Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Ajay Garg x
  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Vipul Gupta, Tanvir Rizvi, Ajay Garg, Shailesh B. Gaikwad and N. K. Mishra

✓ The authors report the case of a 30-year-old man who presented with progressive neurological deficits due to a spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM). There was sudden increase in his neurological deficits after diagnostic angiography was performed. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed complete thrombosis of the malformation. Stenosis in the draining vein was the most probable cause of this postangiographic occlusion of the AVM. Contrast injection during angiography may have precipitated the thrombosis.

Restricted access

Metachronous double spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas

Case report and review of the literature

Tanvir Rizvi, Ajay Garg, Nalini K. Mishra, Shailesh B. Gaikwad and Vipul Gupta

✓ Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs), the most common of spinal vascular malformations, are AVFs in the dura mater of the nerve root and/or adjacent spinal dura. These fistulas are most often solitary and are fed by a single radicular artery that primarily supplies the dura mater. Multiple spinal DAVFs are rarely reported in the literature. Those that have been documented have been synchronous in their presentation in that they were found during the same examination or were present at the initial examination but missed and only recognized at the second examination. The authors report the case of a patient with two spinal DAVFs occurring at different spinal levels at different points in time (metachronous).

Restricted access

Mehar Chand Sharma, Chitra Sarkar, Deepali Jain, Vaishali Suri, Ajay Garg and Sandeep Vaishya

✓The presence of müllerian-origin tissue in the lumbosacral region is extremely uncommon. The authors report two cases of müllerian-origin tissue in that region. In the first case a 33-year-old woman harbored a conus medullaris mass lesion. Spinal dysraphism, tethered cord syndrome (TCS), and diastematomyelia were also present. In the second case a 24-year-old woman presented with low-back pain and a conus medullaris lesion, which was a cause of the TCS. Pathological examination in both cases revealed a uterus-like structure with evidence of fresh and old hemorrhage. The rarity of this lesion and its association with diastematomyelia requires documentation.