Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 68 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Christopher Michael x
  • Journal of Neurosurgery x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Brian Y. Hwang, Samuel S. Bruce, Geoffrey Appelboom, Matthew A. Piazza, Amanda M. Carpenter, Paul R. Gigante, Christopher P. Kellner, Andrew F. Ducruet, Michael A. Kellner, Rajeev Deb-Sen, Kerry A. Vaughan, Philip M. Meyers and E. Sander Connolly Jr.

Object

Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is an independent predictor of poor outcome. Clinical methods for evaluating IVH, however, are not well established. This study sought to determine the best IVH grading scale by evaluating the predictive accuracies of IVH, Graeb, and LeRoux scores in an independent cohort of ICH patients with IVH. Subacute IVH dynamics as well as the impact of external ventricular drain (EVD) placement on IVH and outcome were also investigated.

Methods

A consecutive cohort of 142 primary ICH patients with IVH was admitted to Columbia University Medical Center between February 2009 and February 2011. Baseline demographics, clinical presentation, and hospital course were prospectively recorded. Admission CT scans performed within 24 hours of onset were reviewed for ICH location, hematoma volume, and presence of IVH. Intraventricular hemorrhage was categorized according to IVH, Graeb, and LeRoux scores. For each patient, the last scan performed within 6 days of ictus was similarly evaluated. Outcomes at discharge were assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the predictive accuracies of the grading scales for poor outcome (mRS score ≥ 3).

Results

Seventy-three primary ICH patients (51%) had IVH. Median admission IVH, Graeb, and LeRoux scores were 13, 6, and 8, respectively. Median IVH, Graeb and LeRoux scores decreased to 9 (p = 0.005), 4 (p = 0.002), and 4 (p = 0.003), respectively, within 6 days of ictus. Poor outcome was noted in 55 patients (75%). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were similar among the IVH, Graeb, and LeRoux scores (0.745, 0.743, and 0.744, respectively) and within 6 days postictus (0.765, 0.722, 0.723, respectively). Moreover, the IVH, Graeb, and LeRoux scores had similar maximum Youden Indices both at admission (0.515 vs 0.477 vs 0.440, respectively) and within 6 days postictus (0.515 vs 0.339 vs 0.365, respectively). Patients who received EVDs had higher mean IVH volumes (23 ± 26 ml vs 9 ± 11 ml, p = 0.003) and increased incidence of Glasgow Coma Scale scores < 8 (67% vs 38%, p = 0.015) and hydrocephalus (82% vs 50%, p = 0.004) at admission but had similar outcome as those who did not receive an EVD.

Conclusions

The IVH, Graeb, and LeRoux scores predict outcome well with similarly good accuracy in ICH patients with IVH when assessed at admission and within 6 days after hemorrhage. Therefore, any of one of the scores would be equally useful for assessing IVH severity and risk-stratifying ICH patients with regard to outcome. These results suggest that EVD placement may be beneficial for patients with severe IVH, who have particularly poor prognosis at admission, but a randomized clinical trial is needed to conclusively demonstrate its therapeutic value.

Restricted access

Ananth K. Vellimana, Yasha Kadkhodayan, Keith M. Rich, DeWitte T. Cross III, Christopher J. Moran, Allyson R. Zazulia, Jin-Moo Lee, Michael R. Chicoine, Ralph G. Dacey Jr., Colin P. Derdeyn and Gregory J. Zipfel

Object

The aim of this study was to define the optimal treatment for patients with symptomatic intraluminal carotid artery thrombus (ICAT).

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who had presented with symptomatic ICAT at their institution between 2001 and 2011.

Results

Twenty-four patients (16 males and 8 females) with ICAT presented with ischemic stroke (18 patients) or transient ischemic attack ([TIA], 6 patients). All were initially treated using anticoagulation with or without antiplatelet drugs. Eight of these patients had no or only mild carotid artery stenosis on initial angiography and were treated with medical management alone. The remaining 16 patients had moderate or severe carotid stenosis on initial angiography; of these, 10 underwent delayed revascularization (8 patients, carotid endarterectomy [CEA]; 2 patients, angioplasty and stenting), 2 refused revascularization, and 4 were treated with medical therapy alone. One patient had multiple TIAs despite medical therapy and eventually underwent CEA; the remaining 23 patients had no TIAs after treatment. No patient suffered ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke while on anticoagulation therapy, either during the perioperative period or in the long-term follow-up; 1 patient died of an unrelated condition. The mean follow-up was 16.4 months.

Conclusions

Results of this study suggest that initial anticoagulation for symptomatic ICAT leads to a low rate of recurrent ischemic events and that carotid revascularization, if indicated, can be safely performed in a delayed manner.

Restricted access

Chad W. Washington, Gregory J. Zipfel, Michael R. Chicoine, Colin P. Derdeyn, Keith M. Rich, Christopher J. Moran, DeWitte T. Cross and Ralph G. Dacey Jr.

Object

The purpose of aneurysm surgery is complete aneurysm obliteration while sparing associated arteries. Indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography is a new technique that allows for real-time evaluation of blood flow in the aneurysm and vessels. The authors performed a retrospective study to compare the accuracy of ICG videoangiography with intraoperative angiography (IA), and determine if ICG videoangiography can be used without follow-up IA.

Methods

From June 2007 through September 2009, 155 patients underwent craniotomies for clipping of aneurysms. Operative summaries, angiograms, and operative and ICG videoangiography videos were reviewed. The number, size, and location of aneurysms, the ICG videoangiography and IA findings, and the need for clip adjustment after ICG videoangiography and IA were recorded. Discordance between ICG videoangiography and IA was defined as ICG videoangiography demonstrating aneurysm obliteration and normal vessel flow, but post-IA showing either an aneurysmal remnant and/or vessel occlusion requiring clip adjustment.

Results

Thirty-two percent of patients (49 of 155) underwent both ICG videoangiography and IA. The post-ICG videoangiography clip adjustment rate was 4.1% (2 of 49). The overall rate of ICG videoangiography–IA agreement was 75.5% (37 of 49) and the ICG videoangiography–IA discordance rate requiring post-IA clip adjustment was 14.3% (7 of 49). Adjustments were due to 3 aneurysmal remnants and 4 vessel occlusions. These adjustments were attributed to obscuration of the residual aneurysm or the affected vessel from the field of view and the presence of dye in the affected vessel via collateral flow. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend for ICG videoangiography–IA discordance requiring clip adjustment to occur in cases involving the anterior communicating artery complex, with an odds ratio of 3.3 for ICG videoangiography–IA discordance in these cases.

Conclusions

These results suggest that care should be taken when considering ICG videoangiography as the sole means for intraoperative evaluation of aneurysm clip application. The authors further conclude that IA should remain the gold standard for evaluation during aneurysm surgery. However, a combination of ICG videoangiography and IA may ultimately prove to be the most effective strategy for maximizing the safety and efficacy of aneurysm surgery.

Restricted access

Andreas Stadlbauer, Michael Buchfelder, Christopher Nimsky, Wolfgang Saeger, Erich Salomonowitz, Katja Pinker, Gregor Richter, Hiroyoshi Akutsu and Oliver Ganslandt

Object

The aim of this study was to correlate proton MR (1H-MR) spectroscopy data with histopathological and surgical findings of proliferation and hemorrhage in pituitary macroadenomas.

Methods

Quantitative 1H-MR spectroscopy was performed on a 1.5-T unit in 37 patients with pituitary macroadenomas. A point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (TR 2000 msec, TE 135 msec) with 128 averages and chemical shift selective pulses for water suppression was used. Voxel dimensions were adapted to ensure that the volume of interest was fully located within the lesion and to obtain optimal homogeneity of the magnetic field. In addition, water-unsuppressed spectra (16 averages) were acquired from the same volume of interest for eddy current correction, absolute quantification of metabolite signals, and determination of full width at half maximum of the unsuppressed water peak (FWHMwater). Metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds (Cho) were computed using the LCModel program and correlated with MIB-1 as a proliferative cell index from a tissue specimen.

Results

In 16 patients harboring macroadenomas without hemorrhage, there was a strong positive linear correlation between metabolite concentrations of Cho and the MIB-1 proliferative cell index (R = 0.819, p < 0.001). The metabolite concentrations of Cho ranged from 1.8 to 5.2 mM, and the FWHMwater was 4.4–11.7 Hz. Eleven patients had a hemorrhagic adenoma and showed no assignable metabolite concentration of Cho, and the FWHMwater was 13.4–24.4 Hz. In 10 patients the size of the lesion was too small (< 20 mm in 2 directions) for the acquisition of MR spectroscopy data.

Conclusions

Quantitative 1H-MR spectroscopy provided important information on the proliferative potential and hemorrhaging of pituitary macroadenomas. These data may be useful for noninvasive structural monitoring of pituitary macroadenomas. Differences in the FWHMwater could be explained by iron ions of hemosiderin, which lead to worsened homogeneity of the magnetic field.

Restricted access

Amir R. Dehdashti, Laurent Thines, Leodante B. Da Costa, Karel G. terBrugge, Robert A. Willinsky, M. Christopher Wallace and Michael Tymianski

Object

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the authors' initial experience with the integration of high-resolution rotational and biplanar angiography during neurovascular operative procedures.

Methods

Eight patients with intracerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and aneurysms underwent surgical treatment of their lesions in a combined endovascular surgical suite. After initial head positioning, preoperative biplane and rotational angiography was performed. Resection of the AVM or clipping of the aneurysm was then performed. Further biplane and rotational 3D angiograms were obtained intraoperatively to confirm satisfactory treatment.

Results

One small residual AVM identified intraoperatively necessitated further resection. One aneurysm was clipped during endovascular inflation of an intracarotid balloon for temporary proximal control. The completeness of treatment was confirmed on intraoperative 3D rotational angiography in all cases, and there were no procedure-related complications.

Conclusions

Intraoperative rotational angiography performed in an integrated biplane angiography/surgery suite is a safe and useful adjunct to surgery and may enable combining endovascular and surgical procedures for the treatment of complex vascular lesions.

Restricted access

Alim P. Mitha, Benjamin Reichardt, Michael Grasruck, Eric Macklin, Soenke Bartling, Christianne Leidecker, Bernhard Schmidt, Thomas Flohr, Thomas J. Brady, Christopher S. Ogilvy and Rajiv Gupta

Object

Imaging of intracranial aneurysms using conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) is limited because of nonvisualization of features such as perforating vessels, pulsatile blebs, and neck remnants after clip placement or coil embolization. In this study, a model of intracranial saccular aneurysms in rabbits was used to assess the ultra-high resolution and dynamic scanning capabilities of a prototype flat-panel volumetric CT (fpVCT) scanner in demonstrating these features.

Methods

Ten New Zealand white rabbits underwent imaging before and after clipping or coil embolization of surgically created aneurysms in the proximal right carotid artery. Imaging was performed using a prototype fpVCT scanner, a 64-slice MDCT scanner, and traditional catheter angiography. In addition to the slice data and 3D views, 4D dynamic views, a capability unique to fpVCT, were also created and reviewed. The images were subjectively compared on 1) 4 image quality metrics (spatial resolution, noise, motion artifacts, and aneurysm surface features); 2) 4 posttreatment features reflecting the metal artifact profile of the various imaging modalities (visualization of clip or coil placement, perianeurysmal clip/coil anatomy, neck remnant, and white-collar sign); and 3) 2 dynamic features (blood flow pattern and aneurysm pulsation).

Results

Flat-panel volumetric CT provided better image resolution than MDCT and was comparable to traditional catheter angiography. The surface features of aneurysms were demonstrated with much higher resolution, detail, and clarity by fpVCT compared with MDCT and angiography. Flat-panel volumetric CT was inferior to both MDCT and angiography in terms of image noise and motion artifacts. In fpVCT images, the metallic artifacts from clips and coils were significantly fewer than those in MDCT images. As a result, clinically important information about posttreatment aneurysm neck remnants could be derived from fpVCT images but not from MDCT images. Time-resolved dynamic sequences were judged slightly inferior to conventional angiography but superior to static MDCT images.

Conclusions

The spatial resolution, surface anatomy visualization, metal artifact profile, and 4D dynamic images from fpVCT are superior to those from MDCT. Flat-panel volumetric CT demonstrates aneurysm surface features to better advantage than angiography and is comparable to angiography in metal artifact profile. Even though the temporal resolution of fpVCT is not quite as good as that of angiography, fpVCT images yield clinically important anatomical information about aneurysm surface features and posttreatment neck remnants not attainable with either angiography or MDCT images.

Restricted access

Dongmei Yang, Robert A. Knight, Yuxia Han, Kishor Karki, Jianfeng Zhang, Christopher Ding, Michael Chopp and Donald M. Seyfried

Object

Longitudinal multiparametric MR imaging and histological studies were performed on simvastatin- or atorvastatin-treated rats to evaluate vascular repair mechanisms after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).

Methods

. Primary ICH was induced in adult Wistar rats by direct infusion of 100 μl of autologous blood into the striatal region adjacent to the subventricular zone. Atorvastatin (2 mg/kg), simvastatin (2 mg/kg), or phosphate-buffered saline was given orally at 24 hours post-ICH and continued daily for 7 days. The temporal evolution of ICH in each group was assessed by MR imaging measurements of T2, T1sat, and cerebral blood flow in brain areas corresponding to the bulk of the hemorrhage (core) and edematous border (rim). Rats were killed after the final MR imaging examination at 28 days, and histological studies were performed. A small group of sham-operated animals was also studied. Neurobehavioral testing was performed in all animals. Analysis of variance methods were used to compare results from the treatment and control groups, with significance inferred at p ≤ 0.05.

Results

. Using histological indices, animals treated with simvastatin and atorvastatin had significantly increased angiogenesis and synaptogenesis in the hematoma rim compared with the control group (p ≤ 0.05). The statin-treated animals exhibited significantly increased cerebral blood flow in the hematoma rim at 4 weeks, while blood-brain barrier permeability (T1sat) and edema (T2) in the corresponding regions were reduced. Both statin-treated groups showed significant neurological improvement from 2 weeks post-ICH onward.

Conclusions

The results of the present study demonstrate that simvastatin and atorvastatin significantly improve the recovery of rats from ICH, possibly via angiogenesis and synaptic plasticity. In addition, in vivo multiparametric MR imaging measurements over time can be effectively applied to the experimental ICH model for longitudinal assessment of the therapeutic intervention.

Restricted access

Takashi Morishita, Kelly D. Foote, Samuel S. Wu, Charles E. Jacobson IV, Ramon L. Rodriguez, Ihtsham U. Haq, Mustafa S. Siddiqui, Irene A. Malaty, Christopher J. Hass and Michael S. Okun

Object

Microelectrode recording (MER) and macrostimulation (test stimulation) are used to refine the optimal deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead placement within the operative setting. It is well known that there can be a microlesion effect with microelectrode trajectories and DBS insertion. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of intraoperative MER and lead placement on tremor severity in a cohort of patients with essential tremor.

Methods

Consecutive patients with essential tremor undergoing unilateral DBS (ventral intermediate nucleus stimulation) for medication-refractory tremor were evaluated. Tremor severity was measured at 5 time points utilizing a modified Tremor Rating Scale: 1) immediately before MER; 2) immediately after MER; 3) immediately after lead implantation; 4) 6 months after DBS implantation in the off-DBS condition; and 5) 6 months after implantation in the on-DBS condition. To investigate the impact of the MER and DBS lead placement, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were applied to test changes in tremor severity scores over the surgical course. In addition, a generalized linear mixed model including factors that potentially influenced the impact of the microlesion was also used for analysis.

Results

Nineteen patients were evaluated. Improvement was noted in the total modified Tremor Rating Scale, postural, and action tremor scores (p < 0.05) as a result of MER and DBS lead placement. The improvements observed following lead placement were similar in magnitude to what was observed in the chronically programmed clinic setting parameters at 6 months after lead implantation. Improvement in tremor severity was maintained over time even in the off-DBS condition at 6 months, which was supportive of a prolonged microlesion effect. The number of macrostimulation passes, the number of MER passes, and disease duration were not related to the change in tremor severity score over time.

Conclusions

Immediate improvement in postural and intention tremors may result from MER and DBS lead placement in patients undergoing DBS for essential tremor. This improvement could be a predictor of successful DBS lead placement at 6 months. Clinicians rating patients in the operating room should be aware of these effects and should consider using rating scales before and after lead placement to take these effects into account when evaluating outcome in and out of the operating room.

Restricted access

Maxwell S. H. Laurans, Michael L. DiLuna, Dana Shin, Faheem Niazi, Jennifer R. Voorhees, Carol Nelson-Williams, Eric W. Johnson, Adrian M. Siegel, Gary K. Steinberg, Michel J. Berg, R. Michael Scott, Gioacchino Tedeschi, T. Peter Enevoldson, John Anson, Guy A. Rouleau, Christopher Ogilvy, Issam A. Awad, Richard P. Lifton and Murat Gunel

Object. A gene contributing to the autosomal-dominant cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) phenotype, KRIT1 (an acronym for Krev Interaction Trapped 1), has been identified through linkage analysis and mutation screening. The authors collected blood samples from 68 patients with familial CCM and 138 patients with apparently sporadic CCM as well as from their families, in an effort to characterize the prevalence and spectrum of disease-causing sequence variants in the KRIT1 gene.

Methods. The authors used single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis to identify genomic variants in KRIT1, which were sequenced to determine the specific mutation. Among 43 Hispanic-American kindreds who immigrated to the southwestern US from northern Mexico, 31 share an identical founder mutation. This Q455X mutation is found in 18 (86%) of 21 persons with a positive family history and in 13 (59%) of 22 persons with apparently sporadic CCM. This mutation was not found among 13 persons with CCM who were recruited from Mexico. These findings establish the key role of a recent founder mutation in Hispanic persons with CCM who live in the US.

Although nearly all Hispanic families in the US in which there are multiple CCM cases linked to the CCM1 locus, only 13 of 25 non-Hispanic CCM-carrying families have displayed evidence of linkage to the CCM1 locus. Among these 13 families, the authors identified eight independent mutations in nine kindreds. They identified four additional mutations among 22 familial CCM kindreds with no linkage information, bringing the total number of independent mutations to 12. Inherited KRIT1 mutations were not detected among 103 non-Hispanic persons in whom a family history of CCM was rigorously excluded.

Conclusions. All mutations were nonsense mutations, frame-shift mutations predicting premature termination, or splicesite mutations located throughout the KRIT1 gene, suggesting that these are genetic loss-of-function mutations. These genetic findings, in conjunction with the clinical phenotype, are consistent with a two-hit model for the occurrence of CCM.

Restricted access

Kaya Bilguvar, Mohamad Bydon, Fatih Bayrakli, A. Gulhan Ercan-Sencicek, Yasar Bayri, Christopher Mason, Michael L. DiLuna, Margretta Seashore, Richard Bronen, Richard P. Lifton, Matthew State and Murat Gunel

Object

Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is one of a spectrum of overlapping clinical syndromes resulting from mutations in the gene GLI3 on chromosome 7p. Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is caused by mutations in three distinct genes, including Malcavernin (CCM2), which also maps to chromosome 7p and is located 2.8 Mbp from GLI3. The authors describe a new syndrome that combines the vascular lesions characteristic of CCM with the hallmarks of GCPS, including polydactyly, hypertelorism, and developmental delay.

Methods

The authors used high-resolution array-based comparative genome hybridization (CGH) analysis to characterize the 3 million–bp deletion on chromosome 7 that accounts for this novel clinical presentation. A 4-year-old girl presented with polydactyly, hypertelorism, and developmental delay and was also found to have multiple CCMs after suffering a seizure.

Results

Genetic analysis using array-based CGH revealed a deletion affecting multiple genes in the 7p14-13 locus, the interval that includes both CCM2 and GLI3. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on genomic DNA confirmed this genomic lesion.

Conclusions

A novel syndrome, combining features of CCM and GCPS, can be added to the group of entities that result from deleterious genetic variants involving GLI3, including GCPS, acrocallosal syndrome, Pallister–Hall syndrome, and contiguous gene syndrome. The deletion responsible for this new entity can be easily detected using either array-based chromosomal analysis or quantitative RT-PCR.