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Maria Peris-Celda, Avital Perry, Lucas P. Carlstrom, Christopher S. Graffeo, Colin L. W. Driscoll and Michael J. Link

OBJECTIVE

Middle fossa surgery is challenging, and reliable surgical landmarks are essential to perform accurate and safe surgery. Although many descriptions of the middle fossa components have been published, a clinically practical description of this very complex anatomical region is lacking. Small structure arrangements in this area are often not well visualized or accurately demarcated with neuronavigation systems. The objective is to describe a “roadmap” of key surgical reference points and landmarks during middle fossa surgery to help the surgeon predict where critical structures will be located.

METHODS

The authors studied 40 dry skulls (80 sides) obtained from the anatomical board at their institution. Measurements of anatomical structures in the middle fossa were made with a digital caliper and a protractor, taking as reference the middle point of the external auditory canal (MEAC). The results were statistically analyzed.

RESULTS

The petrous part of the temporal bone was found at a mean of 16 mm anterior and 24 mm posterior to the MEAC. In 87% and 99% of the sides, the foramen ovale and foramen spinosum, respectively, were encountered deep to the zygomatic root. The posterior aspect of the greater superficial petrosal nerve (GSPN) groove was a mean of 6 mm anterior and 25 mm medial to the MEAC, nearly parallel to the petrous ridge. The main axis of the IAC projected to the root of the zygoma in all cases. The internal auditory canal (IAC) porus was found 5.5 mm lateral and 4.5 mm deep to the lateral aspect of the trigeminal impression along the petrous ridge (mean measurement values). A projection from this point to the middle aspect of the root of the zygoma, being posterior to the GSPN groove, could estimate the orientation of the IAC.

CONCLUSIONS

In middle fossa approaches, the external acoustic canal is a reliable reference before skin incision, whereas the zygomatic root becomes important after the skin incision. Deep structures can be related to these 2 anatomical structures. An easy method to predict the location of the IAC in surgery is described. Careful study of the preoperative imaging is essential to adapt this knowledge to the individual anatomy of the patient.

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Satoshi Kiyofuji, Amanda M. Casabella, Christopher S. Graffeo, Avital Perry, James A. Garrity and Michael J. Link

OBJECTIVE

Sphenoorbital meningioma (SOM) is a unique skull base tumor, characterized by infiltrative involvement and hyperostosis primarily of the lesser wing of sphenoid bone, with frequent involvement of the orbital compartment. SOM often manifests with proptosis and visual impairment. Surgical technique and outcome are highly variable among studies reported in the literature. The authors present a single-surgeon experience with SOM.

METHODS

A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained institutional database was performed. A blinded imaging review by 2 study team members was completed to confirm SOM, after which chart review was carried out to capture demographics and outcomes. All statistical testing was completed using JMP Pro version 14.1.0, with significance defined as p < 0.05.

RESULTS

Forty-seven patients who underwent surgery between 2000 and 2017 were included. The median age at surgery was 47 years (range 36–70 years), 81% of patients were female, and the median follow-up was 43 months (range 0–175 months). All operations were performed via a frontotemporal craniotomy, orbitooptic osteotomy, and anterior clinoidectomy, with extensive resection of all involved bone and soft tissue. Preoperatively, proptosis was noted in 44 patients, 98% of whom improved. Twenty-eight patients (60%) had visual deficits before surgery, 21 (75%) of whom improved during follow-up. Visual field defect other than a central scotoma was the only prognostic factor for improvement in vision on multivariate analysis (p = 0.0062). Nine patients (19%) had recurrence or progression during follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

SOM is a unique skull base tumor that needs careful planning to optimize outcome. Aggressive removal of involved bone and periorbita is crucial, and proptosis and visual field defect other than a central scotoma can improve after surgery.

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Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Andrew B. Koo, Megan Lee, Adam J. Kundishora, Christopher S. Hong, Astrid C. Hengartner, Joaquin Camara-Quintana, Kristopher T. Kahle and Michael L. DiLuna

OBJECTIVE

In the past decade, a gradual transition of health policy to value-based healthcare has brought increased attention to measuring the quality of care delivered. In spine surgery, adolescents with scoliosis are a population particularly at risk for depression, anxious feelings, and impaired quality of life related to back pain and cosmetic appearance of the deformity. With the rising prevalence of mental health ailments, it is necessary to evaluate the impact of concurrent affective disorders on patient care after spinal surgery in adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact that affective disorders have on perioperative complication rates, length of stay (LOS), and total costs in adolescents undergoing elective posterior spinal fusion (PSF) (≥ 4 levels) for idiopathic scoliosis.

METHODS

A retrospective study of the Kids’ Inpatient Database for the year 2012 was performed. Adolescent patients (age range 10–17 years old) with AIS undergoing elective PSF (≥ 4 levels) were selected using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification coding system. Patients were categorized into 2 groups at discharge: affective disorder or no affective disorder. Patient demographics, comorbidities, complications, LOS, discharge disposition, and total cost were assessed. The primary outcomes were perioperative complication rates, LOS, total cost, and discharge dispositions.

RESULTS

There were 3759 adolescents included in this study, of whom 164 (4.4%) were identified with an affective disorder (no affective disorder: n = 3595). Adolescents with affective disorders were significantly older than adolescents with no affective disorders (affective disorder: 14.4 ± 1.9 years vs no affective disorder: 13.9 ± 1.8 years, p = 0.001), and had significantly different proportions of race (p = 0.005). Aside from hospital region (p = 0.016), no other patient- or hospital-level factors differed between the cohorts. Patient comorbidities did not differ significantly between cohorts. The number of vertebral levels involved was similar between the cohorts, with the majority of patients having 9 or more levels involved (affective disorder: 76.8% vs no affective disorder: 79.5%, p = 0.403). Postoperative complications were similar between the cohorts, with no significant difference in the proportion of patients experiencing a postoperative complication (p = 0.079) or number of complications (p = 0.124). The mean length of stay and mean total cost were similar between the cohorts. Moreover, the routine and nonroutine discharge dispositions were also similar between the cohorts, with the majority of patients having routine discharges (affective disorder: 93.9% vs no affective disorder: 94.9%, p = 0.591).

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that affective disorders may not have a significant impact on surgical outcomes in adolescent patients undergoing surgery for scoliosis in comparison with adults. Further studies are necessary to elucidate how affective disorders affect adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis, which may improve provider approach in managing these patients perioperatively and at follow-up in hopes to better the overall patient satisfaction and quality of care delivered.

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Van V. Halbach, Christopher F. Dowd, Randall T. Higashida, Peter A. Balousek, Samuel F. Ciricillo and Michael S. B. Edwards

Object. In this study the authors report on the results of endovascular treatment for mural-type vein of Galen malformations (VGMs) in a group of infants.

Methods. Eight children (six infants and two neonates) who suffered from symptoms caused by a mural-type VGM were treated by means of endovascular therapy. Their age at the time of treatment ranged from 13 days to 19 months (mean 7.6 months). Two neonates and three infants who presented with hydrocephalus and increased head circumference, one of whom was stabilized with a shunt, underwent elective closure of the malformations 3, 4, 6, 6, and 13 months later, respectively. Two patients presented with hemorrhage; one had an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) on the 1st day of life and one, a 5-month-old infant, suffered a large parenchymal hemorrhage and an IVH; both patients were immediately cured by means of endovascular techniques. One child presented with a seizure and cortical venous drainage that were treated immediately. Eleven separate treatment sessions were conducted; eight via transarterial femoral access and the remaining three via a transvenous approach. Two patients were treated by using transfemoral transvenous embolization with fibered coils, and one patient required a transtorcular transvenous approach to permit complete closure of the fistula with electrolytically detachable coils. The embolic devices used included silk suture emboli (three patients), electrolytically detachable coils (three patients), and fibered platinum coils (seven patients). In seven patients, complete closure was demonstrated on postembolization arteriographic studies. The eighth patient had stagnant flow in a giant 6-cm varix treated with arterial and venous coils but has not yet undergone follow-up studies. Late follow-up arteriography was performed in four patients at times ranging from 11 to 24 months postprocedure. In one patient, thrombosis of the malformation and shrinkage of the varix were confirmed on follow-up computerized tomography scanning. The remaining three patients have not yet undergone follow-up angiographic examination. Two asymptomatic complications occurred, including separation of the distal catheter, which was removed with a snare device, and a single platinum coil that embolized to the lung, producing no symptoms in 101 months of clinical follow up. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 105 months, with a mean of 52 months.

Conclusions. Endovascular therapy is the treatment of choice for mural-type VGMs and offers a high rate of cure with low morbidity.

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Stanley L. Barnwell, Christopher F. Dowd, Richard L. Davis, Michael S. B. Edwards, Philip H. Gutin and Charles B. Wilson

✓ The cases of seven patients with intramedullary, cryptic vascular malformations of the spinal cord are reported. In all patients, the clinical course was progressive; a Brown-Séquard syndrome was the most common presenting symptom complex. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in all patients. The pattern seen most often was a focus of high signal (on both T1- and T2-weighted MR images) surrounded by a larger zone of low signal (best seen on T2-weighted images), and was remarkably similar for all patients. Six patients underwent surgical exploration; removal of the lesions halted the progression of symptoms in five patients, and one patient had worsened sensory function after surgery. Motor function did not decrease postoperatively in any patient. The one patient who refused surgery has continued to decline neurologically. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens showed a cavernous malformation in one patient, a venous malformation in one, venous varices in two, and organizing hematomas in two; these findings are markedly different from those in previously reported cases of cryptic vascular malformations.

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Frederick G. Barker II, Christopher S. Ogilvy, John K. Chin, Michael P. Joseph, John Pile-Spellman and Robert M. Crowell

✓ The authors describe a case of carotid-cavernous fistula that was not treatable by the standard interventional neuroradiological techniques of transarterial or transvenous occlusion of the fistula because access was blocked by prior trapping procedures. Access to the venous side of the fistula was gained by means of a transethmoidal transsphenoidal exposure, making it possible to embolize the lesion with coils. The details of this approach are described.

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Michael P. Kelly, Lawrence G. Lenke, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Christopher P. Ames, Leah Y. Carreon, Virginie Lafage, Justin S. Smith and Adam L. Shimer

Object

The goal in this study was to evaluate the risk factors for complications, including new neurological deficits, in the largest cohort of patients with adult spinal deformity to date.

Methods

The Scoli-RISK-1 inclusion criteria were used to identify eligible patients from 5 centers who were treated between June 1, 2009, and June 1, 2011. Records were reviewed for patient demographic information, surgical data, and reports of perioperative complications. Neurological deficits were recorded as preexisting or as new deficits. Patients who underwent 3-column osteotomies (3COs) were compared with those who did not (posterior spinal fusion [PSF]). Between-group comparisons were performed using independent samples t-tests and chi-square analyses.

Results

Two hundred seven patients were identified—75 who underwent PSF and 132 treated with 3CO. In the latter group, patients were older (58.9 vs 49.4 years, p < 0.001), had a higher body mass index (29.0 vs 25.8, p = 0.029), smaller preoperative coronal Cobb measurements (33.8° vs 56.4°, p < 0.001), more preoperative sagittal malalignment (11.7 cm vs 5.4 cm, p < 0.001), and similar sagittal Cobb measurements (45.8° vs 57.7°, p = 0.113). Operating times were similar (393 vs 423 minutes, p = 0.130), although patients in the 3CO group sustained higher estimated blood loss (2120 vs 1700 ml, p = 0.066). Rates of new neurological deficits were similar (PSF: 6.7% vs 3CO: 9.9%, p = 0.389), and rates of any perioperative medical complication were similar (PSF: 46.7% vs 3CO: 50.8%, p = 0.571). Patients who underwent vertebral column resection (VCR) were more likely to sustain medical complications than those treated with pedicle subtraction osteotomy (73.7% vs 46.9%, p = 0.031), although new neurological deficits were similar (15.8% vs 8.8%, p = 0.348). Regression analysis did not reveal significant predictors of neurological injury or complication from collected data.

Conclusions

Despite higher estimated blood loss, rates of all complications (49.3%) and new neurological deficits (8.7%) did not vary for patients who underwent complex reconstruction, whether or not a 3CO was performed. Patients who underwent VCR sustained more medical complications without an increase in new neurological deficits. Prospective studies of patient factors, provider factors, and refined surgical data are needed to define and optimize risk factors for complication and neurological deficits.

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Zachary A. Seymour, Penny K. Sneed, Nalin Gupta, Michael T. Lawton, Annette M. Molinaro, William Young, Christopher F. Dowd, Van V. Halbach, Randall T. Higashida and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECT

Large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) remain difficult to treat, and ideal treatment parameters for volume-staged stereotactic radiosurgery (VS-SRS) are still unknown. The object of this study was to compare VS-SRS treatment outcomes for AVMs larger than 10 ml during 2 eras; Era 1 was 1992-March 2004, and Era 2 was May 2004–2008. In Era 2 the authors prospectively decreased the AVM treatment volume, increased the radiation dose per stage, and shortened the interval between stages.

METHODS

All cases of VS-SRS treatment for AVM performed at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed.

RESULTS

Of 69 patients intended for VS-SRS, 63 completed all stages. The median patient age at the first stage of VS-SRS was 34 years (range 9–68 years). The median modified radiosurgery-based AVM score (mRBAS), total AVM volume, and volume per stage in Era 1 versus Era 2 were 3.6 versus 2.7, 27.3 ml versus 18.9 ml, and 15.0 ml versus 6.8 ml, respectively. The median radiation dose per stage was 15.5 Gy in Era 1 and 17.0 Gy in Era 2, and the median clinical follow-up period in living patients was 8.6 years in Era 1 and 4.8 years in Era 2. All outcomes were measured from the first stage of VS-SRS. Near or complete obliteration was more common in Era 2 (log-rank test, p = 0.0003), with 3- and 5-year probabilities of 5% and 21%, respectively, in Era 1 compared with 24% and 68% in Era 2. Radiosurgical dose, AVM volume per stage, total AVM volume, era, compact nidus, Spetzler-Martin grade, and mRBAS were significantly associated with near or complete obliteration on univariate analysis. Dose was a strong predictor of response (Cox proportional hazards, p < 0.001, HR 6.99), with 3- and 5-year probabilities of near or complete obliteration of 5% and 16%, respectively, at a dose < 17 Gy versus 23% and 74% at a dose ≥ 17 Gy. Dose per stage, compact nidus, and total AVM volume remained significant predictors of near or complete obliteration on multivariate analysis. Seventeen patients (25%) had salvage surgery, SRS, and/or embolization. Allowing for salvage therapy, the probability of cure was more common in Era 2 (log-rank test, p = 0.0007) with 5-year probabilities of 0% in Era 1 versus 41% in Era 2. The strong trend toward improved cure in Era 2 persisted on multivariate analysis even when considering mRBAS (Cox proportional hazards, p = 0.055, HR 4.01, 95% CI 0.97–16.59). The complication rate was 29% in Era 1 compared with 13% in Era 2 (Cox proportional hazards, not significant).

CONCLUSIONS

VS-SRS is an option to obliterate or downsize large AVMs. Decreasing the AVM treatment volume per stage to ≤ 8 ml with this technique allowed a higher dose per fraction and decreased time to response, as well as improved rates of near obliteration and cure without increasing complications. Reducing the volume of these very large lesions can facilitate a surgical approach for cure.

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Michael Safaee, Michael C. Oh, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Philip R. Weinstein, Christopher P. Ames, Dean Chou, Mitchel S. Berger, Andrew T. Parsa and Nalin Gupta

Object

Ependymomas are a common type of CNS tumor in children, although only 13% originate from the spinal cord. Aside from location and extent of resection, the factors that affect outcome are not well understood.

Methods

The authors performed a search of an institutional neuropathology database to identify all patients with spinal cord ependymomas treated over the past 20 years. Data on patient age, sex, clinical presentation, symptom duration, tumor location, extent of resection, use of radiation therapy, surgical complications, presence of tumor recurrence, duration of follow-up, and residual symptoms were collected. Pediatric patients were defined as those 21 years of age or younger at diagnosis. The extent of resection was defined by the findings of the postoperative MR images.

Results

A total of 24 pediatric patients with spinal cord ependymomas were identified with the following pathological subtypes: 14 classic (Grade II), 8 myxopapillary (Grade I), and 2 anaplastic (Grade III) ependymomas. Both anaplastic ependymomas originated in the intracranial compartment and spread to the spinal cord at recurrence. The mean follow-up duration for patients with classic and myxopapillary ependymomas was 63 and 45 months, respectively. Seven patients with classic ependymomas underwent gross-total resection (GTR), while 4 received subtotal resection (STR), 2 received STR as well as radiation therapy, and 1 received radiation therapy alone. All but 1 patient with myxopapillary ependymomas underwent GTR. Three recurrences were identified in the Grade II group at 45, 48, and 228 months. A single recurrence was identified in the Grade I group at 71 months. The mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 58 months in the Grade II group and 45 months in the Grade I group.

Conclusions

Extent of resection is an important prognostic factor in all pediatric spinal cord ependymomas, particularly Grade II ependymomas. These data suggest that achieving GTR is more difficult in the upper spinal cord, making tumor location another important factor. Although classified as Grade I lesions, myxopapillary ependymomas had similar outcomes when compared with classic (Grade II) ependymomas, particularly with respect to PFS. Long-term complications or new neurological deficits were rare. Among patients with long-term follow-up, those who underwent GTR had a recurrence rate of 20% compared with 40% among those with STR or biopsy only, suggesting that extent of resection is perhaps a more important prognostic factor than histological grade in predicting PFS, which has been suggested by other data in the literature. Given the relative paucity of these lesions, collaborative multiinstitutional studies are needed, and such efforts should also focus on molecular and genetic analysis to refine the current classification system.

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Colin P. Derdeyn, DeWitte T. Cross III, Christopher J. Moran, George W. Brown, Thomas K. Pilgram, Michael N. Diringer, Robert L. Grubb Jr., Keith M. Rich, Michael R. Chicoine and Ralph G. Dacey Jr.

Object. Ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) may occur after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). The purpose of the present study is to investigate possible risk factors for thromboembolic events and to determine their frequency and time course.

Methods. The records of 178 consecutive patients with 193 treated intracranial saccular aneurysms were reviewed. A total of 159 GDC procedures were performed to treat 143 aneurysms in 133 of those patients who were in good neurological condition, allowing clinical detection of postprocedure ischemic events (TIA or stroke). The association of clinical, anatomical, and pharmacological factors with intraprocedure intraarterial thrombus and with postprocedure ischemic events was investigated by using uni- and multivariate analyses.

Thrombus protruding into the parent artery was noted during six of 159 GDC procedures, resulting in a clinical deficit in one patient. No factor was associated with intraprocedure intraarterial thrombus. Ten postprocedure ischemic events occurred in nine patients. Seven events occurred within 24 hours, and three events occurred between 24 hours and 58 days. Aneurysm diameter and protruding coils were significant independent predictors of postprocedure ischemic events in multivariate analysis (both p = 0.02). The actuarial risk of stroke was 3.8%.

Conclusions. Larger aneurysm diameter and protruding loops of coils are associated with postprocedure ischemic events after GDC placement. It is unlikely that GDC-treated aneurysms retain thromboembolic potential beyond 2 months.