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Adam S. Arthur, Philipp Taussky, Min S. Park, Michael F. Stiefel and Robert H. Rosenwasser

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L. Fernando Gonzalez, Nohra Chalouhi, Stavropoula Tjoumakaris, Pascal Jabbour, Aaron S. Dumont and Robert H. Rosenwasser

Object

Multiple approaches have been used to treat carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs). The transvenous approach has become a popular and effective route. Onyx is a valuable tool in today's endovascular armamentarium. The authors describe the use of a balloon-assisted technique in the treatment of CCFs with Onyx and assess its feasibility, utility, and safety.

Methods

The authors searched their prospectively maintained database for CCFs embolized using Onyx with the assistance of a compliant balloon placed in the internal carotid artery (ICA).

Results

Five patients were treated between July 2009 and July 2011 at the authors' institution. A balloon helped to identify the fistulous point, served as a buttress for coils, protected from inadvertent arterial embolizations, and prevented Onyx and coils from obscuring the ICA during the course of embolization. No balloon-related complications were noted in any of the 5 cases. All 5 fistulas were completely obliterated at the end of the procedure. Four patients had available clinical follow-ups, and all 4 showed reversal of nerve palsies.

Conclusions

Balloon-assisted Onyx embolization of CCFs offers a powerful combination that prevents inadvertent migration of the embolic material into the arterial system, facilitates visualization of the ICA, and serves as a buttress for coils deployed in the cavernous sinus through the fistulous point. Despite adding another layer of technical complexity, an intraarterial balloon can provide valuable assistance in the treatment of CCFs.

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Rafael Ortiz, Michael Stefanski, Robert Rosenwasser and Erol Veznedaroglu

Object

Aneurysms treated by endovascular coil embolization have been associated with coil compaction, and the rate of recanalization has been reported to be as high as 40%. The authors report the first published evidence of a correlation between aneurysm recanalization correlated with a history of cigarette smoking.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of all cases involving patients admitted to their institution from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2003, for treatment of a cerebral aneurysm. Cases in which patients were treated with coil embolization were reviewed for inclusion. Coil compaction was defined as change in the shape of the coil mass. Aneurysm recanalization was defined as an increase in inflow to the aneurysm in comparison with baseline. The incidence of coil compaction and the relationship with cigarette smoking history were compared in patients with and without recurrence.

Results

A total of 110 patients qualified for inclusion. The odds ratio (OR) for aneurysm recanalization after endosaccular occlusion with respect to history of cigarette smoking was significant for the entire cohort (OR 4.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95–10.52) and especially for the female cohort (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.45–9.54). The male cohort demonstrated a trend toward a direct correlation, but the sample size was not large enough for statistical significance (OR 7.50, 95% CI 1.02–55.00).

Conclusions

There was an increased risk of recanalization especially in patients with low-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage who had a history of cigarette smoking. These data suggest a correlation between cigarette smoking and aneurysm recurrence.

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Robert H. Rosenwasser

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Phillip E. Vinall, Michael S. Kramer, Lynn A. Heinel and Robert H. Rosenwasser

Object. Experimental rat models are often used to study cerebral ischemia, yet rats are nocturnal animals that have activity cycles that are the opposite of those of humans. In the following study the authors examined the circadian rhythm of sensitivity to an ischemic insult in rats by using an intraluminal thread technique to produce reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion.

Methods. Ischemia (2 hours of blockage followed by 22 hours of reperfusion) was induced in rats according to the 24-hour clock at either 100, 400, 700, 1000, 1300, 1600, 1900, or 2200 hours (11–14 rats per time period). The rat brains were removed, coronally sectioned, stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride and analyzed using commercially available software. Analysis of variance and cosinor-rhythmometry statistical tests were used for analysis of data. The time of day when the ischemic infarct was induced had a significant (p = 0.011) influence on the volume of the lesion. The volume of total brain infarct produced at 400 hours (7.65 ± 1.31%) was more than three times greater than the volume produced at 1600 hours (2.1 ± 0.34%). Cosinor-rhythm analysis indicated a peak occurrence of infarct volume at 6:02 (95% confidence interval 5:49–6:16). The size of the infarct correlated with core body temperature rhythms, which varied by 1.3 ± 0.62°C (mean ± standard deviation).

Conclusions. Circadian rhythms, as well as the reversed natural body rhythms of the rat compared with humans, should be considered when extrapolating data to human or other animal studies. Temporal rhythms may also provide information concerning the cascading disease processes associated with cerebral ischemia.

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Pascal Jabbour, Christopher Koebbe, Erol Veznedaroglu, Ronald P. Benitez and Robert Rosenwasser

Object

The treatment of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms represents a challenging problem for neurosurgeons. The recent development of stents has provided clinicians with the ability to treat these aneurysms while keeping the parent vessel patent. The long-term occlusion rate of aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coil placement has yet to be investigated. The authors report the use of a new intracranial stent—the Neuroform microstent—in the treatment of unruptured wide-necked cerebral aneurysms.

Methods

Thirty-two patients harboring unruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms underwent a stent-assisted coil placement procedure. Patients were pretreated with antiplatelet agents, and a stent was positioned across the neck of the aneurysm. The next step was the insertion of coils into the aneurysm cavity. Patients received anticoagulation therapy for 24 hours after the procedure.

All 32 patients with unruptured wide-necked cerebral aneurysms were suitable candidates for this procedure. Occlusion of at least 90% of the aneurysm was achieved in 24 patients (75%) and 0% occlusion was observed in five patients (15%). Two patients experienced thromboembolic events, one of which was directly related to the stent. The overall complication rate was 6.3%.

Conclusions

Intracranial stents will be used more frequently in the new era of endovascular management of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms. With some technical improvements and more data on long-term occlusion rates, this new modality should improve the occlusion of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms while protecting the parent vessel.

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Badih Daou, Nohra Chalouhi, Robert M. Starke, Guilherme Barros, Lina Ya'qoub, John Do, Stavropoula Tjoumakaris, Robert H. Rosenwasser and Pascal Jabbour

OBJECTIVE

With the increasing number of aneurysms treated with endovascular coiling, more recurrences are being encountered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of microsurgical clipping in the treatment of recurrent, previously coiled cerebral aneurysms and to identify risk factors that can affect the outcomes of this procedure.

METHODS

One hundred eleven patients with recurrent aneurysms whose lesions were managed by surgical clipping between January 2002 and October 2014 were identified. The rates of aneurysm occlusion, retreatment, complications, and good clinical outcome were retrospectively determined. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to identify factors associated with these outcomes.

RESULTS

The mean patient age was 50.5 years, the mean aneurysm size was 7 mm, and 97.3% of aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation. The mean follow-up was 22 months. Complete aneurysm occlusion, as assessed by intraoperative angiography, was achieved in 97.3% of aneurysms (108 of 111 patients). Among patients, 1.8% (2 of 111 patients) had a recurrence after clipping. Retreatment was required in 4.5% of patients (5 of 111) after clipping. Major complications were observed in 8% of patients and mortality in 2.7%. Ninety percent of patients had a good clinical outcome. Aneurysm size (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.08–1.7; p = 0.009) and location in the posterior circulation were significantly associated with higher complications. All 3 patients who had coil extraction experienced a postoperative stroke. Aneurysm size (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.02–1.45; p = 0.025) and higher number of interventions prior to clipping (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.3–21.4; p = 0.019) were significant predictors of poor outcome. An aneurysm size > 7 mm was a significant predictor of incomplete obliteration and retreatment (p = 0.018).

CONCLUSIONS

Surgical clipping is safe and effective in treating recurrent, previously coiled cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysm size, location, and number of previous coiling procedures are important factors to consider in the management of these aneurysms.

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Badih Daou, Elias Atallah, Nohra Chalouhi, Robert M. Starke, Jeffrey Oliver, Maria Montano, Pascal Jabbour, Robert H. Rosenwasser and Stavropoula I. Tjoumakaris

OBJECTIVE

The Pipeline embolization device (PED) has become a valuable tool in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Although failures with PED treatment have been reported, the characteristics and course of these aneurysms remain a topic of uncertainty.

METHODS

Electronic medical records and imaging studies were reviewed for all patients treated with the PED between July 2010 and March 2015 to identify characteristics of patients and aneurysms with residual filling after PED treatment.

RESULTS

Of 316 cases treated at a single institution, 281 patients had a long-term follow-up. A total of 52 (16.4%) aneurysms with residual filling were identified and constituted the study population. The mean patient age in this population was 58.8 years. The mean aneurysm size was 10.1 mm ± 7.15 mm. Twelve aneurysms were fusiform (23%). Of the aneurysms with residual filling, there were 20 carotid ophthalmic (CO) aneurysms (20% of all CO aneurysms treated), 10 other paraclinoid aneurysms (16.4% of all paraclinoid aneurysms), 7 posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms (21.9% of all PCoA aneurysms), 7 cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms (14.9% of all cavernous ICA aneurysms), 4 vertebrobasilar (VB) junction aneurysms (14.8% of all VB junction aneurysms), and 3 middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms (25% of all MCA aneurysms). Eleven patients underwent placement of more than one PED (21.2%), with a mean number of devices of 1.28 per case. Eight of 12 aneurysms were previously treated with a stent (15.4%). Nineteen patients underwent re-treatment (36.5%); the 33 patients who did not undergo re-treatment (63.5%) were monitored by angiography or noninvasive imaging. In multivariate analysis, age older than 65 years (OR 2.65, 95% CI 1.33–5.28; p = 0.05), prior stent placement across the target aneurysm (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.15–7.51; p = 0.02), aneurysm location in the distal anterior circulation (MCA, PCoA, and anterior choroidal artery: OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.19–6.18; p = 0.017), and longer follow-up duration (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03–1.09; p < 0.001) were associated with incomplete aneurysm occlusion.

CONCLUSIONS

While the PED can allow for treatment of large, broad-necked aneurysms with high efficacy, treatment failures do occur (16.4%). Aneurysm size, shape, and previous treatment may influence treatment outcome.

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Kate A. Hentschel, Badih Daou, Nohra Chalouhi, Robert M. Starke, Shannon Clark, Ashish Gandhe, Pascal Jabbour, Robert Rosenwasser and Stavropoula Tjoumakaris

OBJECTIVE

Mechanical thrombectomy is standard of care for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. However, limited data are available from assessment of outcomes of FDA-approved devices. The objective of this study is to compare clinical outcomes, efficacy, and safety of non–stent retriever and stent retriever thrombectomy devices.

METHODS

Between January 2008 and June 2014, 166 patients treated at Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience for acute ischemic stroke with mechanical thrombectomy using Merci, Penumbra, Solitaire, or Trevo devices were retrospectively reviewed. Primary outcomes included 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score, recanalization rate (thrombolysis in cerebral infarction [TICI score]), and incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhages (ICHs). Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression determined predictors of mRS Score 3–6, mortality, and TICI Score 3.

RESULTS

A total of 99 patients were treated with non–stent retriever devices (Merci and Penumbra) and 67 with stent retrievers (Solitaire and Trevo). Stent retrievers yielded lower 90-day NIH Stroke Scale scores and higher rates of 90-day mRS scores ≤ 2 (22.54% [non–stent retriever] vs 61.67% [stent retriever]; p < 0.001), TICI Score 2b–3 recanalization rates (79.80% [non–stent retriever] vs 97.01% [stent retriever]; p < 0.001), percentage of parenchyma salvaged, and discharge rates to home/rehabilitation. The overall incidence of ICH was also significantly lower (40.40% [non–stent retriever] vs 13.43% [stent retriever]; p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower 90-day mortality. Use of non–stent retriever devices was an independent predictor of mRS Scores 3–6 (p = 0.002), while use of stent retrievers was an independent predictor of TICI Score 3 (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Stent retriever mechanical thrombectomy devices achieve higher recanalization rates than non–stent retriever devices in acute ischemic stroke with improved clinical and radiographic outcomes and safety.

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Thana Theofanis, Nohra Chalouhi, Richard Dalyai, Robert M. Starke, Pascal Jabbour, Robert H. Rosenwasser and Stavropoula Tjoumakaris

Object

The authors conducted a study to assess the safety and efficacy of microsurgical resection of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and determine predictors of complications.

Methods

A total of 264 patients with cerebral AVMs were treated with microsurgical resection between 1994 and 2010 at the Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience. A review of patient data was performed, including initial hemorrhage, clinical presentation, Spetzler-Martin (SM) grade, treatment modalities, clinical outcomes, and obliteration rates. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine predictors of operative complications.

Results

Of the 264 patients treated with microsurgery, 120 (45%) patients initially presented with hemorrhage. There were 27 SM Grade I lesions (10.2%), 101 Grade II lesions (38.3%), 96 Grade III lesions (36.4%), 31 Grade IV lesions (11.7%), and 9 Grade V lesions (3.4%). Among these patients, 102 (38.6%) had undergone prior endovascular embolization. In all patients, resection resulted in complete obliteration of the AVM. Complications occurred in 19 (7.2%) patients and resulted in permanent neurological deficits in 5 (1.9%). In multivariate analysis, predictors of complications were increasing AVM size (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.5–6.6; p = 0.001), increasing number of embolizations (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.2; p = 0.01), and unruptured AVMs (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1–7.2; p = 0.05).

Conclusions

Microsurgical resection of AVMs is highly efficient and can be undertaken with low rates of morbidity at high-volume neurovascular centers. Unruptured and larger AVMs were associated with higher complication rates.