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  • Author or Editor: Jakub Godzik x
  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics x
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Thomas L. Beaumont, Jakub Godzik, Sonika Dahiya and Matthew D. Smyth

The authors report the case of a 14-year-old male with a subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) that occurred in the absence of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The patient presented with progressive headache and the sudden onset of nausea and vomiting. Neuroimaging revealed an enhancing left ventricular mass located in the region of the foramen of Monro with significant mass effect and midline shift. The lesion had radiographic characteristics of SEGA; however, the diagnosis remained unclear given the absence of clinical features of TSC. The patient underwent gross-total resection of the tumor with resolution of his symptoms. Although tumor histology was consistent with SEGA, genetic analysis of both germline and tumor DNA revealed no TSC1/2 mutations. Similarly, a comprehensive clinical evaluation failed to reveal any clinical features characteristic of TSC. Few cases of SEGA without clinical or genetic evidence of TSC have been reported. The histogenesis, genetics, and clinical approach to this rare lesion are briefly reviewed.

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Jakub Godzik, Michael P. Kelly, Alireza Radmanesh, David Kim, Terrence F. Holekamp, Matthew D. Smyth, Lawrence G. Lenke, Joshua S. Shimony, Tae Sung Park, Jeffrey Leonard and David D. Limbrick

Object

Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is a developmental abnormality often associated with a spinal syrinx. Patients with syringomyelia are known to have an increased risk of scoliosis, yet the influence of specific radiographically demonstrated features on the prevalence of scoliosis remains unclear. The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship of maximum syrinx diameter and tonsillar descent to the presence of scoliosis in patients with CM-I–associated syringomyelia. A secondary objective was to explore the role of craniovertebral junction (CVJ) characteristics as additional risk factors for scoliosis.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of pediatric patients evaluated for CM-I with syringomyelia at a single institution in the period from 2000 to 2012. Syrinx morphology and CVJ parameters were evaluated with MRI, whereas the presence of scoliosis was determined using standard radiographic criteria. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze radiological features that were independently associated with scoliosis.

Results

Ninety-two patients with CM-I and syringomyelia were identified. The mean age was 10.5 ± 5 years. Thirty-five (38%) of 92 patients had spine deformity; 23 (66%) of these 35 patients were referred primarily for deformity, and 12 (34%) were diagnosed with deformity during workup for other symptoms. Multiple regression analysis revealed maximum syrinx diameter > 6 mm (OR 12.1, 95% CI 3.63–40.57, p < 0.001) and moderate (5–12 mm) rather than severe (> 12 mm) tonsillar herniation (OR 7.64, 95% CI 2.3–25.31, p = 0.001) as significant predictors of spine deformity when controlling for age, sex, and syrinx location.

Conclusions

The current study further elucidates the association between CM-I and spinal deformity by defining specific radiographic characteristics associated with the presence of scoliosis. Specifically, patients presenting with larger maximum syrinx diameters (> 6 mm) have an increased risk of scoliosis.