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Visish M. Srinivasan, Joy Gumin, Kevin M. Camstra, Stephen R. Chen, Jeremiah N. Johnson, Yuzaburo Shimizu, Brittany C. Parker Kerrigan, Elizabeth J. Shpall, Frederick F. Lang and Peter Kan

OBJECTIVE

Bone marrow–derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs) have been used in clinical trials for the treatment of several neurological disorders. MSCs have been explored as a delivery modality for targeted viral therapeutic agents in the treatment of intracranial pathologies. Delta-24-RGD, a tumor-selective oncolytic adenovirus designed to target malignant glioma cells, has been shown to be effective in animal models and in a recent clinical trial. However, the most efficient strategy for delivering oncolytic therapies remains unclear. BM-hMSCs have been shown to home toward glioma xenografts after intracarotid delivery. The feasibility of selective intraarterial infusion of BM-hMSCs loaded with Delta-24-RGD (BM-hMSC-Delta-24) to deliver the virus to the tumor is being investigated. To evaluate the feasibility of endovascular intraarterial delivery, the authors tested in vitro the compatibility of BM-hMSC-Delta-24 with a variety of commercially available, clinically common microcatheters.

METHODS

BM-hMSCs were cultured, transfected with Delta-24-RGD, and resuspended in 1% human serum albumin. The solution was then injected via 4 common neuroendovascular microcatheters of different inner diameters (Marathon, Echelon-14, Marksman, and SL-10). Cell count and viability after injection through the microcatheters were assessed, including tests of injection velocity and catheter configuration. Transwell assays were performed with the injected cells to test the efficacy of BM-hMSC-Delta-24 activity against U87 glioma cells. BM-hMSC-Delta-24 compatibility was also tested with common neuroendovascular medications: Omnipaque, verapamil, and heparin.

RESULTS

The preinfusion BM-hMSC-Delta-24 cell count was 1.2 × 105 cells/ml, with 98.7% viability. There was no significant difference in postinfusion cell count or viability for any of the catheters. Increasing the injection velocity from 1.0 ml/min to 73.2 ml/min, or modifying the catheter shape from straight to tortuous, did not significantly reduce cell count or viability. Cell count and viability remained stable for up to 5 hours when the cell solution was stored on ice. Mixing BM-hMSC-Delta-24 with clinical concentrations of Omnipaque, verapamil, and heparin prior to infusion did not alter cell count or viability. Transwell experiments demonstrated that the antiglioma activity of BM-hMSC-Delta-24 was maintained after infusion.

CONCLUSIONS

BM-hMSC-Delta-24 is compatible with a wide variety of microcatheters and medications commonly used in neuroendovascular therapy. Stem cell viability and viral agent activity do not appear to be affected by catheter configuration or injection velocity. Commercially available microcatheters can be used to deliver stem cell neurotherapeutics via intraarterial routes.

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Marcos V. C. Maldaun, Shumaila N. Khawja, Nicholas B. Levine, Ganesh Rao, Frederick F. Lang, Jeffrey S. Weinberg, Sudhakar Tummala, Charles E. Cowles, David Ferson, Anh-Thuy Nguyen, Raymond Sawaya, Dima Suki and Sujit S. Prabhu

Object

The object of this study was to describe the experience of combining awake craniotomy techniques with high-field (1.5 T) intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for tumors adjacent to eloquent cortex.

Methods

From a prospective database the authors obtained and evaluated the records of all patients who had undergone awake craniotomy procedures with cortical and subcortical mapping in the iMRI suite. The integration of these two modalities was assessed with respect to safety, operative times, workflow, extent of resection (EOR), and neurological outcome.

Results

Between February 2010 and December 2011, 42 awake craniotomy procedures using iMRI were performed in 41 patients for the removal of intraaxial tumors. There were 31 left-sided and 11 right-sided tumors. In half of the cases (21 [50%] of 42), the patient was kept awake for both motor and speech mapping. The mean duration of surgery overall was 7.3 hours (range 4.0–13.9 hours). The median EOR overall was 90%, and gross-total resection (EOR ≥ 95%) was achieved in 17 cases (40.5%). After viewing the first MR images after initial resection, further resection was performed in 17 cases (40.5%); the mean EOR in these cases increased from 56% to 67% after further resection. No deficits were observed preoperatively in 33 cases (78.5%), and worsening neurological deficits were noted immediately after surgery in 11 cases (26.2%). At 1 month after surgery, however, worsened neurological function was observed in only 1 case (2.3%).

Conclusions

There was a learning curve with regard to patient positioning and setup times, although it did not adversely affect patient outcomes. Awake craniotomy can be safely performed in a high-field (1.5 T) iMRI suite to maximize tumor resection in eloquent brain areas with an acceptable morbidity profile at 1 month.

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Michel Lacroix, Dima Abi-Said, Daryl R. Fourney, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Weiming Shi, Franco DeMonte, Frederick F. Lang, Ian E. McCutcheon, Samuel J. Hassenbusch, Eric Holland, Kenneth Hess, Christopher Michael, Daniel Miller and Raymond Sawaya

Object. The extent of tumor resection that should be undertaken in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to identify significant independent predictors of survival in these patients and to determine whether the extent of resection was associated with increased survival time.

Methods. The authors retrospectively analyzed 416 consecutive patients with histologically proven GBM who underwent tumor resection at the authors' institution between June 1993 and June 1999. Volumetric data and other tumor characteristics identified on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were collected prospectively.

Conclusions. Five independent predictors of survival were identified: age, Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, extent of resection, and the degree of necrosis and enhancement on preoperative MR imaging studies. A significant survival advantage was associated with resection of 98% or more of the tumor volume (median survival 13 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] 11.4–14.6 months), compared with 8.8 months (95% CI 7.4–10.2 months; p < 0.0001) for resections of less than 98%. Using an outcome scale ranging from 0 to 5 based on age, KPS score, and tumor necrosis on MR imaging, we observed significantly longer survival in patients with lower scores (1–3) who underwent aggressive resections, and a trend toward slightly longer survival was found in patients with higher scores (4–5). Gross-total tumor resection is associated with longer survival in patients with GBM, especially when other predictive variables are favorable.

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Markus M. Luedi, Sanjay K. Singh, Jennifer C. Mosley, Islam S. A. Hassan, Masumeh Hatami, Joy Gumin, Lukas Andereggen, Erik P. Sulman, Frederick F. Lang, Frank Stueber, Gregory N. Fuller, Rivka R. Colen and Pascal O. Zinn

OBJECTIVE

Dexamethasone, a known regulator of mesenchymal programming in glioblastoma (GBM), is routinely used to manage edema in GBM patients. Dexamethasone also activates the expression of genes, such as CEBPB, in GBM stem cells (GSCs). However, the drug’s impact on invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis in GBM remains unclear. To determine whether dexamethasone induces invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis in GBM, the authors investigated the drug’s impact in vitro, in vivo, and in clinical information derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort.

METHODS

Expression profiles of patients from the TCGA cohort with mesenchymal GBM (n = 155) were compared with patients with proneural GBM by comparative marker selection. To obtain robust data, GSCs with IDH1 wild-type (GSC3) and with IDH1 mutant (GSC6) status were exposed to dexamethasone in vitro and in vivo and analyzed for invasion (Boyden chamber, human-specific nucleolin), proliferation (Ki-67), and angiogenesis (CD31). Ex vivo tumor cells from dexamethasone-treated and control mice were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting and profiled using Affymetrix chips for mRNA (HTA 2.0) and microRNAs (miRNA 4.0). A pathway analysis was performed to identify a dexamethasone-regulated gene signature, and its relationship with overall survival (OS) was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis in the entire GBM TCGA cohort (n = 520).

RESULTS

The mesenchymal subgroup, when compared with the proneural subgroup, had significant upregulation of a dexamethasone-regulated gene network, as well as canonical pathways of proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Dexamethasone-treated GSC3 demonstrated a significant increase in invasion, both in vitro and in vivo, whereas GSC6 demonstrated a modest increase. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment of both GSC3 and GSC6 lines resulted in significantly elevated cell proliferation and angiogenesis in vivo. Patients with mesenchymal GBM had significant upregulation of dexamethasone-regulated pathways when compared with patients with proneural GBM. A prognostic (p = 0.0007) 33-gene signature was derived from the ex vivo expression profile analyses and used to dichotomize the entire TCGA cohort by high (median OS 12.65 months) or low (median OS 14.91 months) dexamethasone signature.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors present evidence that furthers the understanding of the complex effects of dexamethasone on biological characteristics of GBM. The results suggest that the drug increases invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis in human GSC-derived orthotopic tumors, potentially worsening GBM patients’ prognoses. The authors believe that careful investigation is needed to determine how to minimize these deleterious dexamethasone-associated side effects in GBM.

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Wael Hassaneen, Nicholas B. Levine, Dima Suki, Abhijit L. Salaskar, Alessandra de Moura Lima, Ian E. McCutcheon, Sujit S. Prabhu, Frederick F. Lang, Franco DeMonte, Ganesh Rao, Jeffrey S. Weinberg, David M. Wildrick, Kenneth D. Aldape and Raymond Sawaya

Object

Multiple craniotomies have been performed for resection of multiple brain metastases in the same surgical session with satisfactory outcomes, but the role of this procedure in the management of multifocal and multicentric glioblastomas is undetermined, although it is not the standard approach at most centers.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of data prospectively collected between 1993 and 2008 in 20 patients with multifocal or multicentric glioblastomas (Group A) who underwent resection of all lesions via multiple craniotomies during a single surgical session. Twenty patients who underwent resection of solitary glioblastoma (Group B) were selected to match Group A with respect to the preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, tumor functional grade, extent of resection, age at time of surgery, and year of surgery. Clinical and neurosurgical outcomes were evaluated.

Results

In Group A, the median age was 52 years (range 32–78 years); 70% of patients were male; the median preoperative KPS score was 80 (range 50–100); and 9 patients had multicentric glioblastomas and 11 had multifocal glioblastomas. Aggressive resection of all lesions in Group A was achieved via multiple craniotomies in the same session, with a median extent of resection of 100%. Groups A and B were comparable with respect to all the matching variables as well as the amount of tumor necrosis, number of cysts, and the use of intraoperative navigation. The overall median survival duration was 9.7 months in Group A and 10.5 months in Group B (p = 0.34). Group A and Group B (single craniotomy) had complication rates of 30% and 35% and 30-day mortality rates of 5% (1 patient) and 0%, respectively.

Conclusions

Aggressive resection of all lesions in selected patients with multifocal or multicentric glioblastomas resulted in a survival duration comparable with that of patients undergoing surgery for a single lesion, without an associated increase in postoperative morbidity. This finding may indicate that conventional wisdom of a minimal role for surgical treatment in glioblastoma should at least be questioned.