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  • Author or Editor: Torstein Meling x
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Torstein R. Meling

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Roberto C. Heros

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Pål A. Rønning, Eirik Helseth, Torstein R. Meling and Tom B. Johannesen

OBJECTIVE

The impact of pregnancy on survival in female patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) is unknown and controversial. The authors designed a retrospective cohort study on prospectively collected registry data to assess the influence of pregnancy and child delivery on the survival of female patients with LGG.

METHODS

In Norway, the reporting of all births and cancer diagnoses to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN) and the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), respectively, is compulsory by law. Furthermore, every individual has a unique 11-digit identification number. The CRN was searched to identify all female patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of World Health Organization (WHO) Grade II astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, or pilocytic astrocytoma who were 16–40 years of age at the time of diagnosis during the period from January 1, 1970, to December 31, 2008. Obstetrical information was obtained from the MBRN for each patient. The effect of pregnancy on survival was evaluated using a Cox model with parity as a time-dependent variable.

RESULTS

The authors identified 65 patients who gave birth to 95 children after an LGG diagnosis. They also identified 281 patients who did not give birth after an LGG diagnosis. The median survival was 14.3 years (95% CI 11.7–20.6 years) for the entire study population. The effect of pregnancy was insignificant in the multivariate model (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.35–1.42).

CONCLUSIONS

Pregnancy does not seem to have an impact on the survival of female patients with LGG.

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Bernt Filip Hasseleid, Torstein R. Meling, Pål Rønning, David Scheie and Eirik Helseth

Object

Recently the relevance of Simpson resection grade as a prognostic factor for recurrence of WHO Grade I meningiomas was challenged, contradicting many previous scientific reports and traditional neurosurgical teaching. The objective of this study was to determine whether the predictive value of Simpson resection grade is outdated or remains valid with respect to meningioma recurrence and overall survival.

Methods

All patients at least 16 years old who underwent primary craniotomies for convexity meningiomas at Oslo University–affiliated hospitals (Rikshospitalet and Ullevål University Hospitals) in the period between January 1, 1990, and January 27, 2011, were included. Overall survival and retreatment-free survival rates were correlated with patient- and surgery-specific factors.

Results

Three hundred ninety-one consecutive patients were included in the study. The median patient age was 60.1 years (range 19–92 years). The female-to-male ratio was 2.1:1. The WHO grades were Grade I in 353 (90.3%), Grade II in 22 (5.6%), and Grade III in 16 (4.1%). The follow-up rate was 100%. Median follow-up time was 7.1 years (range 0.0–20.9 years) and total observation time was 3147 patient-years. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival rates were 96%, 89%, and 78%, respectively. Age, sex, WHO grade, and Simpson grade were significantly associated with overall survival. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year retreatment-free survival rates were 99%, 94%, and 90%, respectively. Simpson resection grade and WHO grade were significantly associated with retreatment-free survival. The hazard ratios for retreatment after combined Simpson resection Grades II+III and IV+V were 4.9- and 13.2-times higher than after Simpson Grade I resection, respectively.

Conclusions

Simpson Grade I resection should continue to be the goal for convexity meningiomas.

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Johan Pallud and Sophie Peeters

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Torstein R. Meling, Angelika Sorteberg, Søren J. Bakke, Haldor Slettebø, Juha Hernesniemi and Wilhelm Sorteberg

Object

The object of this study was to evaluate cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from ruptured blood blister–like aneurysms (BBAs) of the internal carotid artery (ICA) trunk.

Methods

The authors performed a single-center, retrospective study. Data analyzed were patient age, sex, Hunt and Hess grade, Fisher grade, time from SAH to hospitalization, aneurysm size and location, collateral capacity of the circle of Willis, time from hospitalization to aneurysm repair, type of aneurysm repair, complications, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at follow-up.

Results

A total of 211 patients suffered SAH from ICA aneurysms. Of these, 14 patients (6.6%) had ICA trunk BBAs; 6 men and 8 women. The median age was 47.8 years (range 29.9–67.7 years). The Hunt and Hess grade was IV or V in 7 cases, and SAH was Fisher Grade 3 + 4 in 6. All aneurysms were small (< 1 cm), without relation to vessel bifurcations, and usually located anteromedially on the ICA trunk. Three patients were treated with coil placement and 11 with clip placement. Of the 7 patients in whom the ICA was preserved, only 1 had poor outcome (GOS Score 2). In contrast, cerebral infarcts developed in all patients treated with ICA sacrifice, directly postoperatively in 2 and after delay in 5. Six patients died, 1 survived in poor condition (GOS Score 3; p < 0.001).

Conclusions

Internal carotid BBAs are rare, small, and difficult to treat endovascularly, with only 2 of 14 patients successfully treated with coil placement. The BBAs rupture easily during surgery (ruptured in 6 of 11 surgical cases). Intraoperative aneurysm rupture invariably led to ICA trap ligation. Sacrifice of the ICA within 48 hours of an SAH led to very poor outcome, even in patients with adequate collateral capacity on preoperative angiograms, probably because of vasospasm-induced compromise of the cerebral collaterals.

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Leena Kivipelto, Mika Niemelä, Torstein Meling, Martin Lehecka, Hanna Lehto and Juha Hernesniemi

Object

The object of this study was to describe the authors' institutional experience in the treatment of complex middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms necessitating bypass and vessel sacrifice.

Methods

Cases in which patients with MCA aneurysms were treated with a combination of bypass and parent artery sacrifice were reviewed retrospectively.

Results

The authors identified 24 patients (mean age 46 years) who were treated with bypass and parent artery sacrifice. The aneurysms were located in the M1 segment in 7 patients, MCA bifurcation in 8, and more distally in 9. The mean aneurysm diameter was 30 mm (range 7–60 mm, median 26 mm). There were 8 saccular and 16 fusiform aneurysms.

Twenty-one extracranial-intracranial and 4 intracranial-intracranial bypasses were performed. Partial or total trapping (only) of the parent artery was performed in 17 cases, trapping with resection of aneurysm in 3, and aneurysm clipping with sacrifice of an M2 branch in 4.

The mean follow-up period was 27 months. The aneurysm obliteration rate was 100%. No recanalization of the aneurysms was detected during follow-up.

There was 1 perioperative death (4% mortality rate) and 6 cerebrovascular accidents, causing permanent morbidity in 5 patients. The median modified Rankin Scale score of patients with an M1 aneurysm increased from 0 preoperatively to 2 at latest follow-up, while the score was unchanged in other patients. Most of the permanent deficits were associated with M1 aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (88%) had good outcome as defined by a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5.

Conclusions

Bypass in combination with parent vessel occlusion is a useful technique with acceptable frequencies of morbidity and mortality for complex MCA aneurysms when conventional surgical or endovascular techniques are not feasible. The location of the aneurysm should be considered when planning the type of bypass and the site of vessel occlusion. Flow alteration by partial trapping may be preferable to total trapping for the M1 aneurysms.