unlikely that only the germinoma, categorized in the good prognosis group, would be the only one to recur. Hence, it seems plausible that both the second and the third occurrences of pure germinoma were de novo metachronous GCTs arising after the pineal mixed GCT was cured. The authors' case indicates the possibility of multicentric GCTs in the CNS.

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Satoko Kojima, Junichi Yoshimura, Tetsuro Takao, Tetsuro Tamura, Kenichi Nishiyama, Shigeru Maruyama, Masashi Suda and Yukihiko Fujii

The authors report the case of a mobile spinal enterogenous cyst in a 2-year-old boy, who was admitted to the hospital several times for intermittent paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT revealed an isolated cyst in the lumbar spinal canal. The symptoms were caused by transient myelopathy of the conus medullaris and radiculopathy of the cauda equina due to the changing size and location of the cyst. The cyst was surgically extirpated, after which the symptoms resolved. The histopathological diagnosis was enterogenous cyst. The clinical history of intraspinal enterogenous cyst is usually progressive. Mobility and changes in size are rare pathophysiological findings. The authors speculate that the cyst wall did not adhere to the surrounding structures and had ruptured and quickly reformed. Enterogenous cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal intradural cysts in children with radiculomyelopathy.

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Junichi Yoshimura, Yoshihiro Tsukamoto, Masakazu Sano, Hitoshi Hasegawa, Kazuhiko Nishino, Akihiko Saito, Masafumi Fukuda, Kouichirou Okamoto and Yukihiko Fujii

The authors report a rare case of a huge hypervascular tentorial cavernous angioma treated with preoperative endovascular embolization, followed by successful gross-total removal. A 15-year-old girl presented with scintillation, diplopia, and papilledema. Computed tomography and MRI studies revealed a huge irregularly shaped tumor located in the right occipital and suboccipital regions. The tumor, which had both intra- and extradural components, showed marked enhancement and invasion of the overlying occipital bone. Angiography revealed marked tumor stain, with blood supply mainly from a large branch of the left posterior meningeal artery. Therefore, this lesion was diagnosed as a tentorium-based extraaxial tumor. For differential diagnosis, meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, and malignant skull tumor were considered. Tumor feeders were endovascularly embolized with particles of polyvinyl alcohol. On the following day, the tumor was safely gross totally removed with minimum blood loss. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous angioma. To date, there have been no reports of tentorium-based cavernous angiomas endovascularly embolized preoperatively. A tentorial cavernous angioma is most likely to show massive intraoperative bleeding. Therefore, preoperative embolization appears to be quite useful for safe maximum resection. Hence, the authors assert that the differential diagnosis of tentorium-based tumors should include tentorial cavernous angioma, for which preoperative endovascular embolization should be considered.